Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 1, Spring

An Eye for an Eye: Counterterrorism, Reciprocity, and Human Rights
Mark Osiel's provocative new book, The End of Reciprocity: Terror, Torture and the Law of War, provides detailed discussions of a number of important moral and legal issues arising for the United States in its ongoing response to the threats posed...
A Renewed Approach: Finding Stability in US-Pakistan Relations
You have extensive experience in Pakistani diplomacy and have served Pakistan as Ambassador for two terms. What do you think were the main diplomatic issues facing Pakistan during your ambassadorship and how, if at all, do you think the issues have...
A Tightrope Act: Jordan's Turmoil after Gaza
In December 2008, as televisions worldwide lit up with footage from the Israeli assault on Gaza, protestors next door in Amman, Jordan shouted their support for Hamas, their opposition to Fatah, and their frustration with conciliatory Arab regimes....
Counterinsurgency: Lessons from Iraq and Afghanistan
Before the US interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the subsequent outbreak of insurgencies in those countries, counterinsurgency was a badly neglected part of the US defense establishment's security repertoire. During the 1990s, civilian leaders,...
Demystifying Defense: Exposing Myths about US Military Expenditures
The most serious impediments to a serious discussion of defense spending are the myths that surround it. Until these myths are cleared away, no rational debate regarding what the United States and its allies around the world should do to secure their...
Duke University Presents ... an Outflow of Talent: Nativism and the US Reverse Brain Drain
As the world hurtles headlong into the deepest global recession since the Great Depression, the controversial cultural and economic tensions that have always existed around the sensitive topics of immigration and immigration policy are again coming...
Failing the State: Recognizing Somaliland
As nations across Africa struggle to maintain law and order, the international community has forsaken one of Africa's most promising states. Somaliland announced its independence from Somalia in 1991, seizing its opportunity during a power vacuum in...
Faith and Fragile States: Why the Development Community Needs Religion
Once upon a time most social scientists assumed that the global march of political and economic modernization would relegate religion to a purely spiritual domain. Few, therefore, contemplated religion's ability to influence the ways in which societies...
Freedom House Presents ... Civil Society under Threat Bureaucratic Strategies of the New Authoritarians
After several decades of consistent progress, the state of global freedom has entered a period of stagnation and possibly even decline. The reasons for recent setbacks to liberty are numerous and complex. However, to a significant degree, the reversal...
Letter from the Editors
What does "modern war" entail? The end of the Cold War signalled a shift--at least temporarily--away from territorial conflicts between large states and towards smaller, messier forms of warfare. US counterinsurgency in Iraq and Afghanistan typifies...
NATO'S Future: Facing Old Divisions and New Threats
NATO has much to celebrate in the year of its 60th anniversary. In the twenty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989, NATO has incorporated much of Central and Eastern Europe into its membership. It responded to the threat that...
On Liberty: Detention in New Forms of Armed Conflict
On September 11, 2001, Al Qaeda operatives attacked civilian and military targets on US territory, causing thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in economic loss. On September 12, the United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution...
Politics, Please
Nicolas de Torrente and Fabrice Weissman ("A War Without Limits," Winter 2008) insightfully document international complicity in Somalia's recent suffering. The piece leaves the reader incensed at our collective failure but uncomfortably bereft of...
Pressing for Change: Journalistic Freedom in Russia
Following his decisive electoral victory in March 2008, Russian president Dmitry Medvedev vigorously affirmed his intent to protect freedom of the press in the Russian Federation, arguing that independent media provided a crucial channel of communication...
Reconsidering SDRs
The current global financial crisis has unsurprisingly intensified calls to reform the governance of the International Monetary Fund. Richard Cooper's article, "Necessary Reform: The IMF and International Financial Architecture" (Winter 2008), parallels...
Seeds of Discontent: Politics and Argentine Agriculture
Soybeans grown by the ton in Argentina's expansive farmland represent a substantial part of that nation's export market. Herds of cattle bred and fed in the vast pampas make the country famous for its high-quality beef. But for President Cristina Fernandez...
South Africa's ANC Split: End of an Era?
Is South Africa leaving the era of Nelson Mandela? After the country's 14 years of de facto single party rule under the African National Congress (ANC), the party of Mandela and of liberation has experienced serious internal divisions over leadership...
The EU Reflection Group: Learning from the Past
The rapidly changing, globalized world never ceases to both surprise and catch us unawares. The world economical crisis that started out as a financial crisis in the United States, however, has done more than that. As it continues worsening each day,...
The Other Great Depression: New Hope from a Long-Forgotten Crisis
There is a part of our brain which firmly believes that disaster begets disaster. This intuition probably comes from daily life--for example, we see gambling misadventures lead to a job loss, a painful divorce, and so on. It is also natural to apply...
The Vanishing Law of War Reflections on Law and War in the 21st Century
In 1952, Sir Hersch Lauterpacht, then the Whewell Professor of International Law at the University of Cambridge, opined in the British Yearbook of International Law that "if international law is the vanishing point of law, the law of war is at the...
Unity under Siege: The European Single Market after the Financial Crisis
As Europe's leaders respond to the financial crisis, concerns of economic protectionism are leading to greater questions over the fundamental unity of the European Union. At risk is the European Single Market, which, though less prominent than the...
US Nuclear Policy: The Open Window for Transformation
It is often said that the world is at a nuclear tipping point. By this, analysts mean that the policy choices we make over the next few years may determine if we tip over into nuclear catastrophe or pull back from the various brinks on which we now...
Winning the Fight: Eradicating Slavery in the Modern Age
The money in Ghana has always been down on the coast. Poor religious and tribal minorities live in the North, where Ibrahim was born. Orphaned at the age of nine, Ibrahim set off with his uncle in search of work. They followed rumors to the gold mines...
Womb for Rent: India's Commercial Surrogacy
As one of the world's leading outsourcing destinations, India capitalizes on its comparative advantages to play host to a variety of foreign service sectors. Bu t in addition to attracting commonplace jobs such as information technology (IT) services,...
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