Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer

Addressing Global Health: WHO Confronts AIDS, Drugs, and the Future of Health
The World Health Organization's (WHO) 3-by-5 initiative aims to treat 3 million people living with AIDS by the end of 2005. How does the initiative represent a change from past WHO efforts? [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The AIDS pandemic is one of the...
A Kiwi Plan: Tourism in New Zealand
In the melee of global politics, cultural tourism has seldom received attention. Yet tourism has developed into a significant industry for economies around the globe. Within tourism, ecological and cultural tourism sectors have grown dramatically....
A Long, Hot Summer: Repercussions of the French Heat Wave
Heat waves are a horrific phenomenon, killing thousands around the world annually, more than any other meteorological catastrophe. In the United States, heat waves are responsible for more than 400 deaths each year, greater than any other domestic,...
A New Currency: Climate Change and Carbon Credits
A new currency is emerging in world markets. Unlike the dollars, euros and yen that trade for tangible goods and human services, this new money exchanges for pollution--particularly emissions of carbon dioxide, which are caused by burning fossil fuels...
A Path to Reconstruction: Proverbs of Nation-Building
The latest attempt to impose Pax Americana in the Middle East and Central Asia may not last for more than a few years, but history advises us to expect recurrent visions of the US Manifest Destiny. International efforts to reconstruct failed or destroyed...
Calibrated Openness
Ann Florini's article ("Behind Closed Doors," Spring 2004) is certainly right that transparency is a vital aspect of democracy. But we must also recognize the unintended irony of Florini's recourse to the wisdom of James Madison. The same man who observed...
Changing the Rules: Constitutional Moments of the WTO
Does the World Trade Organization (WTO) have a constitutional future? It is not too soon to reexamine the institutional structure for global trade relations. The WTO is a young organization, barely more than a decade old, and it is a work in progress....
Conciliation: A New, Clear Iran Policy?
Based on initial steps taken to address a possible Iranian attempt to acquire nuclear capability, the major European powers have an opportunity to show greater unity, without generating tensions with the United States, than they did on the issue of...
Czech Minus: Grading the Republic's Economy
The Czech Republic seems to have worked its way out of the Soviet-imposed misery that lasted through the 1980s; the state appears to have shed its dreary image of concrete housing blocks and Communist inefficiency. The Czech Republic joined NATO in...
Developing Democracy: Democratizers' Surprisingly Bright Development Record
The past 25 years have seen an astonishing advance in the number of democracies around the world. Some 87 previously nondemocratic countries have made discernible advances towards democracy during this time. Of these democratizers, 70 have per capita...
Does One Size Fit All? the International Patent Regime
Over the years, Royal Philips Electronics has been responsible for an impressive series of breakthrough inventions, such as compact audio cassettes and compact discs. What is less well-known is that the company was set up in 1891 to exploit somebody...
Down the Road: Serbia's Path to Reconstruction
He came, he saw, and he conquered. When late Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic was elected to office in 2000, he inherited a struggling country and an economy rife with corruption and crime. After his predecessor, former President Slobodan Milosevic,...
Fasting for Food: Ethiopia's Years of Famine
For the past two years, the drought in Eastern Africa has caused famine, and no nation has been hit harder than Ethiopia. An early warning system that alerted the Ethiopian government to the potential crisis, along with a promising response to appeals...
Fox and EZLN: The Zapatista Rebellion in Mexico
Since Vincente Fox was elected president of Mexico in July 2000, the Zapatista rebellion in the Mexican state of Chiapas has received little attention from the international media. The tension between the government and the rebels, however, continues...
Grading Growth: The Trade Legacy of President Bush
The defining legacy of the administration of US President George W. Bush will be the Iraq war and its consequences. After that, historians will measure his aggressive tax cuts and his massive Homeland Security Department. Upon evaluation, President...
Growing Gains: Georgetown Steel and Subsidy Exemptions
The past few years have seen an explosion in privately and publicly expressed concern over the surging US imports from, and trade deficit with, China. The resulting political pressure, fueled by the US manufacturing sector's well-documented troubles,...
Laws of Labor: Core Labor Standards and Global Trade
Domestic policies to implement workers' rights have trade-offs with international trade's impact on labor markets. It is important to consider that labor markets and their regulation are undergoing sweeping reforms due to the progress of international...
Not Just Small Change
Without a definite beginning and with no foreseeable end, international trade is undoubtedly one of the most intriguing phenomena of the 21st century. Perhaps the origins of international trade lie in the Industrial Revolution that began in Great Britain,...
Plundering Peace: Congolese Natural Resources
After campaigns of ethnic cleansing, militias of child soldiers, and at least 3 million deaths in the past six years, relief has finally arrived in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The UN-backed transitional government, formed in July 2003,...
Secrecy Oaths: A License to Lie?
Between 1968 and 1971, I repeatedly broke a solemn, formal promise that I had made in good faith: not to reveal to any "unauthorized persons" information that I received through certain channels and under certain safeguards, collectively known as the...
Stonewalling Justice: US Opposition to the ICC
In the summer of 1998, representatives from 160 countries and a host of non-governmental organizations converged in Rome to draft a mandate for the establishment of the world's first global court for the prosecution of war crimes, genocide, and crimes...
The Final Frontier: New Space for US-China Relations
On October 15, 2003, at 9:00 AM Beijing time, the People's Republic of China became the third nation in history to send a human into orbit. The "taikonaut," Lt. Col. Yang Liwei, landed the inaugural flight just over 21 hours later and immediately became...
The Seven Ingredients: When Democracy Promotion Works
The fall of Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze, like the ousting of Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic, will go down as the stuff of democracy promotion legend. As in any successful campaign, veterans were revered and the defeated grew bitter....
The Story of Surplus: The Forces Behind Trade
While trade shouldn't be viewed as competitive because an increase in productivity means increased product for an entire market, will differences in growth rates lead to political competition that threatens free trade? [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] ...
The Three Players
I would like to complement James Hsiung's article ("The Strategic Triangle," Spring 2004) by exploring the "not-so-strategic" triangle and thinking about the future of the relations between the three key players. In juxtaposing my themes with those...
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