Nature, Culture and Literature

Articles

No. 9, 2013

Acknowledgements
The book before you had its origins in a doctoral thesis submitted to the Department of Anglophone Studies (Faculty of Humanities, University of Duisburg-Essen) in 2011. Parts of the thesis have been abridged and others rewritten, reducing the introductory...
Read preview Overview
1. Introduction
It is a truth almost universally acknowledged that the physical world is in crisis. Discussions of environmental degradation, the "sixth mass extinction" of animals (see Leakey & Lewin 1995, Heise 2010a) and anthropogenic climate change express an...
Read preview Overview
2. the State of Environmental Literary Criticism
In recent years, the field of ecocriticism has burgeoned and gone through various stages of theoretical refinement and institutional recognition. Although it is still most dominant in the English and other language departments, its development is multiform,...
Read preview Overview
3. Postcolonial Texts and the 'Event of Fiction'
That aesthetics is closely linked to ethics is not a new insight (for a recent discussion, see Middeke 2011; Harpham 2010). In the context of the crisis of the imagination and environmental crisis, one may focus, for instance, on what Terry Eagleton...
Read preview Overview
4. A Good Dose of Formalism? Reading the Hungry Tide
In the following chapters, I want to discuss the heuristic value of a focus on narrative strategies and the concept of a ?deep structure' of texts in the context of hermeneutic interpretation and (postcolonial) ecocriticism. The event of EnvironMentality,...
Read preview Overview
5. Facets of EnvironMentality
As Wolfgang Iser maintains, with literary theory, readers can discern literary meaning by virtue of "mapping" (see Iser 2006: 5). The preceding chapter has indeed sought to map sources of what Buell describes as textual "environmentality" (Buell 2008:...
Read preview Overview
6. the Uses of F(r)iction: The Heart of Redness, the Whale Caller and Their Critique of Sustainable Development and Becoming-Animal
The relation between time and narrative has been studied more thoroughly than any narrative engagement with place, not least of all by Paul Ricceur, who describes the narration of time via fiction as a "transcultural form of necessity" (1983: 52). The...
Read preview Overview
7. Negotiating the Human-Animal Boundary: Intertextuality and Metafiction in Life of Pi and Beatrice and Virgil
Reviewing and discussing twentieth-century animal narratives and how they are discussed in ecocriticism and animal studies, Rebecca Raglon and Marian Scholtmeijer describe how animal advocacy and environmentalism have developed along separate lines....
Read preview Overview
8. "Zero Time" and the Apocalypse: Postnatural Survival in Oryx and Crake and the Year of the Flood
Staging the environment and emplotting human, animal or ?humanimal' identities in fiction rely heavily on gaps and tensions that foster readerly negotiations of meaning. The result of these negotiations, the literary experience of alterity, constitutes...
Read preview Overview
9. Posthumanism and the Wounded Being: 'Transformative Mimesis' in the Lives of Animals and Elizabeth Costello
Admittedly, I have shunned so far a discussion of the two slogans I mentioned at the beginning of this book, namely the challenge of "thinking like a mountain" and knowing what it is like "to be a bat". They will now return to the fore. My readings so...
Read preview Overview
10. towards and beyond a Conclusion
There is one passage in The Lives of Animals that epitomises the problem of ecocriticism understood as an ?environmentalist practice'. It is a conversation between Costello's son, John, and his mother:?Do you really believe, Mother, that poetry classes...
Read preview Overview

No. 8, 2012

Acknowledgements
My gratitude goes to scholars who were instrumental in the shaping and completion of this book in ways that were as concrete as they were also elusive and emotive: Attie De Lange, Michael Webster, Norman Friedman, Jewel Spears Brooker, and Nicholas Meihuizen.I...
Read preview Overview
Preface
Nature is vital to the project of the American modernist poet E. E. Cummings (1894-1962): an analogy from the world of natural history helps illuminate an approach which may be taken in coming to grips with this key aspect of his oeuvre. The study of...
Read preview Overview
Chapter 1: Cummings's Poetic Status and His Cco-Logos
(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)l(aleaffa11s)one1iness (CP 673)Significant elements of Cummings's poetry are found in this muchdiscussed leaf poem. The lack of a title, accentuated blank space, the prominence of its visual aspect, its economy...
Read preview Overview
Chapter 2: The Rise of Cummings's Ecological Status
Students of Cummings's work need little convincing that his poetry is nature-centered.Michael Dylan Welch (1995)The world of nature in all its vibrancy and dynamism resists any final definition, as does the man who has discovered his place in the rhythmic...
Read preview Overview
Chapter 3: The Scope of Cummings's Poetic Ecology
The poet is not merely an observer of Nature, but is immersed in her, and from thence turns his gaze upon people, upon the age, and upon America. Heretofore, we have had Nature talked of and discussed; these poems approximate to a direct utterance of...
Read preview Overview
Chapter 4: The Manner and Achievement of Cummings's Poetic Ecology
We have come to realize that there are no static structures in nature. There is stability, but this stability is one of dynamic balance, and the further we penetrate into matter the more we need to understand its dynamic nature to understand its patterns.Fritjof...
Read preview Overview
Chapter 5: A Modernist Reconfiguration? Cummings, Eliot, Pound, and the Modernist Poetic Eco-Logos
G? the room the women come and goTalking of Michelangelo. (Eliot 1991:3,4)This is the much-discussed refrain of Eliot's 1917 poem 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock', and how different it is in every respect from Cummings' s manner of ecological affirmation...
Read preview Overview
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.