Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 3, Summer

Breaking the Wall: China and the Three Gorges Dam
ALEXANDER KUO, World in Review Editor, Harvard International Review November 7, 1997, marked the beginning of the end for a scenic stretch along the Yangtze River in Yichang, China. Groups of giant Caterpillar trucks disposed large boulders into...
Closer Look at South Africa's Transition
The Winter 1997/98 edition of the Harvard International Review included an article by former South African President F.W. de Klerk, who presented many thought-provoking perspectives on South Africa. Many of the views of the former National Party (NP)...
Collision Course: The United States, Iran, and the End of Containment
The transition of Iran's political organization and the resulting reversal of its foreign policy have drastically affected the nation's relations with members of the international community. The United States, which had friendly diplomatic relations...
Drawing on Custom: Future Prospects for International Humanitarian Law
MICHAEL HOFFMAN is Officer for International Humanitarian Law for the American Red Cross. The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the author and not necessarily those of the American Red Cross. International humanitarian law...
Enter Argentina: Democratization, Trade, and Economic Expansion
CARLOS MENEM is President of Argentina. In this era of industrialization, Argentina is making an effort to insert its economy into the international system, an endeavor which can only be compared to the previous effort made by our country over a...
For Whom the Road Tolls: Road Pricing in Singapore
Another weekday dawns in cities around the globe, and the only thing as predictable as the rising of the sun is something insidious--gridlock. Since traffic first appeared as an endemic problem in the modern city, there have been few solutions, other...
Hail Britannia: The Benefits of Empire in the Modern Age
In 1999, Australians will enter the voting booth to decide the fate of the monarchy in their country. The choice, ostensibly, is between a native president and continued allegiance to Queen Elizabeth II. Many around the world, however, see this vote...
Joining East and West: A Confucian Perspective on Human Rights
TU WEIMING is Professor of Chinese History and Philosophy at Harvard University. This article is based on an expanded version of Professor Tu's "Epilogue" in Confucianism and Human Rights, edited by William T. de Bary and Tu Weiming (Columbia University...
Legal Reform: Reviewing Human Rights in the Muslim World
AZIZAH AL-HIBRI is Professor of Law at the University of Richmond. She is also President and founder of Karamah: Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights. Muslim countries are the bete noire of the Human Rights Movement. Problems in these countries...
Lender of Last Resort: Rethinking IMF Conditionality
GOPAL GARUDA, Staff Writer, Harvard International Review On December 1, 1997, the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) Managing Director, Michael Camdessus, announced a historic multibillion dollar bailout of the Republic of Korea. Designed to stabilize...
New Medical Ethic: Physicians and the Fight for Human Rights
LEONARD S. RUBENSTEIN is Executive Director of Physicians for Human Rights. Professionals have played a uniquely important role in the movement for human rights. Lawyers, steeped in the rule of law, actively promote codes and covenants articulating...
New Role: European Integration and Finnish Foreign Policy
MARTTI AHTISAARI is President of the Republic of Finland. As the new millennium approaches, Finland is a decision-maker in its own affairs to a greater degree than ever before in its history, a remarkable achievement for a small country and its...
Panama's Canal: The US Departure and Panama's New Era
On December 31, 1999, while the rest of the world will be celebrating the arrival of the new millennium, Panama's attention will be focused on noon and the return of the Panama Canal to its control. But as American troops gradually evacuate the...
Planet Savers: International Coalitions for the Environment
In the past ten to 15 years, pollution and the possibility of resultant climate change have been recognized as a global dilemma. International environmental directives, however, cannot be effective in reaching their goals if they are created by only...
Popular Diplomacy: The American Public and US Foreign Policy
JAMES P. RUBIN is US Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs. People say that all politics is local. Well, much of US foreign policy is domestic. As America's top diplomat, Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright has already logged enough...
Trading Together (the Founding of Mercosur Has Resulted in the Attraction of Foreign Investment in Latin America)
Argentina's regional plans are currently focused heavily on the successful development of Mercosur, the treaty for a "Common Market of the South." The agreement, signed in 1991 by Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay, was originally intended to...
Turbulent Relations: Redirecting US Foreign Policy towards North Korea
CHRISTOPHER LIM PARK, Staff Writer, Harvard International Review Kim Jong-Il's election as General Secretary of the Korean Worker's Party on October 8, 1997, was marked by festive pageantry which included swimmers performing "Cheers All Over the...
Universalism and Dissent: Human Rights in a Changing World
Fifty years ago this winter, the United Nations General Assembly adopted, without dissent, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This landmark manifesto aimed to promote respect for basic human rights and freedoms, and to "secure their universal...
Universal Truths: Human Rights and the Westernizing Illusion
AMARTYA SEN is Master of Trinity College at Cambridge University and former Lamont University Professor at Harvard. This article is a revised version of the Commencement Address given at Bard College on May 24, 1997. Related arguments were presented...