U.S. Catholic

This magazine publishes news, opinions and reviews about issues concerning the everyday lives of Catholics.

Articles from Vol. 70, No. 1, January

All Work and No Pray? Five Ways to Be a Spiritual Survivor
Anne Satorius is a pretty typical hardworking, faithful Catholic. She teaches catechism at her parish in Milwaukee; she and her husband, Tim, edit the newspaper at their daughter s school (where they also serve on the PTO); she looks after her aging...
A Scandal's Silver Lining
During a stint as a high school religion teacher last year, I was required to attend a workshop on recognizing the signs of child sexual abuse by adults. Despite the importance of the topic, one colleague's comment summarized the general feeling: "We...
Confessions of a Bad Catholic: As Fellow Parishioners Passionately Condemned All Those Waffling Catholics Who Needed to Be Shown the Error of Their Ways, I Kept Silent. I'm One of "Those People."
I'm not a good Catholic. I can be arrogant, intolerant, and self-centered. I'm judgmental, I swear, and I can (and do) say perfectly horrible things about nice people in very entertaining ways. I don't get really enraged too often these days, but...
Feedback
Q: The best story I've heard of why someone was given a particular name is ... We had to pray long and hard for our first child. In gratitude we named our son John, which means "gift of God." Agnes Dietrich Shokan, N.Y. My mom is named...
Is Winning the Game Failing the Student? Chasing Athletic Trophies and Pots of Gold, Catholic Schools Are Dropping the Ball
ANDREW FAILED ENGLISH CLASS FALL QUARTER. SCHOOL policy rendered the football team's star halfback academically ineligible for that weekend's playoff game. Yet there he stood at the heart of the Friday afternoon pep rally. The dean--who also happened...
Nothing but the Truth: The Unfinished Business of the Sex-Abuse Crisis: The Editors Interview Anne M. Burke
As the wife of a veteran Chicago alderman, Judge Anne M. Burke has seen her share of political intrigue up close. But not even Chicago politics, she says, adequately prepared her for the "medieval, certainly Byzantine machinations" she encountered...
Office Work: Praying the Liturgy of the Hours Three Times a Day Keeps Me in Good Company
I BECAME A BENEDICTINE OBLATE--A "PRAYER PARTNER" of the local monks--because I wanted to belong to a community with roots deep enough to counteract the dizzying impermanence of living in a place where neighbors move every time property values go up....
Painters Anonymous
WHEN CHARLES ROHRBACHER'S GRANDMOTHER died in 1975, he discovered something surprising in her room that offered a glimmer of what his future held. A picture of Christ--an icon--was right by her bed with a rosary lying on top. Rohrbacher had painted...
Saints Alive! Don't Name Our Child after a Luxury Car: What's in a Name? for Catholics, One Would Hope a Saintly Role Model. but That's Less Likely These Days Thanks to the Popularity of Trendy, Creative, and Even Consumeristic Names
I WORK IN HIGHER education, so I have the good fortune of working with a new group of young people every year. When I began my career, about every third young woman I met was named Jennifer, Stephanie, or Jessica. Now I meet Ashleys, Tiffanys, and...
Science Fiction: If We Fail to Fire Up Our "Little Grey Cells," Following the Evidence Is Likely to Lead to Forensic Fundamentalism
DON'T LOOK NOW, BUT JERRY BRUCKHEIMER'S hit show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is replicating itself faster than the bugs Gil Grissom (William Petersen) finds under victims' toenails. In the beginning Grissom and his science geeks took on the villains...
The Pope Is Rich! and Other Vatican Myths
ROME -- Over the centuries, the Vatican has been a magnet for legends, myths, and conspiracy theories such as that of the infamous (and completely fictitious) Pope Joan. In part this is because the odd dress, ritual, and language of the Holy See...
These Thy Gifts: Chicago Photographer Lloyd DeGrane Captures the Holy Act of Eating
The sharing of food is the holiest of human arts, far older than history, and the finding and gathering and cooking and presenting of food, and giving thanks for it, and sighing with pleasure over it, and singing the praises of the cook--these acts...
The Unknown Tolkien
Not too many people have an inkling that J.R.R. Tolkien's birthday is January 3. Nor do many people know that 113 years ago the author of The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, and many other works of fantasy was born not in England but in Bloemfontein,...
Thou Shalt Not Forget the Beatitudes: The Ten Commandments Are Recognized as the Guideline for Our Lives, but the Beatitudes Call Us to an Even Deeper Challenge
A PROFESSOR AT THE LOCAL SEMINARY USED TO TELL this joke: Moses came down from Mount Sinai and addressed his brother. "Good news and bad news, Aaron! The good news is: I got him down to 10. The bad news is: Adultery is still in!" The Ten Commandments,...
Why Does the Priest Pour Water into the Wine and Put a Piece of the Bread into the Cup?
Both actions are very ancient and began as practical necessities, but eventually the necessities disappeared and were even forgotten. Later when Christians started to ask what these two gestures meant, they began to interpret the actions symbolically....
Wilderness Training: America's "Progressives" Could Benefit from a Short Political Retreat in the Desert
NAIL-BITING THEIR WAY THROUGH A FEW TENSE hours on November 2, in the end self-described "progressives" in America's blue states only found more reason to wonder how--even if--they fit into the nation's changing political and cultural landscape. ...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.