Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 3, Fall

An Empire in Denial: The Limits of US Imperialism
It used to be only foreigners and those on the fringes of US politics who referred to the "American Empire." Invariably, they did so in order to criticize the United States. Since the attack on the World Trade Center in September 2001, however, there...
A Question of Pride: Leveraging Human Nature to Build a Better United Nations
What problem facing the United Nations is as challenging as Cyprus, as intricate as the Middle East, and as erratic and unpredictable as El Nino? According to UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the answer is human resources management, a make-or-break...
A River in Peril: The Waters Rise at Three Gorges
Along the banks of China's longest river, the Yangtze, the water is rising. As the river floods, over a million villagers settled in the surrounding valley are being forced to relocate their homes hundreds, and sometimes thousands, of miles away. Yet...
Breach of Trust: Leadership in a Market Economy
If leadership is about setting an example that others seek to emulate, who could argue with the proven track record of sustained economic success in the United States? During the boom years of the 1990s, it was hard find fault with the country's economic...
Changing the Mix: Renewable Energy and the Continuing Need for Fossil Fuels
OPEC cares passionately about world energy as a whole and not just about petroleum. I Cleaner, safer, and easier energy. Energy. for development. Energy that can enrich the lives of even the world's poorest communities. A key mandate of our Secretariat...
Democratic or Legalistic Legitimacy?
Professor Wei Pan ("Crossing the River," Summer 2003) suggests China's next decade of reform will succeed or fail according to three choices: whether "reformists" or "conservatives" run the government, whether external powers (especially the United...
Divine Injustice: Papal Influence Italian Politics
For a country that contains the seat of Roman Catholicism, Italy is decidedly un-Catholic in its politics. Despite the declaration of abortion as immoral by Pope Paul VI in 1968, abortion has been legal in Italy for 25 years; despite the Church's 2,000-year-old...
Dueling Outlets: Proliferation of the Media in Iraq
In the midst of continued guerilla warfare against coalition forces, escalating terrorist activity throughout the country, and shortages of even basic resources like electricity and water, there is at least one sign that US President George Bush's...
Episode II: US Ballistic Missile Defense
The 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty restricted US and Soviet development of missile defense systems. Based on the logic of mutually assured destruction and in an effort to curb the Cold War arms race, each country was allowed to deploy limited...
From the Trenches: Multilateralism in US Military Interventions
WESLEY CLARK is former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe and former Commander-in-Chief, US European Command. During your experience as commander-in-chief of the Allied Forces in the NATO operations in Kosovo, were there any structural hindrances...
General Strategies: How the United States Makes War
Recently you have written about the United States as a "reluctant warrior" in international affairs. Could you elaborate on your views about the unique nature of the US role in global affairs in the post-Cold War and post-September 11 era? You used...
HIR: 25 Years of Leadership
The Harvard International Review has contributed to the world's debates on international affairs for a quarter of a century. Founded to promote academic exchange while informing the casual reader, the HIR's mission has only grown more urgent with the...
Identity in Crisis: Egyptian Political Identity in the Face of Globalization
National political identities reflect material interest and the exercise of power, hence they mirror the outcome of the clash of those interests and the capacity as well as the inclusiveness of governmental institutions. A coherent national political...
In China, Let the Donor Beware
China's HIV/AIDS epidemic is not yet the world's worst ("An Epidemic of Denial," Summer 2003). However, its most recent wave is definitely one of the most bizarre. Not since the Romanian episode in which newborns received HIV as a result of contaminated...
In Their Own Words: Leaders Speak Out
Introducing our symposium on leadership is a special collection of interviews with world leaders from a variety of fields, including economics, business, government, and international law. Though their expertise and perspectives are diverse, their...
Learning Curve: Da Silva on the National Scene
The 2002 elections were good to the left-wing Worker's Party (PT) in Brazil. The 57-year-old former metal worker, Luis Inacio da Silva, or Lula as he is more commonly called, was swept into office after almost a decade of unsuccessful attempts to rise...
Moral Leadership: Beyond Management and Governance
Perhaps at no other time in recent history has the question of leadership been so acutely relevant and so dramatically posed. The diplomatic struggle at the United Nations over the fate of Iraq, the decision by the United States and Britain to launch...
Most Dangerous Path: Establishing the Rule of Law in Serbia
Ever since the perfidious assassination of Serbian Premier Zoran Djindjic, my fellow fighter in the battle for democratic change, I have pondered what went wrong. What could have been done, what should have been done, to thwart that awful tragedy?...
New Kids on the Bloc: Revisiting Kennan's Containment in a Pre-Emptive World. (Perspectives
The publication of the US National Security Strategy in September 2002 and the consequent embrace by US President George Bush's administration of its most divisive aspect, pre-emption, has instigated a fundamental shift in tactical thinking, force...
On the Offensive: Assassination Policy under International Law
Originally promulgated in the time of kings when wars of aggression were the sovereign's prerogative, international custom and later treaties prohibiting attacks on the leader arose from kings' mutual desire to protect themselves. In the post-League...
Playstation2 Detonation: Controlling the Threat of Dual-Use Technologies
The biblical prophesy promising peace to those who turn their swords to ploughshares seems remarkably optimistic in today's world of dual-use technologies (DUTs), commercial products designed for peaceful employment but potentially adaptable to military...
Rebel Republic: Russia's Chechen Conundrum
On face, the referendum held in Chechnya on March 24, 2003, seems like a hopeful sign. By a broad margin--Russian election officials reported roughly 95 percent of voters in favor--Chechens approved a Kremlin-backed draft constitution that would make...
Royal Crackdown: Saudi Arabia's September 11
On the night of May 12, 2003, four explosions targeted at Westerners rocked the Saudi capital of Riyadh. In the months following these attacks, the ruling Al Saud family has demonstrated new levels of vigilance and self-scrutiny and some recognition...
Shifting Gears: Courting Capital in South Africa
The 1994 victory of Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress (ANC) marked an end to the legalized racism of apartheid, ushering in what was to be a golden era of democracy and economic prosperity. Yet rampant unemployment, growing crime, and...
The Cyprus Crucible: The Importance of Good Timing
Turkish President Kemal Ataturk, a consummate leader, appreciated the importance of an acute sense of timing in pursuit of larger national objectives. Encouraged by chauvinists among his Turkish compatriots before he signed the Treaty of Lausanne in...
Viable Candidates: Michael Corgan Reviews the Future of NATO Expansion
The split between the United States and "Old" Europe over Iraq has had reverberations far beyond the chambers of the UN Security Council. The clash had a divisive impact on relations between NATO and the European Union, as well as within the organizations...
Who Is at the Helm? Leadership
Since the end of the Cold War, policy makers and scholars alike have struggled to characterize an international system in transition. Their challenge is to describe the nature of the driving forces that have changed world affairs--on both state and...
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