Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 1, Spring

A Clash of Globalizations: Obstacles to Development in the Middle East. (Development and Modernization)
Issues of international development took center stage at the 2002 (UN-sponsored Johannesburg Summit, but the Middle East was virtually ignored in favor of partnerships with Africa and Central Asia. Indeed for the Middle East and North Africa, issues...
A Doomed Reform: North Korea Flirts with the Free Market. (World in Review)
After the fall of the Soviet Union, world politics shifted away from the conflict between communism and capitalism that had characterized much of the 20th century. But in northeast Asia lies one of the last relics of the Cold War and the last Stalinist...
A Flawed Blueprint: The Covert Politicization of Development Economics. (Development and Modernization)
At one time, dictatorships were believed to promote economic development, while development was believed to generate democracy. Combined, these views fostered a faulty prescription for international development and US foreign policy. Both of these...
A New Development Agenda: Outlining the Challenges to Development in the 21st Century. (Development and Modernization)
A Conversation with LOUISE FRECHETTE HARVARD INTERNATIONAL REVIEW: It has recently been suggested that there is a link between development and terrorism. How does development relate to sources of violence and unrest? Does this make development...
At a Crossroads: Kaliningrad's Fate. (Global Note Book)
Kaliningrad, an obscure Russian territory nestled between Poland and Lithuania, was part of East Prussia before World War II. Formerly known as Konigsberg, its name was changed to Kaliningrad when it was transferred to Russia after Germany's 1945 defeat....
A World Grown Old: Finding a Place for Antedeluvians in the New World Order. (Perspectives)
The results of the 2001 British census reveal that for the first time since the inaugural British census two centuries ago, the number of people over 60 now exceeds the number under 16. More than one million people are over 85--five times as many as...
Cleaning House: Dirty Bombs and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. (World in Review)
On June 10, 2002, USA Attorney General John Ashcroft announced the arrest of Abdullah al Muhajir, a US citizen who allegedly was planning a radiological weapon, or "dirty bomb," attack against the United States in collaboration with Al Qaeda. This...
Dealing with Debt: How to Reform the Global Financial System. (Development and Modernization)
Something is wrong with the global financial system. One might think the system would shift money from rich countries, where capital is in abundance, to those where it is scarce, while transferring risk from poor countries to rich ones, which are most...
Development as Poison: Rethinking the Western Model of Modernity. (Development and Modernization)
At the beginning of Annie Hall, Woody Allen tells a story about two women returning from a vacation in New York 's Catskill Mountains. They meet a friend and immediately start complaining: "The food was terrible," the first woman says, "I think they...
Duhalde's Dilemma: Argentina in Crisis. (Global Notebook)
Argentina's presidential elections are scheduled for April 27,2003. In theory, the elections represent an opportunity for Argentina to implement the political and economic changes necessary to reverse a four-year-long recession. But the circumstances...
Eyes Wide Open: On the Targeted Use of Foreign Aid. (Development and Modernization)
Conventional wisdom on international development holds that "the rich get richer while the poor get poorer." This saying does not capture exactly what bas happened between the rich and poor regions of the world over the past century, but it comes pretty...
Free and Fair: Elections in Kashmir. (Global Notebook)
Elections in India look more like religious festivals than political events as women with infants in their arms travel on pilgrimages from remote villages to urban voting booths. Thousands of people stand for hours in long lines to cast their votes....
In Media Res: Putin's Unfree Press. (Global Notebook)
Upon assuming office in January 2000, Russian President Yladimir Putin undertook major efforts to increase state ownership of the media and tighten restrictions on journalistic freedom. Some of these efforts have resulted in legislation via the...
Mightier Than the Sword: The Bush Administration's Flagging Human Rights Rhetoric. (End Paper)
For foreign policy observers, US President George Bush's human rights rhetoric strikes a chord distinctly reminiscent of the Reagan administration. First impressions, however, can be deceiving. With respect to human rights, the new policies coming...
More Things Considered: Kosovo, September 11, and Responsible Reporting. (Interview)
Melissa Block is host of National Public Radio's (NPR) All Things Considered. She has worked for NPR since 1985 and held various positions including director, producer, editor, and reporter. In addition to covering such notable domestic stories as...
Myanmar's Facade: Gestures of Democracy. (Global Notebook)
Close observers of Myanmar should know not to get their hopes up. In May 2002, the military regime in Yangon released Aung San Suu Kyi, leader of the opposition National League for Democracy (NLD), after 19 months of house arrest and demonstrated further...
NGOs and the New Democracy: The False Saviors of International Development
Conservatives and liberals agree that globalization is hastening civil Society's coming of age. Liberals consider civil society the only countervailing force against an unresponsive, corrupt state and exploitative corporations that disregard both environmental...
Olympian Efforts: How Ancient Games Shape the Modern World. (Perspectives)
A little more than a year ago, the world was anticipating the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City. The Winter Games were making their triumphant return to US mountains for the first time in 22 years. The winter sports season was producing great...
Reclaiming Eden: Biological and Cultural Conservationism. (Review Essays)
They are called paradises on earth, but all is not well in the protected areas of the world. Regions considered protected in government statistics and maps sometimes lack real protection in fact, while many of the protected areas that do exist face...
The Road to Development: Culture, Society, and Economic Growth. (Editor's Note)
In a world where millions of people live below the international poverty line, the debate over international economic development has profound and immediate significance. In recent years, optimism over neoliberal development programs has heralded economic...
Troubled Paradise: Galapagos's Bid for Survival. (Global Notebook)
Sailors called them "the enchanted isles" for their eerie appearance. In 1835, their extraordinary ecology helped inspire Charles Darwin to formulate his theory of evolution. But today, aggressive economic development threatens the islands' unique...
Untapped Potential: The Future of Russia's Oil Industry. (Perspectives)
For a number of years, US energy policy has encouraged the search for oil outside the country, but away from the Persian Gulf. This approach recognizes first that access to those areas of the United States considered geologically attractive, but out-of-bounds...

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