Sunset

Sunset Magazine is a magazine covering western homes, gardens, food and travel (five regional editions). Founded in 1898, it is a monthly publication published by Sunset Publishing Corp. Sunset Magazine subjects include home and gardening as well as travel and tourism. The senior vice president is Kevin Lynch.

Articles from Vol. 174, March

All That's Left of a 1913 Shipwreck
High winds and heavy seas dashed the foundering ship against the rocks, spilling her cargo and tearing a gaping hole amid-ships. As the ocean began to consume her, the 18-man crew abandoned her for shore. It was August 9, 1913, when the steam schooner...
Anytime Tarts
Delicious any time of the year, dried fruit tarts are particularly appropriate now, when there is less variety of fresh fruit at market than in other seasons. Using ingredients from California was the goal of chef Alan Fine, a transplant to San Francisco...
A Very Civilized Scottish Tea
a regional variation on a cherished British institution, this Scottish tea includes three national favorites: oatcakes, kipper pate, and shortbread. Our menu for lunch or late afternoon combines these staples in traditional recipes. It also includes...
Avocado Adventures
"I love that monster, even though it keeps us from living a normal life." So writes Al Kray about his bearing avocado tree in Glendale, California. Other home growers might agree: when an avaocado tree rewards you with a hefty crop, it's easy to overlook...
Bagels as Crispy Crackers ... or as French Toast
Two Toasting techniques give different but pleasing results when applied to dense, chewy bagels. For crisp crackers, slice bagels thinly, dry and lightly brown them in the oven, then butter and sprinkle with salt. Or split bagels, soak in milk and...
Blame It on the Road
Any way you work it, getting to Hana takes on the air of an expedition. And perhaps that's how it should be. Isolated on the eastern tip of Maui not so much by distance as by time and terrain, Hana is an island within an island: a fragment of rural...
Come Visit Us at Sunset's "Laboratory of Western Living."
Come visit us! Since our move here over 30 years ago, the home and gardens of Lane Publishing Co. in Menlo Park, California, have welcomed nearly two million people from all over the world. The low, rambling complex of three buildings is now headquarters...
Fresh in off the Prairie, It's Lisianthus
Prairie gentian, also called tulip gentian or Texas bluebell 7Eustoma grandiflorum), broke upon the nursery scene so recently that the supply of plants outstripped available information about how to grow and use them. All the details aren't in yet,...
From Dinky Lawn to Alpine Meadow
"Nature paints in swaths of one plant, then another, and puts smidgens of them somewhere else," says landscape architect John Herbst. He followed that observation to create the look of an alpine meadow when remodeling the front of his house in Lake...
If a Nepal Trekker Had a Microwave
Take a hearty lentil stew, pair it with steaming rice, and you have the backbone of daal-bhaat, often cited as the national dish of Nepal. Traditional accompaniments are simmered vegetables, meat--usually in small portions--and at least one type of pickle...
In Spain's Northwest Corner, Cool and Ancient Galicia
Jutting into the Atlantic Ocean, the region of Galicia has the rainiest summers on the Iberian Peninsula, and the Galicians are cousins to the fair-skinned Bretons, Welsh, and Scots. The cathedral town of Santiago de Compostela is the draw for most...
Kitchen Remodeler's Question: Which Counter Surface?
Chop on it, knead on it, serve from it: you ask a lot, every day, of your kitchen counter. Selecting a counter surface is an important decision, whether you're building a new kitchen or remodeling. No one material is best for all purposes, but each...
Leg-Stretchers for the Season's First Hike
While the high country is still locked in snow, California's coastal mountains are spring green, their trails lined with wildflowers. If you're planning to do some mountain backpacking this summer, it's not too soon to start trail-toughening your legs...
March Menus: A Hurry-Up Brioche Brunch, a Curry without Mystery, Mushroom Soup for a Light Supper
Meals that go together quickly are the emphasis of menus this month. For a spring brunch, purchased brioches provide a quick way to dress up scrambled eggs. Make preparation of curry less complex by adding the seasonings to the rice and baking the chicken...
Metal or Bamboo? and Other Questions to Ask about Rakes
Whether you use them to move debris or soil or to remove thatch, rakes are a basic tool in the gardener's arsenal. Garden centers and nurseries offer more choices than ever in rakes to help you with different tasks. Here we display the various types...
On the Desert or in Your Dining Room, an Arizona Barbecue for 6 to 16
As the Arizona sun sets, candles and luminarias light the way to this outdoor dinner party. In the Southwest's low desert, mild March nights are favorite times for such outdoor entertaining. Elsewhere in the West, where fair March weather is less predictable,...
Pasta-Making May Tangle You Up at First. but You'll Soon Get the Hang of It
You must have noticed that pasta--once a faintly comic, faintly ethnic vaudeville turn among foods--has become a class act. The noodle, at last, is nouveau. One reason: the varied shapes that were sold only in Italian specialty markets can now be...
Pastry Rafts or Standing Tall ... Three Ways to Enjoy Asparagus
Open dinner with spring's harvest of asparagus. Cook the bright green stalks lightly and serve with simple elegance. Here are three ways to go: the first is an appetizer to eat with your fingers, the others are knife-and-fork presentations. Asparagus...
Polenta Triangles and Creamy Potatoes ... They Are Dinner "Go-Withs." (Recipes)
Once you've settled on the principal protein for dinner, then you need to decide what will go with it. Here are two choices with some surprising dimensions. The first is well-seasoned pan-browned polenta; it's flecked with cooked vegetables. the...
Robot Rendezvous
Robots acting in skits, a train floats above its track, a 75- by 120-foot television screen, buildings shaped like mountains and machines: these are some of the electronic wizardries and architectural marvels exhibited at Tsukuba Expo 1985, Japan's $3-billion...
Salads, Rice and Beans ... All with a Southwest Touch
The Southwest touch with Mexican seasonings gives a fresh taste to these salads and side dishes. Designed as part of the desert picnic menu pictured on pages 108 and 109, these dishes are also well suited to family meals. When part of the complete...
Seed Time for a Hot Pepper Summer
For a searing taste experience, try eating hot peppers that you grow in your garden this summer. Start seeds indoors now, so that these warm-weather vegetables will have a head start on the growing season. Nurseries usually have a fairly good selection...
Shattery and Crip, They Are Fried Fresh Leaves
Fired leaves? A bit outlandish, perhaps, but surprisingly delicious. Dropped into hot oil, leaves of spinach, mustard, watercress, cilantro, mint, and parsley very quickly turn crisp, translucent, and intensely green. These fragile, shattery fried...
Sleeping under the Trees ... with a Bedroom Skylight
A skylight over the bed? Ask anyone who has one and you're likely to hear resounding approval. For many homeowners, the most obvious reason is the pleasure of sky-watching in bed. Says Betty Norrie of Portland, whose bedroom is pictured above left,...
Speedy Shellfish ... Scallops, Shrimp, and Oysters in a Microwave
Speed and simplicity: that's what a microwave oven gives to shellfish cookery in these three main dishes for two. Because you work with small portions, foods cook evenly and quickly. Each dish combines vegetables or pasta with the fish. You might...
Starting with Wine-Simmered Turkey
Simmering a whole turkey is a technique worth using when you want an economical supply of moist, tender meat. You can keep a supply in the refrigerator for a few days, or store it in the freezer. As a bonus, you get several quarts of rich, flavorful...
The Most Pungent Horseradish? Grow Your Own. It's Easy
To get the most pungent horseradish--the best, according to aficionados--you start with fresh horseradish root. Supermarkets occasionally sell fresh roots, but horseradish, though a coarse and rather weedy-looking plant, is easy to grow. At a nursery,...
The New Rowing Shells ... Stronger, More Stable, Easier to Learn With
"This is the rebirth of the whole recreational rowing world," says Gordon Nash, a boat builder in Sausalito. He's speaking of the new generation of rowing shells that are cutting sleek wakes in northern California waterways. Stronger, wider, and more...
There's Buried Treasure in This Mediterranean Bread ... Green and Black Olives
Throughout the Mediterranean region, where olive trees abound and the fruit is a diet staple, hearty loaves of bread studded with olives are widely found. In Venice, Italy, we came across this golden version, with its random scattering of sharp-flavored,...
These Are Add-On Soups from Vietnam
The liquid comes last when you dish up these light and lean Vietnamese-style dinner soups. One is based on meat-filled cabbage rolls; the other is chicken noodle with a fresh twist. A tureen holds steaming, flavorful broth. Other ingredients--meat,...
Up from Cabo San Lucas, Almost 50 Newly Paved Miles
Road runners pedal furiously across your asphalt path; vultures and hawks perch on roadside cactus. Along the western horizon, are after sweeping arc of solitary beach is punctuated by rocky outcrops that drop steeply into the surf. This is the scene...
We Borrow a Sauce Secret from Mexico: Chocolate
Dark chocolate is the secret ingredient in this meat sauce. A small amount of bitter, unsweetened chocolate is melted into the pan juices, enhancing the sauce with a rich flavor, deep color, and luxurious texture. Echoing the spirit of the Mexican...
When Your Avocado Tree Runs into Trouble
More than 300 readers recently shared their avocado-growing experiences with Sunset (see pages 118 to 123). A few reported problems. Here's a look at avocado troubles and what to do about them. Premature fruit or flower drop Some friut and flower...
Why Prune Camellias? for More Flowers, for a Better Shape
Many gardeners don't think of pruning as part of regular camellia care. But Rudy Moore, the horticulturist responsible for the camellias at Huntington Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California, says removing dead wood and unproductive branches improves...
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