Times Higher Education

Articles from No. 2145, March 27

£133,000 Paid to V-C on Abrupt Exit
Canterbury Christ Church University declines to disclose reasons for departure. Jack Grove reports Canterbury Christ Church University has refused to give detailed reasons why it paid its former vice-chancellor £133,000 for "loss of office"...
Advice Squad
PhD supervisors range from excellent to abysmal. Five academics talk about the advisers they had as postgraduates and how their experience affects the way they mentor now When a PhD supervision session constitutes just another blocked-out...
Blogger Set on Smoothing Road to Open Access
An academic is asking researchers and librarians to send him more examples of cases where open access article fees have been paid to the publisher Elsevier but the article in question remains behind a paywall.The call has been made by Peter Murray-Rust,...
Cash Cows: Focus on Recruiting Foreigners Reveals Mission Drift
Pro v-c attacks profit chasing in sector and calls time on marketing speak. David Matthews writes Universities have been warned that they are not "profit-maximising corporations" and to ditch "marketing speak" when recruiting international...
Cinematic Deconstruction: Derrida Gets a Close-Up
Film draws on 1980 work to bring philosopher's ideas to general audience. Matthew Reisz writes A director based at the University of Sussex has made an Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded feature film inspired by the work of Jacques...
Evaluation System Benefits Easy Riders
Light workloads and good grades for students get lecturers high teaching scores. Jack Grove writes Academics and students are tacitly trading light workloads and lenient marking for higher teaching evaluation scores, a study claims.This unspoken...
For the Greater Good
Government should use the funding system to align the interests of students, universities, employers and wider society, says Johnny Rich What if a simple change to student funding could do away with student debt, give universities secure long-term...
From Where I Sit
Jagged edges slow progressWestern Cape, South Africa. They say that the climate and the terrain is Mediterranean, but to me it is more like a relentlessly sunny California, buffeted by cooling ocean breezes. Stellenbosch, where I am staying, at the heart...
Graduates Postpone Job Hunt as Gap Years Take Off
Poor career prospects fuel rise in US university leavers seeking 'funemployment', says Jon Marcus Cornell University student Michelle Huang is an undergraduate majoring in international labour relations with a minor in law and society. She...
Grant Winners
Royal SocietyWolfson Research Merit AwardsAwards are worth £10,000-£30,000 a year, which is a salary enhancementAward winner: Damon TeagleInstitution: University of SouthamptonThe timing and duration of mid-ocean ridge flank hydrothermal chemical exchangeAward...
HE&me
Diane Coyle is vice-chair of the BBC Trust and also sits on the Economic and Social Research Council research committee. She was the economics editor on The Independent for eight years and a member of the 2010 Browne Review of higher education...
Humour Has Left the Building
Robert Eaglestone bridles at provocative, yet tired, quips from the Elvis of philosophers Zizek's Jokes (Did You Hear the One about Hegel and Negation?)By Slavoj ZizekMIT Press, 168pp, £12.95ISBN 9780262026710Published 1 April 2014Having Fun...
Letters
Not all pathways are private onesThe feature "The rise of the route masters" (20 March) gives a partial picture of what it terms the pre-degree pathways "industry" by assuming that private providers have created and now monopolise a wholly new phenomenon...
Lifting the Cap 'Fails to Widen Access' in Australia
Australia's move to a demand-driven higher education system has not increased the proportion of poor students entering the system, a report has concluded.According to The Australian newspaper, the forthcoming report by Australia's National Centre for...
Mike Blandamer, 1934-2014
A leading researcher in thermodynamics has died. Mike Blandamer, the son of a policeman, was born in Dorchester on 19 December 1934 and remained a passionate Dorset man for the rest of his life.He studied for a BSc in chemistry at the University of Southampton...
Minister Belatedly Rolls out the Welcome Mat
The new immigration minister has said that he wants to welcome international students to the UK, in a departure from the threatening rhetoric he used earlier this month towards universities.Speaking at an event at the House of Commons last week, James...
Modern Field Has a Champion with a Rare Crown Privilege
Southampton scholar tells John Elmes about his pride in being appointed the first Regius professor of computer science "I am the first Regius professor for computer science. That's a nice thing to be able to say," said Nick Jennings, who has...
Network to Help End 'Isolation' of Black Postdocs
Two postdoctoral students are setting up a network to help overcome the "isolation" that black and minority ethnic PhD candidates may feel in the academy.One of the students, Monique Charles, from the University of Warwick, said that the network was...
News in Brief
THE AwardsEntries now openEntries are now being welcomed from universities across the UK for the 10th Times Higher Education Awards. Institutions, departments and individuals will compete in 18 categories that aim to highlight the achievements of the...
No Bonanza for Those Who Left Places Unfilled
Big post-92s suffer as Hefce steers allocations towards strongest recruiters. John Morgan writes Universities that proved less popular with undergraduates this year have had their student number allocations for next year cut, despite the government...
NSS Cooperation Withheld over Module Demands
A group of students at the University of Manchester is hoping to force through changes to the institution's economics curriculum by threatening to give it negative feedback on the National Student Survey.The Post-Crash Economics Society has been campaigning...
Olympic Park Still a Field of Gold Dreams
An East London innovation and education quarter is arising with universities' help. Holly Else reports As the UK watched Jessica Ennis, Mo Farah and Greg Rutherford storm to gold on the "Super Saturday" of the 2012 London Olympics few will...
PhD Scholarship Appeal Bid Fails
Leeds postgrad who had award revoked criticises eight-month wait for OIA ruling. Paul Jump writes A former PhD student who says that she has been battling deportation, eviction and poverty while awaiting a decision from the Office of the Independent...
Presence Haunted by Absence
Shahidha Bari finds vivid and lurid representations of the unnerving normality of the everyday in today's Rwanda Rwanda in Photographs: Death Then, Life NowUntil 30 April 2014Inigo Rooms, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus, King's College...
Queen Mary Critic Loses Unfair Dismissal Claim
A lecturer's position was genuinely redundant even though an apparently equivalent position was advertised a short time later, an employment tribunal has ruled.The issue was at the heart of former cell biology lecturer Fanis Missirlis' unfair dismissal...
Reality Has No Manual
Kevin Fong asks himself how to prepare his students for the impossible Every now and again, you wonder what you know for sure about your job. Right now, all I know for sure is that this evening, I must mark the coursework and write this column.I...
Reality Trumps the 'What-Ifs'
Ascertaining the truth behind events is what matters, says Robert Gellately, not hypotheticals Altered Pasts: Counterfactuals in History By Richard J. Evans Little, Brown224pp, £20.00 and £14.99 ISBN 9781408705520, 5537 and 5544 (e-book) Published...
Ripping Yarns
Academic, travel writer and former European surfing champion Sam Bleakley talks to Matthew Reisz about his fondness for riding the waves in destinations often viewed as 'no-go' areas On 26 July 2006, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia - Africa's...
Seeing the Wonder
The intense focus needed for groundbreaking scientific research is blind to prejudice, says Hiranya Peiris Last week, the scientific community held its collective breath when the BICEP2 Collaboration announced the first evidence of events...
Setting Up an Overseas Campus? Why Not Choose a Tropical Paradise
Mauritius wants foreign students; Aberystwyth will help to provide them. David Matthews reports Soon after Aberystwyth University announced it was setting up a campus in Mauritius - the Indian Ocean island known for its pristine beaches and...
Sheer Breadth of Offering Drives Demand for Places
Opportunities for hands-on practice and a funded research base make Central popular, finds Matthew Reisz Whatever challenges the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama faces, trying to fill its places is not one of them."On our acting courses,"...
Study There, Work There, Profit There
Investing in regional universities would rebalance UK economy, study finds. David Matthews writes Last December, Vince Cable, the business secretary, memorably described London as "a kind of giant suction machine, draining the life out of...
Take Cover: Mixing Science and Politics Can Be Explosive
Successful policymaking alliances are achievable if academics and politicians stick to their own strengths, says Keith Humphreys If you were constructing a new house, you would reasonably expect the architect and the engineer to collaborate....
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
An inspirational supervisor can nurture a career, while a poor one slows its growth. Either way, mentors have a lasting impact The cliché has it that research-focused academics can't be bothered with teaching and are more interested in ploughing...
The Heady Cocktail of Life
Weigh all the evidence, says Tristan Bekinschtein, when determining what makes us the way we are We Are Our Brains: From the Womb to Alzheimer'sBy Dick SwaabAllen Lane, 448pp, £20.00 and £11.99ISBN 9780241003725 and 3732 (e-book)Published...
THE Scholarly Web
Weekly transmissions from the blogosphere Negotiating the terms and conditions of a new job is a sensitive process. Ask for too much and you appear greedy; accept the first offer and you might be missing out on a few extra perks.For one US...
The Week in Higher Education
It felt as though this was the week the world of front-line politics finally caught up with the stark warnings that have been detailed in these pages for some time - that the £9,000 fee system is unsustainable. Chuka Umunna, the shadow business secretary,...
Truly, Madly, Deeply
To: All University StaffFrom: The Office of Jamie Targett, Director of Corporate AffairsAt last week's meeting of the University Marketing and Branding Committee, concern was expressed at the overuse of certain positive terms in the university's publicity...
UK/US Institution Alliance Aims for Collaborative Growth
Birmingham and Illinois pledge coordination on research from the bottom up. Paul Jump reports A pioneering formal tie-up between a UK university and a US university promises to be much more than a "mountain that brings forward a mouse", a...
Unwillingly Exiled, a Vice-Chancellor Fights to Get Back to Work
David Matthews speaks to the Dutch head of a Papua New Guinean university deported last year Albert Schram is a university leader in exile. He is the vice-chancellor of Papua New Guinea University of Technology (Unitech), but in February 2013...
What Are You Reading?
A weekly look over the shoulders of our scholar-reviewers Sara Clethero, head of voice, London College of Music, University of West London, is reading Peter T. Harrison's Singing: Personal and Performance Values in Training (Dunedin, 2013)....
World in Brief
Australia'Poor standards' a fictionThere is no evidence that some Australian universities are softer markers or have lower academic standards than others, a study has found. The four-year "Office for Learning and Teaching" project, led by Kerri-Lee Krause,...
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