Studies in Philology

Grounded in a long history of scholarly excellence as one of the first journals of literary criticism in the United States, Studies in Philology publishes articles on all aspects of British literature from the Middle Ages through Romanticism and articles on relations between British literature and works in the classical, Romance, and Germanic languages.

Articles from Vol. 116, No. 4, Fall

A Song of Silence: Plaintive Dissonance and Neoteric Method in Spenser's Daphnaida
This study offers a new paradigm for reading Edmund Spenser's unusual elegy Daphnaida, a poem often considered aesthetically displeasing in its unsympathetic characterization, deferred consolation, and highly rhetorical style. This essay describes Daphnaida's...
A Widow's Will: Adapting the Duchess of Amalfi in Early Modern England and Spain
Clandestine marriage--the medieval institution of Christian marriage undertaken outside the recognition of legal authorities--was increasingly the object of anxiety and renegotiation in the early modern world. Its illicitness undermined marriage as a...
"Ech Good Gramarien Hath Power to Construe Scripture": Grammar and the Vernacular in the Theology of Reginald Pecock
This article argues that Reginald Pecock, fifteenth-century bishop of Chichester, calls upon his scholastic background to present a grammatical justification for a theological vernacular. However, in attempting to justify the vernacular, Pecock finds...
Henry Fielding's Last Bow at Colley Cibber
Variously lampooned as Marplay, Sir Farcical Comic, Ground Ivy, and Conny Keyber, Colley Cibber famously provided Henry Fielding with much comic fuel at the start of his career. Cibber was the crass authority figure against whom the rebellious youth...
"Love That Oughte Ben Secree": Secrecy and Alternate Endings in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde
This article examines the power dynamics of erotic secret-keeping and revelation in Geoffrey Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde. Chaucer uses competing discourses of secrecy (fin'amors, romance, fabliau, and epic history) in order to draw attention to the...
Music at the Close: Richard II in the Elizabethan Anthologies
The dying words spoken by John of Gaunt have a long afterlife: as sententious lines bound to catch the eye of a commonplacing reader, they seem almost designed to appear outside their dramatic setting, in manuscript and printed compilations. This essay...
Typology, Politics, and Theology in Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes
This article contends that John Milton's use of reverse typology to connect Samson Agonistes and Paradise Regained has both theological precedent and historical implications. Reformed exegesis and Arianism provide theological contexts through which to...
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