Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 2, Summer

A Crisis of Image: Achieving Africa's Potential
There has recently been a revival of interest in Africa's economic potential on the part of international players. Indeed there have been many insinuations that the prevailing post-Cold War assessment of the continent as a place fit for little more...
Africa in Transition: Facing the Challenges of Globalization
On March 6, 1957 Ghana became the first sub-Saharan country to achieve independence from European colonial rule. Over the next 23 years, most of the other sub-Saharan colonies followed suit. Expectations on the continent and around the world were high,...
Africa Redefined: A Call for Internal Initiative
Located only blocks away from St. James's palace in London's West End, the neoclassical mansion of Lancaster House was perhaps an unlikely venue for the final act of a century-long era of colonial rule and occupation. However, beginning on December...
A New Conflict
Professor Maier's article ("Dark Power: Globalization, Inequality, and Conflict," Spring 2007) argues that other forces in the international system--what Maier labels "dark power"--will increasingly restrict the power of the state, leaving it relevant...
A New Realism: Crafting a US Foreign Policy for a New Century
US foreign policymakers face novel challenges in the 21st century. Jihadists and environmental crises have replaced armies and missiles as the greatest threats, and globalization has eroded the significance of national borders. Many problems that were...
An Opportunistic Ally: China's Increasing Involvement in Africa
Chinese officials, think tank researchers, and representatives of state-owned companies frequently refer to a "win-win" outcome when discussing Chinese-African relations. Most of my interlocutors during visits to Beijing and Shanghai this year sincerely...
A Renewed Interest: US-Africa Engagement
In a post-9/11 world, the United States has come to recognize that it has strategic interests in parts of the world that it long viewed as marginal at best. Africa is one such area. As a result, there has been an unprecedented focus on African issues...
Averting Catastrophe: Combating Iran's Nuclear Threat
As the world awaits Iran's development of nuclear weapons, no legal doctrine allows any nation to use force against Iran, despite its support for terrorism and the professed goal of destroying Israel. The question for the international community is...
Building Peace: The United Nations' Role in the Post-Conflict State
GEORGE E. MOOSE is adjunct professor in International Practice at the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. He has served as US Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs and US Permanent Representative to the...
Changing the System: The Necessity of Russian Pension Reforms
Over the past decade Russia's economy has been buoyed by renewal and newfound prosperity. Since the financial meltdown of 1998, the country has achieved positive economic progress. Driven by higher oil prices, Russian exports totaled US$317 billion,...
Child Slavery: India's Self-Perpetuating Dilemma
In the early hours of the morning, long before dawn has risen, eleven-year-old Yeramma quietly wakes amidst the heavy machinery of the silk factory. For the next twelve hours, she will toil in silence with two or three other children in the Indian...
Coca Conflict: Brazil's Impending War on Drugs
With the reelection of President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in September 2006, inequities appeared to be fading and the quality of life of the average Brazilian seemed to be improving. Lula promised to advance the economy, already the ninth largest...
Dark Ages of Human Rights? Linda A. Malone Reviews Inventing Human Rights
The leader of the most powerful nation in the world embarks on military campaigns purportedly to spread the revolution of democracy, but which instead lead to worldwide accusations of imperialistic aggression. Strongly supportive of religious freedom...
Fading Mirage: Illusory Reform in Saudi Arabia
In the eyes of many Westerners, the idea of reform in Saudi Arabia is a contradiction. The Al Saud dynasty has long held a monopoly of political, religious, and social power over its citizens. The government currently bans all opposition political...
Invisible Children: Romania's Orphan Tragedy
Prior to its entry into the European Union in January 2007, Romania selectively reformed its political and economic institutions and policies in order to meet EU standards and regulations. While agricultural and foreign policies were altered with much...
Learning from Within: The End of Somalia's Regional Conflicts
The horn of Africa has been a historically prosperous locale. When Muslim traders penetrated the tribal region that is now Somalia around 1000 C.E., bringing religion, wealth, and infrastructure, they brought what seemed to be the final pieces for...
Moderate Revivalists: Islamic Inroads in Sub-Saharan Africa
There are approximately three hundred million African Muslims in the world, which comprises roughly one-third of the African continent's population. But despite this fairly large Muslim population and Islam's historical presence in Africa, African...
On the Air: Rwanda's Media Challenges
Rwanda's stringent media policies stand in stark contrast to the recent improvements in Africa's freedom of press. The issue of a free press in Rwanda is particularly complicated by its role in the 1994 genocide, in which close to one million Rwandans...
Pacific Power: A New Japan-Australia Alliance
Upon announcing his country's security pact with Japan in March 2007, Australian Prime Minster John Howard proclaimed, "Japan and Australia have a common destiny in this part of the world." This new agreement between two major democracies, which calls...
Question of Balance
Professor Wohlforth's article, ("Unipolar Stabilty: The Rules of Power Analysis," Spring 2007), is a thoughtful attempt to counter the suggestion that the "unipolar moment" identified by Charles Krauthammer has come to an end. This is an important...
Reinventing Integration: Muslims in the West
As the sixth year of the US-led war on terror rages on, it would appear that few constructs are more self-evident than the one dividing Islam and the West. Muslim minorities in the West are often scrutinized through this paradoxical prism. On which...
Rogue State: Maine's Foray into US Foreign Policy
US foreign policy has traditionally been the purview of the federal government, but recent actions by states have stealthily challenged this assumption. Over the last decade, US governors have increasingly conducted their own foreign trade policy....
The Next Plague: HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe
Stopping the spread of HIV/AIDS requires not only scientific awareness but also public awareness. More so than any other disease, HIV spreads because of misconception and lack of information; for instance, it is often dismissed as a threat to only...
Toward a Golden Age: Reflections on Global Health and Social Justice
We are living in a time of unprecedented opportunity in global health. The past decade has seen bold health-related commitments from political leaders, such as the Millennium Development Goals and the 2005 pledge by heads of state and government to...