Studies in Philology

Grounded in a long history of scholarly excellence as one of the first journals of literary criticism in the United States, Studies in Philology publishes articles on all aspects of British literature from the Middle Ages through Romanticism and articles on relations between British literature and works in the classical, Romance, and Germanic languages.

Articles from Vol. 114, No. 1, Winter

Allegorical Analogies: Henry More's Poetical Cosmology
As a young fellow at Cambridge, Henry More wrote a collection of long allegorical poems that were first published in 1642. More's poems are "Philosophicall Poems" in title and content; they are also Spenserian allegories. This article explores the...
Heroic Friendship in Dryden's Troilus and Cressida
This essay reconsiders John Dryden's Troilus and Cressida, Or Truth Found Too Late as part of Dryden's larger project of heroic plays, specifically as plays designed to instruct his "betters" at court on matters of ethics and public policy. Troilus...
Local Communities and Central Power in Shakespeare's Transnational Law
This essay uses William Shakespeare's Measure for Measure, based on a novella by Gimbattista Giraldi Cinzio, to examine what it means for Shakespeare to stage narratives engaged in Italian Roman law within England's common law system. The essay analyzes...
On Judges and the Art of Judicature: Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 2
In the late sixteenth century; the common law experienced a phenomenal growth, both in the number of practitioners and jurisdictional power. A comparison of popular and professional literature on legal administration or judicature reveals the complex...
"Some Other Kind of Lore": Satire and Self-Governance in Spenserian Poetry
This article investigates William Browne's use of a poem by the medieval poet Thomas Hoccleve as a tribute to his imprisoned fellow poet George Wither. It argues that Hoccleve's self-referential poem-sequence The Series plays a wider role in Browne's...
Violence, Excess, and the Composite Emotional Rhetoric of Richard Coeur De Lion
This article offers a reappraisal of the Middle English romance Richard Coeur de Lion in light of its composite nature, which, I suggest, provides grounds for a more critical reading of the eponymous hero's bellicose temperament and violent actions...
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