Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

Articles from No. 23, 2011

A DEMENTED FORM OF THE PARTICULAR: Surrealism, Suite and Eleutheria
It has become a commonplace to note that Beckett's use of a disoriented and derelict first-person speaker in the Novellas presents a break with his technique in earlier fictional efforts. Yet there is good reason to believe that Beckett's narrators in...
AUTONOMY AND THE EVERYDAY: Beckett, Late Modernism and Post-War Visual Art
Beckett's work has been important to several generations of post-war visual artists, and continues to figure strongly in the contemporary art-world. Although this relationship has often been seen in terms of a shared minimalist aesthetic, the present...
BECKETT'S DRAMA: Platonic 'Ideas' versus Aristotelian 'Shapes'
In questioning representation, (post)modern literature and art emphasized meta-representation and the philosophy and critique of art. In the same vein, Samuel Beckett was concerned with the nature of art and the shape(s) to accommodate his message(s)....
BECKETT'S POSTHUMAN: The Ontopology of the Unnamable
Identifying the posthuman as that which is locatable within a halfposthumous space and which both has a subjectivity that is always divided and distanced from itself, and a corporeality of the same quality, this paper considers the mutually reflective...
BLACK HOLES: A Philosophical View on Endgame's and Bartleby's Stalemates
This article focuses on two significant texts revealing the crisis and stalemate of narrative during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: Herman Melville's short tale Bartleby, The Scrivener and Samuel Beckett's Endgame. Particular attention is paid...
Endgame: Beckett's "Ecological Thought"
Ecocriticism has tended to avoid modernist texts in favour of ones that make vivid, epiphanic reference to nature. Beckett's Endgame states, in common with some environmentalists, that "there's no more nature" - but refuses to reveal the dimensions of...
MURPHY'S BECKETT: Legacy and Agon
Through consideration of a single play, this study examines how an Irish playwright of a later generation engages with the legacy of Beckett. Tom Murphy's 1985 play Bailegangaire is shown to adopt certain characteristically Beckettian images and structures...
"OOFTTSH": Writing, Orality, and the Specter of Yiddish in an Early Poem by Samuel Beckett
This article discusses the 1938 poem "Ooftish," Beckett's only work to use a Yiddish term. Its title derives from the expressions tokhes afii tish or takhles afn tish. The significance of these expressions, and the fact that Beckett only approximates...
"TOO RED A HERRING": The Unattainable Self in the Unnamable
Brian McHale posits that the distinction between the modem and the post-modern lies in their respective emphases upon epistemological and ontological considerations. Samuel Beckett, long considered a liminal author, provides a bridge between the modern...
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