Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies

Articles from Vol. 3, No. 3, August

(De)stabilizing Self-Identities in Professional Work
IntroductionIt is beyond doubt that we have witnessed an intensive process of professionalization in most Western countries. A growing number of people have undergone higher education, obtained university degrees, and joined the ranks of professionals....
Employees as Individually and Collectively Acting Subjects-Key Contributions from Nordic Working Life Research
IntroductionThe Nordic countries-Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden-are societies that share many features among themselves that also distinguish them from other industrialized countries. Important features are related to the welfare society...
Exploring and Expanding the Category of 'Young Workers' According to Situated Ways of Doing Risk and Safety-A Case Study in the Retail Industry
IntroductionWhy is the safety of young adult workers interesting?Young adult workers aged 18-24 years have the highest risk of accident/injury (Breslin et al. 2007; Rasmussen et al. 2011; Salminen 2004) and account for more than 700,000 serious accidents...
Habituating Pain: Questioning Pain and Physical Strain as Inextricable Conditions in the Construction Industry
IntroductionConstruction work around the world has historically been a field of work characterized by high levels of physical strain (Andrésen 1984; Applebaum 1999; Morton 2002). It is characterized by high work pace (NFA 2012), heavy lifting, dragging,...
Intersectional Directions in Working Life Research-A Proposal
IntroductionThe contribution of gender studies and its impact on the field of working life research in Sweden cannot be stressed enough (Knocke 1981; Gonäs 1989; Baude 1992; Sommestad 1992; Abrahamsson 2000; Christensson 2000). Pioneering work on behalf...
Perspectives on Nordic Working Life Research
Welcome to this Thematic Issue on Perspectives on Nordic Working Life Research! It is perhaps not that surprising that a journal called Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies contains many discussions about "Nordic Models": What is the Nordic Welfare...
Quality in Modern Nordic Working Life-Investigating Three Related Research Perspectives and Their Possible Cross-Fertilization
IntroductionAlarge body of research shows that workers suffer psychologically if they experience a loss of meaning or feel inadequate to the demands of modern working life (e.g., Buch et al. 2009, Lund et al. 2005, 2007, Wainwright & Calnan 2002,...
Social Relations at the Collective Level: The Meaning and Measurement of Collective Control in Research on the Psychosocial Work Environment
IntroductionThe psychological and organizational conditions people experience in the workplace are often referred to as "the psychosocial work environment" (e.g., Hammer et al., 2004; Johnson & Hall, 1994, 1996; Johnson & Johansson, 1991; Kasl,...
The Diffusion of Flexibility: Estimating the Incidence of Low-Regulated Working Conditions
IntroductionDuring the past thirty years, an increasing number of changes have taken place in the labor market in Sweden and in many other Western countries. The service industry has expanded to become by far the largest employer in the OECD area (OECD,...
Trade Union Cooperation in the EU: Views among Swedish Trade Unions and Their Members
The development of the EU brings about many challenges for trade unions, the aim of which is to improve or defend members' employment and working conditions. Besides the task of trying to increase or keep up wages, unions are involved in all kinds of...
Trade Union Responses to Transnational Labour Mobility in the Finnish-Estonian Context
IntroductionTrade unions always operate in a specific institutional context, which is related to the nation state (e.g., Penninx and Roosblad 2000). Consequently, this article on trade union strategies in relation to transnational labor mobility in Finland...
Work, Sickness, Absence, and Identity-Work
IntroductionAccording to the Central Statistics Bureau in Norway (SSB), the level of sick leave in Norway was 7.7% in 2009. Long-term (more than 12 weeks) sick leave is seen as more worrying than short-term absence. Indeed, prolonged leave is associated...
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