Harvard International Review

This journal provides commentary, news and analysis of global developments in politics, economics, public policy, science and culture.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 3, Winter

A New Wild West: Opening the Northwest Passage
As climate change accelerates, the geography of the Arctic is rapidly changing. Of late, there has been much discussion about new potential that is being opened up in the North, and countries are stepping forward to capitalize on it. The window of...
A Personal Portrait of SMS: Innovation and Application for Progress
I am currently entering my 11th year in the once fledgling field of "mobiles for development." The story of "m4d," as it is fondly known, and the countless stories of how mobiles have impacted the lives of hundreds of millions of people throughout...
Cellular Citizenship: Invigorating Development through Mobile
In Nigeria, hundreds of government-hired enumerators armed with GPS-enabled smartphones have systematically been visiting schools, water points, and health facilities across the country. At each location they take a photo, record a GPS point, and with...
Development Tech
In early June 2012, a diverse group of scientists, engineers, and policymakers convened at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University for the inaugural "International Conference on Technology and Innovation for Global Development."...
Diplomatic Discussions: Jeffrey Bader's Obama and China's Rise
In the opening lines of Obama and China's Rise, former diplomat Jeffrey Bader invokes Volta ire's observation that history is--far from an objective account of the past--often "a pack of lies played on the dead." Using this epigram as an example of...
Empowering Communities: How Mobile Is Transforming Development
The role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), particularly broadband, in boosting economic growth and national competitiveness is now widely recognized. The ICT infrastructure is today both a vital national asset and an investment...
It's Economics, Stupid: Mobile Technology in Low-Income Countries
In a recent article in Time, former United States president Bill Clinton lists five global phenomena as causes for optimism, beginning with the assertion that "phones mean freedom." Clinton explains that mobile phones "foster equality" and have "revolutionized...
Jacob Zuma: Assessing His First Three Years
In December 2012, the African National Congress (ANC) will decide whether to re-appoint its president, Jacob Zuma. Since the Republic of South Africa's first democratic elections in 1994, the ANC President has, ex officio, been the president of the...
Japan under DPJ Rule: The Costs of Overemphasizing Political Leadership
The ascendance of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) on August 2009 was praised as the first genuine power transition in Japan's postwar history. However, there were just as many--or more--who were anxious about the new DPJ-led Japanese government's...
Letter from the Editors
Across the developing world, mobile technology is being used in novel ways. Its evolution reminds, us that innovation is not just the incremental improvement of technology, but the advancement of our ability to meet global needs. Few would turn to...
Market Solution to Poverty: The Decade of Latin America and the Caribbean
A generation ago, Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) was known for debt crises, military dictatorships, hyperinflation, and grinding poverty. Today, the region is characterized by regional political and economic integration, increased global market...
No Oil for Israel: Israel Mines for Natural Gas
Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir once said that the only thing the Jews have against Moses is that he "brought us to the one spot in the Middle East that has no oil!" Israel has always been the barren state, but recent excavations of natural gas and...
Of Presidents and Peace: Could an Iranian President Make a Deal with the US?
On May 23, 1997, Iranian democracy worked. In a surprise to both the electorate and the international community, a little-known cleric named Mohammad Khatami resoundingly defeated the heavily-favored conservative candidate for the presidency of the...
Okinawa Occupied: Current US Naval Bases in Japan
Being a hegemonic global power, the United States has a large presence on all the world's continents. Although the majority of media attention has focused on the US military presence in the Middle East, the United States also holds a strong presence...
Open for Business? the Future of US Tourism
The Visa Waiver Program (VWP), which allows foreigners from certain countries to enter the United States without a visa for less than 90 days, has grown from a pilot program helping the tourism industry and strengthening diplomatic relations to one...
Right Wing Rising: Eurozone Crisis and Nationalism
Over the past few years, extreme right-wing parties have gained popularity across Europe: performing strongly in opinion polls, winning seats in parliaments, and exercising greater influence over governmental decisions. While the movements vary in...
The Breakout Nation: Indonesia as an Emerging Market
You described the past decade as "freaky," as all countries grew. Can you place the progress of the BRIG countries into global perspective? In the last decade, what we saw was that virtually every single emerging market did well. It was captured...
The Future of NATO: The Purpose of the Alliance after the Cold War
The Secretary-General of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Anders Fogh Rasmussen, likes to say that NATO is the "most successful alliance in history." Few would dispute his claim. During the Cold War, NATO served as a bulwark against the...
The New Griffin of War: Hybrid International Armed Conflicts
Famed seventeenth-century jurist Hugo Grotius warned that in warfare belligerents must "not believe that either nothing is allowable, or that everything is." The latter belief holds that any and all tactics are allowed in warfare, while the former,...
US Business: Adrift in a Global Marketplace
The forces of trade protection in the United States are on the rise--yet again. The presidential campaign has provided a new opportunity for some to take a more isolationist position on issues of international commerce. However, these interest groups...
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