Policy Review

A bimonthly journal of the Hoover Institution that promotes inquiry into the American condition, American and other government and political and economic systems, and the role of the United States in the world. For the academic audience.

Articles from No. 72, Spring

A Farmer's Scarlet Letter: Four Generations of Middle-Class Welfare Is Enough
Crop subsidies for the 400-acre farm that we rent here in northwest Missouri average $10,000 a year, and I've gotten in the habit of spending it all. But Pat Roberts, congressman from Dodge City, Kansas, and the new chairman of the House Agriculture...
Big Bird Goes Cold Turkey: Public Broadcasting Can Flourish without Government Subsidies
When Bell Atlantic Chairman Ray Smith offered to help Congress find alternative sources of money to replace federal funding of public-television broadcasting, PBS supporters protested en masse. And when Jones Intercable--which already distributes adult-education...
Black Flight: Years of Liberal Government Drives Away D.C.'S Middle Class
Washington is a city of monuments. Its grandest and most expensive is a work still in progress, but nearing completion: the District of Columbia itself, which commemorates the ruin of American liberalism. The D.C. government is bankrupt today because...
Clinton's Cocaine Babies: Why Won't the Administration Let Us Save Our Children?
Nothing could be more heart-breaking than the sight of a baby born with an addiction to cocaine. There is very little doctors and nurses can do to ease the pain of these innocent newborns, whose mothers' use of hard, illegal drugs during pregnancy constitutes...
Coming after U: Why Colleges Should Fear the Accrediting Cartel
A tiny "Great Books" college in California, tucked away in a mountain meadow, would seem an unlikely minuteman in a struggle for the academic liberty of America's colleges, universities, and professional schools. But so it is. Thomas Aquinas College,...
Did Your Mom Eat Your Homework? Schools Shift the Blame for Academic Failure to Parents
Parents and politicians tend to blame the education establishment for the sorry state of learning in American public schools. The educrats are not taking this lying down. They've found their own scapegoat: parents. Public-school boosters have decided...
Fisher of Men: A Baltimore Minister Promotes Black Christian Manhood
The alienation of African-American men from the churches of their communities is perhaps the single greatest tragedy facing black America. "While 75 percent of the mosque is male, 75 percent of the black church is female," laments Jawanza Kunjufu, author...
Hire Education: An Affordable College That Sets the Standard for Career Training
Speaking in Galesburg, Illinois, in January, President Clinton proposed a federally funded job-training program "to keep the American Dream alive in the 21st century." Cost to American taxpayers: $3.5 billion a year. If he had driven about an hour north,...
Pride and Prejudice: Black Business Leaders Ask: Is It Time to Set Quotas Aside?
During the coming year, Americans will begin a serious debate over the meaning and value of affirmative action. Among the early signs: A proposed ballot initiative in California aims to amend the state constitution to prohibit preferential treatment...
The Courage of Our Convictions: The Abolition of Parole Will Save Lives and Money
On Father's Day 1986, Richmond Police Detective George Taylor stopped Wayne DeLong for a routine traffic violation. DeLong, recently released from prison after serving time for murder, shot and killed the policeman. Leo Webb was a divinity student at...
The Land of the Free Throw: A New York Basketball League Builds Community
The most popular outdoor basketball court in New York City is half the regulation size, offers no place to sit, and has sidelines bounded by a chain-link fence 20 feet high. Those who play here are literally encaged. Yet this ridiculously inadequate...
The Readiness Trap: The U.S. Military Is Failing to Prepare for the Next Big War
During the 1992 presidential race, the Fleetwood Mac song "Don't Stop Thinking About Tomorrow" became the official anthem of the Clinton campaign. Once in office, the new administration lost little time infusing every facet of its domestic agenda with...
The Unconstitutional Congress: The GOP Misses the Best Argument for Limiting Government
The framers of the Constitution were great clockmakers in the science of statecraft, and they did, with admirable ingenuity, put together an intricate machine, which promised to run indefinitely, and tell the time of the centuries. --James M. Beck,...
Thy Neighbor's Rap Sheet: How Do You Know Whether a Killer Lives Next Door?
On New Year's Eve 1975, after an evening of taking LSD and watching cop shows on television, 15-year-old Raul Meza showed up at a convenience store near his house in Austin, Texas, armed with a deer rifle. Meza emptied the cash register, then marched...
We Aren't the World: An Exit Strategy from U.N. Peacekeeping
Just the other day, it seems, the national debate about the U.S. role in the United Nations turned for the most part on the issue of money--on U.S. contributions and U.N. waste, and how reducing the former might diminish the latter. That issue remains....
Will These Women Clean House? GOP Freshman Lawmakers Back Congressional Reform
If 1992 was the "Year of the Woman" in American politics, then 1994 was the "Year of the Conservative Woman." Nine women incumbents--all liberal Democrats--lost their House seats in the November elections. Seven conservative Republican women were elected...
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