Literature in the Early American Republic

Articles

Vol. 7, 2015

Preface
Wayne Franklin, University of ConnecticutJason Berger, University of HoustonWITH the publication of this volume, we are happy to begin our shared editorship of Literature in the Early American Republic (LEAR). We inherit a promising and well-established...
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Cooper's the Prairie as a Southern Tale
"A miserable land must that be where they fetter the mind as well as the body, and where the creatures of God, being born children are kept so by the wicked inventions of men. . . ."The Trapper, in James Fenimore Cooper, The Prairie: A Tale (1827)WESTERN...
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"The Injustice of Her Father": Interrogating Patriarchy and Shifting Power in Sedgwick's A New-England Tale
WHEN Catharine Maria Sedgwick launched her career in 1822 with A New-England Tale; or, Sketches of New-England Character and Manners, she wrote in the preface of this anonymous work that her intentions were to "add something to the scanty stock of native...
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A History of Violence: Narrating "The Destruction of the Pequods" in Timothy Dwight's Greenfield Hill (1794)
. . . There were about foure hundred soules in this Fort, and not above five of them escaped out of our hands. Great and dolefull was the bloudy sight to the view of young souldiers that never had beene in Warre, to see so many soules lie gasping on...
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Catharine Maria Sedgwick's "A Slave Story I Began and Abandoned"
IN "'A Slave Story I Began and Abandoned': Sedgwick's Antislavery Manuscript," Karen Woods Weierman discusses a very interesting manuscript written by Catherine Maria Sedgwick sometime during the 1830s and housed amongst the Sedgwick Family Papers at...
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Catholic-Indian Crossings in Hobomok and Hope Leslie
IN Lydia Maria Child's Hobomok: A Tale of Early Times (1824) and Catharine Maria Sedgwick's Hope Leslie; Or, Early Times in Massachusetts (1827), the politics of gender and race go hand in hand. Scholars have convincingly shown how these stories of miscegenation...
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Horatio Greenough, "The Cooper Monument," and Form and Function
The TextWE initiate this new occasional "Archive" feature of LEAR by reprinting an important document from the history of modern aesthetics, with a contextual foreword by this journal's co-editor, Wayne Franklin. The reprinted item, first written by...
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"The Cooper Monument" (1852)^Sup 21^
IT is useless to regret that discussions of principles involve, to a certain extent, persons also. If this were not, on the whole, a good arrangement, principles would have been furnished with a better lodging. I take it, that passions and interests...
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Vol. 6, 2014

"A Rash, Thoughtless, and Imprudent Young Man": John Ward Fenno and the Federalist Literary Network
IN December 1798, on yet another cold night in Philadelphia, John Ward Fenno was startled by rustling about the porch step of his home on Chestnut Street. "There came last night to my House two ruffians," he wrote the next day in his paper, the Gazette...
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Maternal Fathers; or, the Power of Sympathy: Phillis Wheatley's Poem to and Correspondence with "His Excellency General Washington"
WRITING to George Washington from Providence, Rhode Island, on 26 October 1775, Phillis Wheatley acknowledged the "freedom" she had taken by directly addressing him in a letter in which she also enclosed her poem "To His Excellency General Washington."1...
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Disturbing Hunting Grounds: Negotiating Geocultural Change in the Western Narratives of George Catlin and Washington Irving
WHEN the speaker of William Cullen Bryant's "The Prairies" (1834) comes upon the midwestern "gardens of the Desert," he imagines the landscape as both a canvas and a palimpsest. The poem is framed by an acknowledgment of the speaker's status as an American...
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Agrarian Gothic: Carwin, Class Transgression, and Spatial Horrors in Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland
IN describing American visions of agrarianism, several adjectives have been used by early American authors and contemporary scholars. "Horrifying" is not often one of those adjectives. Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland; or the Transformation. An American...
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Wieland, Illustrated: Word and Image in the Early American Novel
CHARLES Brockden Brown liked to draw. In his youth, he sketched out designs for towers, stairs, doors, windows, courtyards, rooms, closets, walkways, halls, multistoried buildings, single-story buildings, campus plans, and gardens, and he embellished...
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James Fenimore Cooper, American English, and the Signification of Aristocracy in a Republic
THE American Revolution severed long-standing ties with an entitled and privileged Old World aristocracy. The upheaval that resulted saw significant political, social, economic, and cultural changes in the New World. Even the common language was affected....
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Patriotism and Caste in the Chainbearer: Cooper's Fifth Revolutionary War Novel
"You t'ink, sah, dis part of 'e country been talk too much lately 'bout Patty Rism and 'e country, sah?""I am afraid Patty has been overdone here, as well as in most other counties." (1:30)"It's on equity, I want to put this very matter, Major-I know...
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Foreign Friendship: James Fenimore Cooper and America's International Origins
JAMES Fenimore Cooper's novels-famous for their pairings of Indians and European Americans-also represent numerous affiliations among Americans and English, French, Dutch, and African characters, among others. In his Revolutionary War stories, sea tales,...
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Cooper's Revision of Paradise Lost and of Romantic Satanism in the Last of the Mohicans
INTERPRETERS have long recognized Paradise Lost (1667) as a source for The Last of the Mohicans (1826), but they have underestimated the complexity of the ways in which Cooper adapts this source, and therefore the sophistication of Cooper's commentary...
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Narratives of Extinction: James Fenimore Cooper and the Last Man
"THOU wilt here read of the acts of the extinct race." Although this declaration comes from the narrator of Mary Shelley's apocalyptic novel The Last Man, published in January 1826, it could have easily appeared in the preface to another novel published...
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Preface
THE sixth volume of our award-winning Literature in the Early American Republic: Annual Studies on Cooper and His Contemporaries (LEAR) is complete, and we are very pleased to present ten original essays penned by seasoned veterans and a bevy of talented...
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