The Sculpture Journal

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 1, 2013

A House Divided: American Art since 1955
Anne Middleton Wagner, A House Divided: American Art Since 1955 University of California Press, Berkeley, 2012, hardback, £48.95, ISBN: 9780520268470, paperback, £24.95, ISBN: 9780520270978, pp. 304, 85 colour and b/w illustrationsIt is not always easy...
A Material Distinction: Fifteenth-Century Tin-Glazed Terracotta Portraits in Italy
In the 1430s and 1440s Luca della Robbia developed a permanent and lustrous method to colourfully accent terracotta sculpture. The reasons why he developed the tin-glazing technique have been debated through the centuries, and typically range from the...
'An Eye for an Eye': Examining a Cuneiform Inscription on the Nebraska State Capitol
There is little doubt that the Nebraska State Capitol building is a masterwork of art, architecture, history and mythology (fig. 1). Its skin of Indiana limestone records the political and legal growth of human civilization with quotations from Plato,...
Antico: The Golden Age of Renaissance Bronzes
Antico: The Golden Age of Renaissance Bronzes The National Gallery of Art, Washington, 6 November 2011-8 April, 2012 and the Frick Collection, New York, 1 May 2012-29 July, 2012 Eleonora Luciano (ed.), Antico: The Golden Age of Renaissance Bronzes, exh....
Editorial
This issue of the Journal carries two tributes, one to Jonathan Scott, the other to Terry Friedman. Both were eclectic and catholic in their tastes, both leaned towards sculpture in their interests and enthusiasms, and both were men of the utmost integrity....
Ends of the Earth: Land Art to 1974
Philipp Kaiser and Miwon Kwon, Ends of the Earth: Land Art to 1974 Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and Prestel, Munich, 2012. Publication to accompany the exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Geffen Contemporary at...
From Pitch to Plinth: Documenting the United Kingdom's Football Statuary
Public figurative sculpture in Britain dates largely from the Victorian period,1 when public art was considered to be ennobling.2 By the early twentieth century this perspective had changed, with Melville arguing that 'the provision of statues serves...
G. F. Watts's Della Robbia Tondo
In the 1890s the Victorian artist and sculptor George Frederic Watts (1817-1904) was given a magnificent polychromatic glazed terracotta tondo, in the manner of Luca della Robbia (c.1400-82), depicting the Madonna and the Christ-child supported by an...
Herminio: Sculpture, Physics and Motion
This article sets out to demonstrate that the sculpture of Herminio Álvarez (b. 1945) presents in an immediate way major philosophical problems.1 In the first place, it takes on the discussion regarding the minimal, essential components in sculpture,...
James Watt and the Reproduction of Sculpture
The eighteenth-century engineers James Watt (1736-1819) and Matthew Boulton (1728-1809) are best known for their work in introducing reliable and affordable steam power to the workshops of Britain. It is less well known that in the garret workshop at...
Jonathan Scott (1940-2012): CBE, FSA
In his role as chairman of both the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art and Objects of Cultural Interest (1985-95) and the Acceptance-in-Lieu Panel (2000-10), Jonathan Scott oversaw the mechanisms by which the nation acquires material evidence...
Lebon, Fonte Au Sable - Fonte À Cire Perdue. Histoire D'une Rivalité
Elisabeth Lebon, Fonte au sable - Fonte à cire perdue. Histoire d'une rivalité Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, Éditions Ophrys, Paris, 2012, 213 pp., 13 b/w illustrations. 20 Euros. ISBN 978-2-7080-1338-4One seeming contradiction in twentiethcentury...
Momentary vs. Monumentary: Medardo Rosso and Public Sculpture
When Medardo Rosso (1858-1928) moved to Paris in 1889, the city was in the midst of an 'epidemic of statuary',1 which reached its peak between 1900 and 1910. Receiving a commission for a monument marked the public consecration of sculptors and the successful...
Neo-Neoclassicism: How Wilton's Bust of Hollis Launched David Hicks
It is a curiously stimulating paradox that a work from a deeply unfashionable artistic genre can, at the same time, be an essential component in the creation of something regarded as the epitome of fashion. A fascinating and recently discovered example...
Public Sculpture of Historic Westminster
Philip Ward-Jackson, Public Sculpture of Historic Westminster Vol. I, Public Sculpture of Britain, 14, Liverpool University Press, Liverpool, 2012, hardback, £70.00. ISBN 9781846316623, paperback, £30.00, ISBN: 9781846316913, pp. 500, 320 b/w illustrationsFran...
Shaping the Master: The Emergence of Donatello in Nineteenth-Century Britain
'Either the spirit of Donato worked in Buonarroti, or that of Buonarroti first acted in Donato.'1 As a result of Vasari's praise linking him with Michelangelo, Donatello was at all times esteemed, acknowledged as the greatest sculptor of the early Renaissance....
Terry Friedman, 1940-2013
Terry Friedman, who has died suddenly aged 72, was a rare being - a scholar curator working in a regional museum, and an outstanding art historian, educator and collector. Between 1969 and 1993, as Keeper of Decorative Art Studies at Temple Newsam, Leeds,...
The Space of Narrative in Caro's Trojan War
Among Anthony Caro's work of the 1990s were two major sculpture series - The Trojan War (1993/4) and The Last Judgement (1999). In terms of their scope and size, they are almost unprecedented in the history of modern and contemporary art.1 The subject...
Visions of Power: Andreas Schlüter's Monuments to the Great Elector and Friedrich III and I
When Friedrich Wilhelm the Great Elector (the Große Kurfürst, reigned 1640-88) died in 1688, Berlin was under the cultural domination of the Netherlands.1 Friedrich Wilhelm had studied in the Netherlands in his youth, and in 1646 married Louise Henriette,...
Working with Limestone: The Science, Technology and Art of Medieval Limestone Monuments
Vibeke Olson (ed.), Working with Limestone: The Science, Technology and Art of Medieval Limestone Monuments (AVISTA Studies in the History of Medieval Technology, Science and Art, vol. 7), Ashgate, Farnham and Burlington, 2011, 288 pp., 1 colour 115...
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