Marlowe Studies

Articles

Vol. 5, 2015

Dead Shepherd: Marlowe's Mighty Saw
I feel tempted to speak in English and to derive everything from "may" and "might" . . . (for) we have in the English "might" at once the form might and might as power, the verb and the noun, the optative subjunctive and die magic power to make or let...
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Mariovian Models and Itinerant Identities: Dido, Tamburlaine, and the Discourse of Colonialism
In this essay, I will be discussing a number of texts that share three common characteristics: all are in various ways predicated on and intervene in the expansionist drive to export Englishness to colonies or enclaves overseas; all in one way or another...
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The Legacy of Mephistopheles: Marlowe's Magical Influence on the Late Lancashire Witches
There is a method to the devils magic. The demons that populate the early modern stage take no pains to hide the fact. In act 4 of Doctor Faustus, the scholar-magician promises to bring the pregnant Duchess of Vanholt "a dish of ripe grapes" but despite...
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Zenocrate's Power, the "Remorse of Conscience," and Tamburlaine's Ovidian Impotence in 1 and 2 Tamburlaine
"Kings, but the conscience, all things can defend"1Why is "divine Zenocrate" Tamburlaine's favorite epithet for his beloved?2 Derived from the Ancient Greek words Zeno or Zr]vo-, a combining form of Zeúc;, meaning God, and kratos or kgâioç, meaning power,...
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Dido, Queen of Carthage, Hamlet., and the Transformation of Narcissism
It is fairly frequently observed that Phoebe's couplet in Air You Like It (1599)-"Dead shepherd, now I find your saw of might, / 'Who ever loved that loved not at first sight?"'1-is the only occasion in which William Shakespeare acknowledges and quotes...
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Moving with Marlowe (& Co.): Relocation, Appropriation, and Personation in Thomas Dekker's the Shoemaker's Holiday
Nostalgia advertising, teasing out that "yearning for yesterday," becomes particularly potent and prominent at "transitional times" such as the end of a century: "a time of cultural anxiety" when "there is a perceived discontinuity between the centuries,...
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Working with Marlowe: Shakespeare's Early Engagement with Marlowe's Poetics
Two young men are sitting at a table in candlelit room. Paper, pen, and ink on the table. The slightly better dressed of the two is reading from the sheet in front of him, stops, goes over it once more, before nodding approvingly, "Mmm . . . good, very...
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The Year's Work in Marlowe Studies: 2014
Perhaps unsurprisingly, given that it was the 450th anniversary of Marlowe's birth, 2014 proved an immensely productive year for Marlowe scholars, with Daniel Cadman and Andrew Duxfield's guestedited Early Modern Eiterary Studies special issue, "Christopher...
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Fortune's Breath: Rewriting the Classical Storm in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare
Critics often identify Christopher Marlowe and Thomas Nashe's play Dido, Queene of Carthage as a significant precursor for William Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra (c. 1606-7), as well as his more explicitly Virgilian drama The Teinpest (1611). The...
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Vol. 4, 2014

Fore-Words
We are honored to publish the fourth issue of Marlowe Studies: An Annual in the year that marks the 450th anniversary of the author's birth in Canterbury. As always, we solicit essays on scholarly topics directly related to Marlowe and his role in the...
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Playing Prisoner's Base in Marlowe's Edward II
Act 4, scene 2 of Christopher Marlowe's Edward II opens with Queen Isabella and Prince Edward reacting to the French king's refusal to provide them with assistance. Rejected by her brother, estranged from her husband, and isolated in the country of her...
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Bookish Play: Imitation and Innovation in Dido, Queen of Carthage
Marlowe's generation inherited a mythic tradition of Dido and Aeneas that was contested by various historical, literary, and moral sources. As a work of imitatio, Dido, Queen of Carthage is generally understood to be drawing upon two dominant literary...
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What's Actaeon to Aeneas? Marlowe's Mythological Mischief
In this essay, I examine how Marlowe yokes two ostensibly unconnected figures from classical mythology, Aeneas and Actaeon, in such a way that the one is used critically to examine the other. The first of these, Aeneas, was central to England's image...
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Marlovian Influences in Lust's Dominion; or, the Lascivious Queen
Although Lust's Dominion; Or, The Lascivious Queen (c. 1600) has attracted interest in its authorship, its portrayal of the Moor, and its connection to other Moor plays, the Marlovian influences on the play have received less attention, and the portrayal...
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More Masques, Mummings, and Metadrama: The Duke of Vanholt Scene in Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus (B-Text)
The Marlowe editor and scholar, Roma Gill, repeats the anecdote of a witty undergraduate, who, following Aristotle's famous dictum in the Poetics (c. 330 BCE), described the plot of Doctor Faustus as a "beginning, a muddle, and an end."1 Indeed, that...
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The Bell, the Bodies, and the Bonking: The Massacre at Paris and Its Early Playhouse Audiences
What made Christopher Marlowe's The Massacre at Paris so distinctive, so much so that its influence lasted for at least ten years- despite repertories crowded with plays-and resulted (possibly) in a late 1590s revival, assorted offspring or kin, and...
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The Power to Change a Line: Marlowe's Translation of Ovid's Amores
Christopher Marlowe's translation of Ovid's Amores (c. 19 BCE), first published as Certaine of Ovids Elegies (c. 1590), shows a deep understanding of the technical structures and poetic themes of Ovid's Latin verse.1 He translates with an attention to...
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The Year's Work in Marlowe Studies: 2013
Last year I noted that Marlowe Studies: An Annual was responsible for stimulating and nurturing a significant proportion of the year's Marlovian criticism. That trend continues, and I discuss that journal's contents throughout this article, but whilst...
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No. 3, 2013

THE EDITORS: Fore-Words
We are pleased to publish the third issue of Marlowe Studies: An Annual We solicit contributions on scholarly topics directly related to the author and his role in the literary culture of his time. Especially welcome are studies of the plays and poetry;...
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Leander's Index: Reading Desire in Marlowe's Hero and Leander
As Leander drifts homeward on a cloudy morning after his first night with Hero in Christopher Marlowe's epyllion, he sports, rather showily, many souvenirs of the evening, which are also markers of his new status as victorious lover. A garland of "Cupids...
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Marlowe's Counterfeit Cyrus
A counterfeit profession is better Than unseen hypocrisy.1Patrick Cheney's masterful exposition of Christopher Marlowe's Ovidian contestation of Edmund Spenser's Virgilian career trajectory, Marlowe's Counterfeit Profession: Ovid, Spenser, Counter-Nationhood...
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Marlowe, Hoffman, and the Admiral's Men
It can hardly be wrong to identify Marlowe with the Admiral's long career as much as we do Shakespeare with their opposites.The data suggest that, while the Admiral's Men started out, unsurprisingly, with Marlowe as a strong presence in their repertory,...
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The Uses of Unity: Individual and Multitude in the Jew of Malta
When the governor of Malta, Ferneze, seizes the wealth of the rich Jew, Barabas, and justifies it as an act calculated to "save the ruin of a multitude,"1 he evokes a concept-that of a unified people and a common good-that The Jew of Malta interrogates...
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"And Yet It Might Be Done That Way": The Jew of Malta on Film
Late in 2009, film director Douglas Morse sat in the audience of a Manhattan theater, watching the York Shakespeare Company's production of The Jew of Malta. Mesmerized by the play, which ran in repertory with The Merchant of Venice (1596), he was shocked...
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"I'll Burn My Books": Doctor Faustus as a Renaissance Magus
In 1398, the faculty of the University of Paris issued and approved twenty-eight articles condemning ritual magic as blasphemous, heretical, idolatrous, and superstitious, and emphasized the conjurer's entente with demons as a violation of God's will.1...
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"Truest of the Twain": History and Poetry in Edward II
Christopher Marlowe's Edward II is a play haunted by doubleness. There are two Edwards, Edward II and Edward III, of whom one has a lover, Gaveston, whose role is doubly echoed and riddled, first by Edward's wife Isabella and secondly by his later favorite...
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Perform to Power: Isabella's Performative Self-Creation in Edward II
She-Wolf of France, with unrelenting fangs,That tear'st the bowels of thy mangled Mate1With this voracious image, the poet Thomas Grey cemented the infamy of Edward II's Queen Isabella in the popular imagination. Known to posterity as the vindictive...
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Costumes, Bodies, and Gender in the Queen's Company's 2004 Production of Edward II
From October 9 to October 24, 2004, The Queen's Company staged Christopher Marlowe's Edward II in New York City. This particular production featured only women as actors, which demonstrated how necessary it is to include women in the performance of Marlowe's...
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The Year's Work in Marlowe Studies: 2012
In his excellent annotated bibliography of Christopher Marlowe studies from 2000 to 2009 that appeared in the first issue of this annual, Bruce E. Brandt was able to analyze trends in current Marlowe scholarship not only over the ten-year period that...
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No. 2, 2012

Fore-Words
We are pleased to publish the second issue of the first serial academic publication devoted exclusively to the works of Christopher Marlowe. We solicit essays on scholarly topics directly related to the author and his role in the literary culture of...
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Men (Don't) Leave: Aeneas as Departing Husband in Dido, Queen of Carthage
The retelling of book 4 of Virgil's epic, sometimes attributed to Thomas Nashe as well as Christopher Marlowe, shows Dido and Carthage making legitimate claims on Aeneas and him willing to answer them, somewhat begrudgingly: "I fain would go, yet beauty...
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"Poore Schollers": Education and Frustration in Hero and Leander
Inopem me copia fecit.(My plentie makes me poore.)The tragic phrase of Ovid's Narcissus, translated by Arthur Golding in 1567, is commonly understood as a reflection on the trials of excessive beauty teamed with excessive self-love.1 But for a frustrated...
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Embodied Texts and Textual Bodies in Doctor Faustus
Doctor Faustus is fascinated by the interplay of words and the world. This is evident in the books that surround Faustus as he speaks his first lines and his last, and in the plot of magic utterances, a fatal promise and the impossible words of repentance....
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Marlowe's Ars Moriendi
The late medieval ars moriendi (art of dying) fascinated early modern English playwrights. It was related to the danse macabre tradition in Western art represented in painting, statuary, and even dramatic spectacles, as John Carpenter's civic mural Dance...
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Marlowe's Influence and "The True History of George Scanderbeg"
Christopher Marlowe's influence on the spate of conqueror plays of the 1590s that mimicked the language, sense of spectacle, or antihero of Tamburlaine the Great has been well documented.1 Strangely, the story of Scanderbeg, the man whose name is most...
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"Raving, Impatient, Desperate, and Mad": Tamburlaine's Spectacular Collapse
The second part of Tamburlaine the Great., often read as the inferior sequel, continues Christopher Marlowe's visual meditation on how meaningful shows can be used to build an empire while illustrating dramatically how those same shows can destabilize...
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"False and Fraudulent Meanes"? Representing the Miraculous in the Works of Christopher Marlowe
That Moyses made the Jewes to travell xl yeares in the wildernes (which jo[»]rney might have bin done in lesse than one yeare) ere they came to the promised land to thp] intent that those who were privy to most of his subtilties might perish and so an...
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The "Hyperbolical Blasphemies" of Nashe and Marlowe in Late Tudor England
On the final two leaves of his copy of John Leland's Principum, ac illustrium aliquot <& eruditorum in Anglia virorum Encomia (1589), Thomas Nashe wrote, "Faustus: Che sara sara devinytie adieu." His name is penned inside the front cover, and...
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No. 1, 2011

Fore-Words
We are proud to launch a historic enterprise, the first serial academic publication devoted exclusively to the works of Christopher Marlowe. We solicit essays on scholarly topics directly related to the author and his role in the literary culture of...
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The Publication Date of Marlowe's Massacre at Paris, with a Note on the Collier Leaf
The title page of the first and only early printed edition of The Massacre at Pans (STC 17423),1 a common octavo, reads:The | MASSACRE | AT PARIS: | With the Death of the Duke | of Guise. | As it was plaide by the right honourable the | Lord high Admirall...
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The 1663 Doctor Faustus and the Royalist Marlowe
Over the past fifty years, the 1663 Doctor Faustus has been the most critically neglected of the pre-1700 editions of Christopher Marlowe's work.1 An examination of its publisher's career and the changes made to its text strongly suggest, against what...
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"Cursèd Necromancy": Marlowe's Faustus as Anti-Catholic Satire
While the corpus of religious criticism on Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus is among the most contradictory and most rabidly contentious in Elizabethan drama, it has focused overwhelmingly on one question: whether the play endorses or subverts religious...
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A Storm Brewing: Inspirations for the Tempest in Marlowe and Jonson
The Tempest so effectively invites comparison with William Shakespeare's earlier works that we may underestimate another sense in which it can be seen as retrospective or even nostalgic: in its evocations of the work of other playwrights, and in particular...
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Mars or Gorgon? Tamburlaine and Henry V
Let him forever go!-Let him not, Charmian,Though he be painted one way like a Gorgon,The other way's a Mars.(Antony and Cleopatra, 2.5.117-19)Early modern audiences were fascinated with dramas that presented multiple views of reality, like the perspective...
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Playing with Matches: Christopher Marlowe's Incendiary Imagination
In the subtitle of her novel Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus (1818), Mary Shelley imaginatively associates an obvious Faustfigure, in the shape of Frankenstein himself, with the myth of Prometheus. More recently, Park Honan, in his biography of...
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Christopher Marlowe and the Verse/Prose Bilingual System
We think of Christopher Marlowe as a poet and a rebel. Each of these identities is self-evident, yet when taken together they tend to obscure one of his lasting accomplishments. If he was a masterful writer of verse and a radical in many ways, Marlowe...
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Alleyn Resurrected
This essay makes four closely related claims, not one of which is in itself particularly surprising, but which together might constitute a useful intervention into scholarly imaginings and theorizations of early modern acting. First, Edward Alleyn was...
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Shades of Marlowe
Christopher Marlowe's body was barely cold before the English began to tell ghost stories about him. Derided by his enemies as a filthy playmaker, he was apotheosized as a translunary poet by George Peele, George Chapman, Thomas Nashe, Michael Drayton,...
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Christopher Marlowe Studies: Bibliography, 2000-2009
This bibliography covers the ten years from 2000 through 2009 and lists 456 books and articles that focus in some direct way on Christopher Marlowe's life and works. With two exceptions, student-oriented materials and texts for classroom use have been...
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Marlowe's Minions: Sodomitical Politics in Edward II and the Massacre at Paris
Christopher Marlowe's minions are complex, ambiguous figures that warrant scrutiny because they demonstrate something particular about the intersection between politics and same-sex desire in his plays. Although his historical tragedies engage early...
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