Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 3, Fall

Achieving Stability: Balance in the Draft Constitutional Treaty
Assessments of the European Union often argue that proposed changes respect or even enhance the crucial "balance" that has been carefully achieved among European institutions over the years. However, scrutiny reveals that at least three different forms...
Beyond New Europe: Does a Euro Curtain Exist?
Since September 11, 2001, there has been much talk regarding the potential clash between Christian and Islamic civilizations. But Harvard political scientist Samuel Huntington, the popularizer of the clash theory, focused as much attention on the potential...
Caging the Tiger: Ireland's Economy Roars On
The "Celtic Tiger" roared during the 1990s. The dot.com bubble, low taxation, and corporate-friendly legislation produced a boom economy in Ireland that lasted for a number of years. Recently, however, the growth has slowed, and the Celtic Tiger seems...
Climate Critique
David Victor and Joshua House ("A New Currency: Climate Change and Carbon Credits," Summer 2004) join a long list of critics who have become disenchanted with the international negotiations that led to the Kyoto Protocol. The Protocol ties its targets...
Conceiving a Grand Strategy: Focusing US Foreign Policy for a Revolutionary Age
GARY HART was elected US Senator from Colorado in 1974. As Co-Chair of the US Commission on National Security/21st Century, he warned of deficits in US homeland security and of the dangers of a terrorist attack with weapons of mass destruction. ...
Continental Shift
Across Europe, jubilant celebrations clash with glum moods in individual states. Low voter turnout and sparse understanding of institutions belie efforts toward transparency and engagement. The face of Europe is changing, and the emergent entity faces...
Facing Genocide: The Humanitarian Crisis in Sudan
The intricacies of international laws designed to preserve peace and human life can become self-defeating when emphasis is shifted from expediently enforcing the spirit of the law to debating its technicalities. This has been the case with the global...
Fighting Terror with Aid: Underlying Conditions That Foster Terrorism
The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the war on terrorism have brought the most fundamental changes to US security strategy since the beginning of the Cold War. "Defeating terrorism is our nation's primary and immediate priority," stated...
Followership and Discretion: Assessing the Dynamics of Modern Leadership
The nature and potential of leaders and leadership has long been a preoccupation of political activists and observers. Yet the complexity of present-day world affairs and the reduction of state authority by globalizing dynamics have made the analysis...
Globalizing Law: The ATCA out of the Attic
Alongside the proliferation of international treaties over the past half-century, an ongoing debate has grown in the United States over whether US courts should operate as part of an international system of law or remain an isolated entity. In a landmark...
Joining the Club: The Bread Basket of New Europe
Occupying a strategic location in the heart of central Europe, Poland is a developing state whose progress calls for close observation. The most populous country in Central Europe and the sixth most populous in the European Union, Poland has been the...
Marginal Power: Latin American Indigenous Revival
The experiences of Bolivia and Ecuador over the past few years highlight the strength of indigenous movements in Latin America today and the momentum such movements have gained since their rebirth in the 1980s. Long relegated either to the peasant...
New Comparative Advantages: A Re-Evaluation of State-Led Development
Both state-led and market-led approaches to development present substantial difficulties in implementation and costs. However, for a country striving for economic development and a better position in the international economy in the long run, the state-led...
Perpetuating the Rift: Joaquin Roy Reviews Allies at Odds? the United States and the European Union
Why, despite their professed similarity of goals, do the policy preferences of the European Union and the United States diverge on so many multilateral issues? This puzzling central question, posed by David Hannay, a former UK Ambassador to the United...
Political Realism: A Culprit for the 9/11 Attacks
In the summer of 2004, the US National Committee on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States ("the 9/11 Commission") released its final report explaining why the United States was blindsided by Al Qaeda on September 11, 2001, and what improvements...
Recovery through Reform: Culture Matters in the Thai Turnaround
On July 2, 1997, an economic shock in Thailand was felt around the world. Both the event itself and its causes confirm the interconnected nature of the global economy that Thomas Friedman described in his book The Lexus and the Olive Tree. The decision...
Resilient Islam: Muslim Controversies in Europe
Recently, public policy debates over the political accommodation of ethnic minorities of migrant origin in Europe have focused on Muslims. The real or perceived difficulties Muslims face in adapting to the Western societies in which they have chosen...
Saving the Youngest Workers: The Struggle against the Southeast Asian Sex Trade
Ten years have passed since the exposure of Thailand's rampant sex industry. The international community has progressed since the early 1990s, when the topic was of such high profile that research visas were not being released to persons studying child...
Stockpile Market: The Legacy of Soviet Weaponry
In today's increasingly globalized and economically liberal market, one would hardly expect a country, rich in a resource for which buyers are paying some 200 percent of the face value of the item, to draft export control legislation on such a resource....
The Buck Stops Here
Gary Hufbauer and Yee Wong ("Grading Growth: The Trade Legacy of President Bush," Summer 2004) ably assessed US President George W. Bush's trade efforts. I question two points: their criticism of US Treasury Secretary John Snow's comments supporting...
The Devil's Excrement: The Negative Effect of Natural Resources on Development
The discovery of new non-renewable natural resources, such as oil, natural gas, and minerals, has often been viewed as a sure-fire foundation for national development--those countries lucky enough to strike black gold, or gold itself, see themselves...
The Future of NATO: A New Organization for New Threats?
NATO's future is intimately connected to both its past and present. It has, after all, survived half a century of extraordinary change in very good order. It spectacularly proved its enduring relevance on September 12, 2001, when Article 5, the collective...
Together but Separate: Russia and Europe in the New Century
Under the leadership of President Vladimir Putin, Russia continues to search for its new role in the world. Forming relationships with Western neighbors is a crucial part of this search, since both Europe and Russia are undergoing tremendous internal...
Tropical Malady: Zimbabwe's Precipitous Decline
Much attention has been paid to the development of democracy in the Middle East and the struggle to keep it afloat in places like Russia. The struggle is usually portrayed as a battle waged by an initially dysfunctional democracy on an authoritarian...
World Orders: Unilateralism vs. Multilateralism
We have heard much in recent years, during the administration of US President George W. Bush, about the tension between unilateral and multilateral foreign policy. Many claim that the United States, many claim, is unilateralist, while Europe is multilateralist....
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.