Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 1, Spring

2008 Olympics: Dragon in the Limelight
When Beijing won the bid for the 2008 Olympics in 2001, thousands of Chinese citizens flooded Tiananmen Square in celebration of the momentous event. Unlike most people around the world, the Chinese seem unfazed by the scandals that have recently wreaked...
A Game of Giants: The Future of Sino-US Relations
The end of the Cold War brought a profound restructuring in the international system of power; no longer driven by the constraints of a bipolar world, alliances between states became fluid and pragmatic. This trend was reinforced after September 11,...
A Global Prognosis
With the tsunami that killed several hundred thousand Southeast Asians came the world's sudden and intense interest in international health--for a time. The cast of characters that compose the international community, from nongovernmental organizations...
Beyond Yes and No: Provincial Autonomy and the Future of Quebec
The nation of Quebec has been an established nation of the Americas for more than 470 years. It is the principal home for francophones on the continent. Before, and particularly since the birth of the Canadian confederation in 1867, Quebec has affirmed...
Controlling Tobacco: The Vital Role of Local Communities
Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death in the world. It kills more than five million people each year. If current trends continue, tobacco is projected to kill ten million per year by 2020, with 70 percent of those deaths occurring in developing...
Costly Sporting: Greece's Post-Olympic Woes
To the surprise of much of the world, Greece overcame construction delays, a July blackout in Athens, weak ticket sales, and infamous sweltering summer temperatures to put on a fun and secure show at the 2004 Summer Olympics. But, as predicted by much...
Detecting Danger
In a prescient Foreign Affairs article published in 1961, Fred Charles Ikle succinctly asked, "After Detection--What?" In doing so, Ikle, who would soon be appointed to the directorship of the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, highlighted what...
Dynamic Dubai: An Oasis of Growth
For some, the Middle East offers little of economic and political importance. They view the region with suspicion, seeing it as a breeding ground for terrorists due to radical fundamentalist Islam and the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict. But such...
Enabling Genetics: Promise in the Developing World
The recent sequencing of the human and other genomes has created the potential to explore and exploit genetic information in ways previously unimaginable--an advancement that will have an impact on virtually every aspect of medicine. Yet few regions...
Engineering Social Trust: What Can Communities and Institutions Do?
A precise definition of social trust is difficult to pin down, but it has been encapsulated as an ongoing motivation or impetus for social relations that forms a basis for interaction. Social trust can entail perceived honesty, objectivity, consistency,...
Killer Corrections: AIDS in South African Prisons
South Africa has acknowledged that it has a serious HIV/AIDS problem. The country has the largest number of HIV-positive people in the world, and the number will likely keep rising. After huge pressure from civil society, the government is beginning...
Legal and Political Acrobats: The Fate and Future of the International Court of Justice
Why is the same country that spearheads the "Coalition of the Willing" in Baghdad rallying a "Coalition of the Unwilling" in The Hague? Why would it bend the law to bring one villain down, and block the law that stops others from rising? Why should...
Maintaining NATO
NATO was fortunate to have two particularly gifted Secretaries General at moments of historic change for the international community. At the end of the Cold War the German Manfred Woerner creatively succeeded in adapting the Alliance to the disappearance...
Missed Opportunities: Governance of Global Infectious Diseases
Addressing the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS in June 2001, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan declared, "For there to be any hope of success in the fight against HIV/AIDS, the world must join together in a great global alliance." Earlier,...
No End in Sight: Female Mutilation Unabated
Progress on the elimination of female genital mutilation (FGM) in Africa has come to a halt as the Protocol on the Rights of Women in Africa remains 12 votes from ratification in the African Union (AU). Also called the Maputo Protocol, the Protocol...
Public Enemy or Public Good? Frederick Pinto Reviews Free Culture
After developing a theoretical framework for analyzing the regulation of digital media in his first book and charting how he foresaw an over-regulation of ideas in his second, Stanford law professor Lawrence Lessig sets out to show how copyright law...
Public Health in War: Pursuing the Impossible
Some 98,000 Iraqi civilians have died since the US-led invasion began in March 2003, epidemiologist Les Roberts and his colleagues estimated by conducting a population-based survey. The report, in a recent issue of the Lancet, seemed to take the world...
Putin Power: Russia's Ruler Entrenches
Following the deaths of hundreds of Russians during a school siege in the city of Beslan, Russian President Vladimir Putin unveiled on September 20, 2002, two major political reforms ostensibly designed to help Moscow combat terrorism. The proposals...
Research Imbalances: Taking Science to the Problem
The Commission on Health Research for Development based at Harvard University demonstrated in a landmark 1990 study that less than 10 percent of the world's resources for health research were being devoted to 90 percent of the world's health problems....
Running after a Fallen Fox: The Prelude to Mexico's 2006 Presidential Election
While the US government fights an inconclusive war 6,200 miles away in Iraq, social controls continue to erode in Mexico, which shares a 2,000-mile-long border with the United States and whose uncertain fate is intertwined with the United States' own....
Sanctioned State: The US Embargo on Cuba
Cuba may be just 90 miles off the coast of Florida, but it is a world away politically from the United States. The United States has imposed its infamous embargo on the nearby Communist island-state since 1961, and all signs indicate that the administration...
The Advance of Freedom: US Foreign Policy and Democratic Revolution
Forty-odd years ago I was providentially required to read R.R. Palmer's classic work, The Age of the Democratic Revolution. Palmer argued that the Western world in the last quarter of the 18th century was characterized by a revolutionary democratic...
The Cost of Care: Is There an Optimal Level of Expenditure?
Many countries' concern over their level of health care expenditure raises the question of what the optimal level of national expenditure devoted to health care ought to be. It is, unfortunately, extremely difficult to define such a universal level...
Ultimate Therapy: Commercial Eugenics in the 21st Century
While the 20th century was shaped largely by spectacular breakthroughs in the fields of physics and chemistry, the 21st century will belong to the biological sciences. Scientists around the world are quickly deciphering the genetic code of life, unlocking...

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