Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 2, Summer

Blasphemous Pluralism: Examining Indonesia's Blasphemy Law
Since the country's democratization in 1998, Indonesia has generally witnessed a great improvement in human rights conditions. There exists a great diversity of religious communities in the country and the vast majority of these groups operate with...
Can Indigenous Justice Survive? Legal Pluralism and the Rule of Law
While working for the federal courts of the United States in 1993, I was asked to staff a Task Force on Tribal Courts charged with addressing jurisdictional gaps and tensions between the federal courts and the tribal courts in Indian Country in the...
Caudillos and Constitutions: Who Holds the Ultimate Authority?
Who or what holds the ultimate authority: a decade-old constitution or a leader with resounding popular support? Colombia's Constitutional Court answered this question in February 2010 by upholding the integrity of the foundation of any modern democracy--its...
Complex Adaptive Systems: A New Blueprint to Analyze Imperial Collapse
Ferguson's essay "Complexity and Collapse: Empires on the Edge of Chaos" in Foreign Affairs (March/April 2010)asserts that empires can suddenly and unexpectedly collapse if a small trigger throws off the balance of the system; imperial collapse does...
Countryside First: Security Prescription for Colombia
Once the Colombian Constitutional Court denied Alvaro Uribe a third presidential term in February, several candidates stepped forward, with former defense minister Juan Manuel Santos and Green Party candidate Antanas Mockus leading the pack. All candidates...
Economic Nationalism Dies Hard: How Political Forces Are Resurrecting "Industrial Policy"
The term industrial policy has gone through many phases. First identified with trade protection in Latin America and later seen as the instrument propelling East Asian economies to success, it has either been reviled or espoused depending on time,...
Ending Dictatorship: Pakistan's Eighteenth Amendment
Unanimity rarely occurs in legislatures worldwide--even rarer, then, would it be to have two simultaneous unanimous votes. The 18th amendment to Pakistan's constitution thus carries the unusual distinction of being approved by all 292 members of the...
Exporting Legal Education: Lessons Learned from Efforts in Transition Countries
A convergence of inward and outward-looking processes in US law schools creates both risk and potential reward in the development of legal education. How each law faculty succeeds or fails in coordinating those processes will affect not just US law...
Freedom of the Dress: Religion and Women's Rights in Secular States
This essay focuses on the vexed institutional relationship between secular and religious sources of law and authority in liberal democracies that adhere to the separation between state and religion, and asks whether it might be possible to balance...
Gender Equality and Life Choices
Margot Wallstrom ("A Womanly Virtue," Spring 2010) helpfully calls our attention to the horrific lives of women in much of the underdeveloped world. But her understanding of gender equality in the developed world is problematic. Wallstrom says that...
Green Construction: An Answer to the Twin Financial and Climate Crises
The world currently faces two of its biggest challenges: the stabilization of the global economy and the prevention of climate change. The evident failure of the Copenhagen Climate Conference in December 2009 suggests a lack of worldwide cooperation...
Holy Glocalization: Constitutions and Sacred Texts in the 'Non-Secular' World
An increasingly common approach to governing religion and state relations in non-secular settings is a mixed system of religious law and general legal principles. Despite their many past and present variations, such hybrid legal regimes defy the Franco-American...
How to Keep Promises: A Way Forward for Optimizing HIV/AIDS Care
Governments often cite compassion for and solidarity with those in need as the driving forces behind their generosity in response to global health challenges. The series of global commitments to universal access to health care enshrined in the Millennium...
Letter from the Editors
Over the two centuries of its existence, the United States Constitution has become firmly entrenched as a model of governance and has been exported far and wide across emerging democracies. The Symposium we humbly offer you for the summer, "Law of...
Merkel in Trouble: Greek Debt, the EU, and Politics
From when it first became apparent to the international community that Greece would have trouble honoring its considerable national debt, after running a 13.6% budget deficit last year, talk emerged of the plausibility of a bailout. Bond yields had...
The Dog That Didn't Bark: Latin America's Recent Economic Performance in Perspective
As a general rule, events that did not happen are not considered newsworthy or particularly relevant. Yet, the clue that helped Sherlock Holmes solve one of his cases was precisely a non-event: the fact that the dog had not barked. Likewise, the economic...
The GOP's Sex Problem
As Kira Sanbonmatsu notes in her piece, "Life's a Party," (Harvard International Review, Spring 2010), women are severely underrepresented in US politics. In the US Congress, 84 percent of the members of the House of Representatives and 83 percent...
Trying Times for Rwanda: Reevaluating Gacaca Courts in Post-Genocide Reconciliation
The 1994 Rwandan genocide has become the most heavily adjudicated conflict in recent world history. After the assassination of Rwanda's president on April 6, 1994, a reactionary group of elites seeking to reassert their control over Rwandan society...
Wading in Autocracy: Senegal's Near-Despotism
As the Republic of Senegal prepares to celebrate its 50 years of independence from France, the government is set to spend approximately US$624,000 on the lavish inauguration party of President Abdoulaye Wade's pet project, the Statue of African Renaissance....
While America Fought: The Implications of a New US Foreign Policy Focus
When President Woodrow Wilson set foot on French soil after his trip across the Atlantic to the Paris Peace Conference, he carried with him a new age of US foreign policy. No longer could the United States count on the natural barrier of its two oceans...