Tamkang Review

Articles

Vol. 49, No. 1, December

Editor's Note
While we are busy proofreading the articles for this issue, Taiwan is being gripped by the alarming prospect of an African swine fever outbreak brought on by contaminated pork products from China. Although the virus does not affect humans, an outbreak...
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Foreword
In 2016, when I served as the editor of Tamkang Review, Professor Emily Shu-hui Tsai proposed a special issue on Deleuze. Professor Tsai's proposal was approved at the editorial meeting on November 11, 2016. I appreciate her efforts and initiative....
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Ocean or Oubliette?
There is now enough plastic in the world to wrap the entire planet. Since the end of WW2 five billion tonnes of plastic has been produced and it is expected that by the end of this century the total output will exceed 30 billion tonnes. Plastic is...
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Animal Poverty: Agamben, Heidegger, and Whitehead
In The Open: Man and Animal, Giorgio Agamben structures the relationship between man and animal according to his thesis concerning what he calls "the anthropological machine" (33-38). What kind of machine? In fact, the polis itself is the privileged...
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Deleuze, Technology, and Thought
Although Gilles Deleuze never explicitly develops what might be considered a philosophy of technology, he is strongly influenced by thinkers such as Andre Leroi-Gourhan, Raymond Ruyer, and Gilbert Simondon, all of whom provide profound analyses of...
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For a World beyond Pigs and Dogs: Transversal Utopias-Guattari, le Guin, Bookchin
My intent is not reactionary, nor even conservative, but simply subversive. It seems that the Utopian imagination is trapped, like capitalism and industrialism and the human population, in a one-way future consisting only of growth. All I'm trying to...
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Coercion and Docility in Samuel Beckett's Rough for Radio II and What Where
"Restraint and coercion were sometimes unavoidable, but must always be exerted with the utmost tenderness." (Beckett, Murphy 91) In an interview with Charles Ruas in Death and the Labyrinth, Michel...
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Vol. 45, No. 2, June

"I Suppose It Is Not Sentimental Enough!": Evelina and the Power of Feeling
Is Frances Burney's Evelina (1778) an eighteenth-century sentimental novel? In the 1770s, when the adjective "sentimental" still retained its favorable sense of exhibiting refined feelings and moral virtue, the answer was an enthusiastic yes. (1) One...
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Troy in the Troilus and Criseyde
This paper is largely composed of two parts. The first part explores what Troy, whose image had undergone tremendous transformations since antiquity, meant to Chaucer and his contemporaries and how this palimpsest image fired the popular imagination...
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Time and Utopian Imagination in Murakami Haruki's Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World
I. Introduction This paper examines the utopian vision in Murakami Haruki's Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World (1985), a work of science fiction regarded by many as a representative contemporary Japanese anti-utopian novel. (2) This...
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Space and Memory in the Huashan Event
On the third weekend of September in 2014, Huashan 1914 Creative Park, previously the deserted Huashan Winery that dated back to Japanese colonization years, launched the "A Winery Tale: Huashan 100 Creative Exhibition" to celebrate the 100th year...
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Against the Western "Barbarian": Narrating Bodily Resistance in Early Nineteenth-Century China
Introduction Commercial, military, and political contentions between the closed-up late Qing China and expansionist Europe lasted over a century. A popular image from that interaction is one of a lethargic and enervated Oriental nation collapsing...
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Truly Living as a Woman: Sexual Politics in Alifa Rifaat and Nawal El Saadawi's Short Stories
At home she washes off the dust from the road performing her ablutions and praying before she eats. After she eats, she goes to sleep with God's book under her pillow. She wakes to the sound of her father's voice calling her to fix his food. After...
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Vol. 45, No. 1, December

Editor's Note
On December 13-14, 2013, the Tamkang University English Department was honored to host The Eleventh Quadrennial International Conference on Comparative Literature organized by the Comparative Literature Association of the Republic of China. The general...
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West of Eden: Carrying On
Am I the only one who found the title around which our Conference has been called together both enticing and also somewhat frightening? I don't mean this in any way as a critique: terror and comedy are both phenomena that we, as comparatists, but also...
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A Comparative Frame of Mind
Comparative Literature departments, like many other academic units in the humanities, are facing two sets of inter-related challenges in the present moment. One set is intellectual in nature and has to do with the field's changing self-understanding...
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The World According to Nishida Kitaro: A New Proposal
1 One of the problems of today's world is the aggressive way of solving conflicts, which is, in my opinion, more or less in accordance with Parmenidian logic and Hegelian dialectics. Hegel viewed conflicts of any kind as contradictions that are...
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An Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization: A Forum
This forum takes as its starting point Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's An Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization (2012), a text that has been the subject of much recent critical discussion. (1) Spivak's sprawling book, consisting of 25 chapters,...
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Aesthetic Education and Sympathetic Imagination
In this brief contribution to the forum, I sketch my sense of the role fiction can and indeed should play in contemporary education, thereby presupposing against the odds that the Humanities themselves will continue to have a place in the post-modern,...
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Figuring Globalization
In An Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak promotes a higher-education program of cosmopolitanism, in which humans are defined by the gregarious intention of being with the Other, and in which comparative literature...
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Aesthetic Education in an Era of Diminishing Expectation
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's An Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization lies between two kinds of writing on the humanities crisis, which is how I take it following an introduction that features the doleful hope that "perhaps the literary can...
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Problematics of Translation in Ha Jin's Poetry: Poet, Critic, Translator
A poem is what the reader lives through under the guidance of the text and experiences as relevant to the text. --Louise Rosenblatt Literature as Exploration It is not only the operation of translation that finds itself compromised; it is...
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Translation and World Literature in Goethe's West-East Divan
I. Introduction On July 25th, 1814, Goethe began a journey to the Rhine-Main area, where he was born and raised. It had been decades since Goethe visited his homeland after moving to Weimar to serve in the court of Carl August, Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach....
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Navigating between Shakespeare and Jingju: Wu Hsing-Kuo's Li er Zaici
Investigating Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's discussion of "minor" theatre, such as Carmelo Bene's Richard II and Antonin Artaud's Theatre of Cruelty, scholars in theatre and performance studies have advocated applying Deleuze and Guattari's concepts...
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Reception of Du Fu in the Anglophone World and the Issue of Poetic Transparency
Since the eleventh century, many scholars have claimed Du Fu (712-770) as China's greatest poet. However, by no means should the word "greatest" be taken as a given. Current existing materials suggest that Du Fu might have been less known during his...
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Vol. 44, No. 2, June

Situating Deleuze on Literature and Philosophy: Territories Distinct but Uncannily Analogous
How does one situate the thought of Gilles Deleuze (his own thought, as well as his collaborative writings with Felix Guattari)? On the one hand, the reader of his works is struck by the breadth of the topics surveyed (philosophy, literature, political...
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Vibration, Singularity, Event: Deleuze and Badiou on Poetic Language
Alain Badiou talks about poetry more often and explicitly than does Gilles Deleuze. He situates philosophy in relation to four "truth conditions"--science, love (desire), art (poetry) and politics--and is more concerned than Deleuze with the historical...
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The Zerrissenheit of Subjectivity
Vignette It is barely six o'clock in the morning in Tokyo and an already jam-packed line commuter train is arcing its way routinely across the massively distributed metropolitan area. Exhausted passengers are jostling for a tiny modicum of personal...
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Gilles Deleuze and Daisaku Ikeda: Between Immanence and Buddha-Nature
Introduction Immanence is probably one of the most important concepts in Deleuze's philosophy. Deleuze is known for having pursued immanence throughout his philosophical career and this has sometimes been contrasted with other thinkers such as Derrida,...
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The Smooth and Striated Spaces of Hiroshige
Introduction The artist Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858) is one of the best known Japanese ukiyo-e (floating world) artists. This reputation relies almost exclusively on his landscape print series. A fascinating aspect of some of these images is how...
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Creative Immanence, Affects and Cetacean Imagination: A Deleuzian Reading of Hung-Chi Liao's Ocean Writing
It should be said of all art that, in relation to the percepts or visions they give us, artists are presenters of affects, the inventors and creators of affects. (What Is Philosophy? 175) The famous Taiwanese prose writer Hung-Chi Liao was born...
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Autopoiesis in P. K. Page's "Arras": The Peacock Image as a Vision Machine
"Arras" is one of the most complex poems in the artwork of Canadian modernist P(atricia) K(athleen) Page. (1) It involves the poet's exploitation of an entangled relation between a poem as an object and a poet's vision as represented in forms of subjectification....
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Deleuze's Ethology: Plane of Immanence and the Impersonal
Deleuze's Ethology, (1) Plane of Immanence and the Impersonal Our notions of ecology, for the most part, stop at environmental activism concerned with how to decrease pollution, develop new energy sources, and protect scarce materials. Moreover,...
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Bosom Friends in the Red Chamber: Women's Friendship Poetry in Late Imperial China
Introduction The lonely woman longing for her absent (male) lover in an exquisite boudoir is a popular image constructed by male literati writers in their verse. However, lyric poems on friendship exchanged between gentry women writers in the seventeenth...
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Editor's Note
It is our great honor to announce the publication of this special issue on the theme "Creative Assemblages." This special issue was initiated by The First International Deleuze Studies in Asia Conference, which was hosted by the English Department...
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Vol. 44, No. 1, December

Too Much to Digest: The Irresistible Voice in Contemporary Gothic Metal
Ingestion concerns the preservation not only of the material body, but also of the symbolizing language which demarcates and regulates the consuming body as well as the consumed food. Through accepting food or rejecting it, or denying it--repulsing...
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Power, Politics, and Culture: An Interview with Edward W. Said
Shan: You are such a prolific writer and you have published several books since I last interviewed you in April 1998, including Power, Politics and Culture: Interviews with Edward W. Said, which just came out this month. Said: Last week. Shan:...
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Maternity and Mourning with Queenship in Shakespeare's Henry VI
When the death march of Henry V's funeral opens 1 Henry VI (1H6), the Duke of Bedford's lamentation is telling: "Instead of gold, we'll offer up our arms--/Since arms avail not now that Henry's dead" (1.1.46-47). (1) With Henry VI still an infant and...
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Humanizing the Monsters: A Schematic Reading of Beowulf
The main plot of Beowulf is based on a trio of fights between Beowulf, who is the hero, and three monsters. Although Beowulf is the protagonist, the three antagonists possess more human characteristics than the hero. Differences in the nature of the...
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Between the Acts of Peace and Polemos: Eros, History, and Jan Patocka
Look at ourselves, ladies and gentlemen! Then at the wall; and ask how's this wall, the great wall, which we call, perhaps miscall, civilization, to be built by orts, scraps and fragments like ourselves? (Between the Acts) Between the Acts (1941)...
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Flaneuse or Innocent: Blind Women in Chinese-Language Visual Culture in the New Millennium
This article focuses on representative texts in Chinese-language visual culture in the first years of this new millennium: the films Happy Times [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (China, Zhang Yimou [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 2000); The Eye [TEXT...
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Wallace Stevens and the American Sublime
Wallace Stevens and the American Sublime * Discussing the postmodern sublime, Jean-Francois Lyotard argues against what he sees as a Western "presupposition, or even a prejudice, a ready-made attitude" toward the connection between the sublime and...
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Vol. 43, No. 2, June

Editor's Note
In the past forty years, contributions tackling various topics in Tamkang Review have taken us through a wide range of scenarios of the academic development in Taiwan, from East-West comparative studies to the complex relationship between literary...
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Plowing in the Bedroom, Braying at the Table: Competition and Control in the Tang Tale "Banqiao San Niangzi"
"Banqiao San niangzi" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Third Lady of Plank Bridge) (1) is an exceptional tale from the Tang [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (618-907) collection Hedong ji [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], by Xue Yusi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE...
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"Time Junky": Shamanic Journeyings and Gnostic Eschatology in the Novels of William S. Burroughs
The Shaman as Con Artist William S. Burroughs's space age and, at the same time, Wild West version of the Gnostic mythos is at all points informed by shamanic praxis, however recuperated by the novelist in twisted, Western terms such as drug addiction...
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The Gothic Traveler: Generic Transformations in Lafcadio Hearn and Angela Carter
Let us imagine the following: for a long time I have lived within a foreign culture and this has made me conscious of my own identity; at the same time, it sets this identity in motion. I can no longer subscribe to my "prejudices" as I did before,...
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"Pearls of Eloquence": Hesperides, or the Muses' Garden as a Herald of Canon Formation
The two extant versions of the manuscript commonplace book Hesperides, or the Muses' Garden (Folger MS V.b.93 and its related manuscripts at Folger and in Stratford-on-Avon) were compiled by John Evans around the 1650s and 1660s under the commission...
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Decomposing the Authoritative Author: Truth and Confession in J. M. Coetzee's Foe and Summertime
I. Introduction: Polemic of the Classic and Canonicity In a lecture titled "What Is Classic?," given in Graz, Austria, in 1991, Coetzee discusses T S. Eliot's ambivalent choice in his English identity and literary progenitors, as well as J. S. Bach's...
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"Every Noise Appals Me": Macbeth's Plagued Ear
Woe to the prince that pliant ear inclines And yields his mind to poisonous tale that floweth From flattering mouth! --Gorboduc (2.2.103-05) Shakespeare's Macbeth is a tale "full of sound and fury," a play full of the clamor, the noise of war...
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Vol. 43, No. 1, December

Run through the Jungle: Uncanny Domesticity and the Woman of Shame in Jessica Hagedorn's Dream Jungle
In colonial discourses, the jungle has been a symbol of primitive force as well as a location of imperialist conquest. Once incorporated into the chronology of modernization, the jungle is inevitably rendered the metaphor of quintessential Otherness...
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On Sophocles's Philoctetes 1409-44: Heracles Ex Machina, Pathos, and Aporia
Introduction Sophocles's Philoctetes features the theme of persuasion through highlighting how Odysseus manages to recall the deserted general Philoctetes back to the battlefield. At first, Neoptolemus, following Odysseus's instructions, attempts...
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W. B. Yeats, Cultural Nationalism, and Disempowered Women
Introduction For centuries Ireland's traditional bards had been glorifying women through idealized, mythopoeic woman-figures which misrepresented actual women. They had done this in order to urge their countrymen to help liberate their nation and...
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A Search for Home: Displacement in King Lear
In Gaston Bachelard's The Poetics of Space, home is defined as both a physical and a mental space for human beings to shelter in, and a locus for further imaginings of warmth and coziness: The house...is a privileged entity for a phenomenological...
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The Ethical Reconfiguration of the Body in Philip Roth's Exit Ghost
Introduction Exit Ghost (2007), claimed to be the last of Philip Roth's Zuckerman novels, portrays Nathan Zuckerman in his senility and serious illness coming back to New York for medical treatment. However, what first appears intriguing about the...
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A Negative Poetics: Desire and Death in the Xiuxiang Jin Ping Mei
Death is the sanction of everything that the storyteller can tell. Walter Benjamin Introduction As we know, the novel Jin Ping Mei utilizes three textual systems: known as the Jin Ping Mei cihua [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (alternatively...
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Vol. 42, No. 2, June

Declaring Whales' Rights
Whales learn and live in ways that previously have only been identified as "human" Hal Whitehead (1) Essentially, the brains of primates and cetaceans arrived at the same cognitive space while evolving along quite different paths Lori Marino...
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Species in a Planetary Frame: Eco-Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and the Cove
The provocative title for this issue of Tamkang Review--"Cetacean Nations"--offers an opportunity to take account of emerging directions for the recent outpouring of critical work on species and "the animal question." The anti-anthropocentrism of this...
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The Asia-Pacific in Asian American Transmigration: Lydia Minatoya's the Strangeness of Beauty
There's a myth about immigrants: that we come on the wings of our dreams. For most the tale is too simple, turning convoluted personal motivations into a kind of cliche. --Lydia Minatoya, The Strangeness of Beauty 29 Arising in alliance with...
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Gardening Ideas across Borders: Mobilities and Sustainability in Leslie Marmon Silko's Gardens in the Dunes
Travel writing in Western literature has been a genre predominated by male characters, sexist ideology, and colonial desire. In The Mind of the Traveler, Eric J. Leed calls traveling a "gendering activity" that highlights a sexist opposition: "There...
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Introduction: Cetacean Nations
Dead body on the beach. Female. Suspected poisoning. No signs of struggle, but vaginal bleeding. Who is responsible for this crime? How will the perpetrators be punished? How do these questions shift if we read this body as "animal"? What happens,...
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Animal Contact in Liu Ka-Shiang's He-Lien-Mo-Mo the Humpback Whale
When it comes to nature writers in Taiwan, Liu Ka-shiang is definitely the one who cannot possibly be ignored. His work has been acclaimed as "the epitome of the history of Taiwan nature writings" (Huang Tsung-chieh 286), and he is "the most representative...
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Japanese Whaling and the Language of Science
In 1987 the International Whaling Commission (IWC) imposed a moratorium on commercial whaling. This was prompted by the decline in whale populations but also the widely held view in different countries that it is morally unacceptable to kill whales....
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Beauty and the Enchanted Beast: The Narwhal (Monodon Monoceros) in the Canadian Cultural Landscape
Introduction This essay explores a historic review of the narwhal in human culture, and examines the extent to which this cetacean is linked with the Canadian populations' oceanic identity. Moreover, through the examination of popular stories, myths...
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Vol. 42, No. 1, December

Bodies That Matter: How Does a Performer Make Himself/herself a Dilated Body?
What is a "body"? The entire material or physical structure of a human organism? The flesh as opposed to the spirit/mind/soul? An endless weaving together of singular tissues, organs, or states, each of which is an integration of one or more impulses?...
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Who Is Sylvia or Who Are We?: Alternative Subjectivity in Albee's the Goat or, Who Is Sylvia?: Notes toward a Definition of Tragedy
"Did your food have a face?" a poster from the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) asks. This provocative statement invites consideration of how a bloody carcass is transformed into a delicacy: how cows become beef and pigs pork. The...
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Damning Damming Modernity: The Destructive Role of Megadams
For humanity water is required for everything from amniotic fluid to the hydration of the body, to the irrigation of crops, to the half a million gallons of water per minute that must flow to cool a nuclear power plant. Yet, of all of the water on...
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Wild Cosmopolitan Gardens: Some Notes towards a Cosmopolitan Sense of Place
"What will this place give me, do to me? What landscapes, what houses will it leave in my dreams? What layers will it add to the collage of my identity, my skin, my permanent passport?" (Morales 192) Much of this article concerns wishful thinking...
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Consuming Tibet: Imperial Romance and the Wretched of the Holy Plateau
In 1900, Arthur Conan Doyle, who created the myth of the famous detective Sherlock Holmes, perhaps due to his boredom with this cult figure, killed off his intelligent hero in a mortal combat with the arch-rival Professor Moriarty in the story of "The...
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The Reception of Modernity in East Asia: Japan in China's Encounter with the West
Introduction Modernity figured prominently in the encounter between East Asia and the West in modern times. The eagerness with which the West pried open the markets of China and Japan, the Opium War (1839-41) and Matthew Perry compelling the opening...
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Vol. 41, No. 2, June

Resisting Sympathy, Reclaiming Authority: The Politics of Representation in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
In "The Site of Memory," Toni Morrison traces her literary heritage back to nineteenth-century slave narratives and notices that in relating their experience, those narrators were "silent about many things" and "there was no mention of their interior...
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Shifting Alliances in Late Colonial Indonesia: Tionghoa Peranakan: Pre-War Novels
Well documented by many historians, the migration of Chinese from China to Southeast Asia or more academically known as the "Chinese disapora" has been variously thought to have begun in the middle of the seventeenth century, (1) with Lynn Pan dating...
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The Fisherman of Halicarnassus's Narratives of the White Sea (the Mediterranean): Translocal Subjects, Nonlocal Connections
The Fisherman of Halicarnassus is the pen name of Cevat Sakir Kabaagagli (1890-1973), Turkey's most environmentally oriented Modernist writer. His narratives of Akdeniz (White Sea), the Turkish name for the Mediterranean Sea, has brought Bodrum its...
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Critical Dystopia Reconsidered: Octavia Butler's Parable Series and Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake as Post-Apocalyptic Dystopias
"Critical dystopia" is the label attached to dystopian works after the 1980s. Given its efficacy in articulating the distinctive feature of the subgenre and its difference from canonical dystopia, a need for more nuanced reading of contemporary dystopian...
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Poetry of the Planet, by the Planet, and for the Planet: A Global Manifesto for Being Here
Ecosystem. The system formed by the interaction of all living organisms, plants, animals, bacteria, etc. with the physical and chemical factors of their environment. The varieties of meanings attached to the word by different ecologists ... reflects...
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The Future of Ecocriticism: Strategic Openness and Sustainability --an Interview with Scott Slovic
Yang Yingyu: Let's start by discussing the definition of ecocriticism. Compared with other definitions of ecocriticism, what characterizes your broader definition of ecocriticism? Scott Slovic: Let me repeat the definition I first composed in 1994...
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The Global Registers of Brokeback Mountain as a Place-Bound Story
Introduction Ang Lee's Brokeback Mountain (2005) (1) was a phenomenal success in many ways (2) and, most importantly, was well received in the global film market. (3) The widespread popularity of the film beckons us to look at the on-screen homosexual...
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Illness as Thinking in Virginia Woolf's Orlando
Introduction Dr. Cawley: "It used to be that the kind of patients we deal with here. [They] were shackled and left in their own filth. They were beaten. As if whipping them bloody would drive the psychosis out. We drove screws into their brains....
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Editors' Note
This issue contains a broad range of articles from scholars in film studies, cultural studies, and ecocriticism, prominently including innovative Deleuzean and postcolonial approaches to topics as well as entirely original methodologies. Many of the...
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