Urban History Review

This journal publishes articles and research notes in the field of Canadian urban history.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 2, March

Apartment Housing in Canadian Cities, 1900-1940
Abstract: Apartment houses may be considered as a deviation from the North American ideal of single-family, owner-occupied homes. Unsurprisingly, therefore, they attracted substantial criticism when first erected in Canadian cities, especially in...
Chez Fadette: Girlhood, Family, and Private Space in Late-Nineteenth-Century Saint-Hyacinthe
Abstract: The histories of domestic space and domestic life have been written relatively independently in Canada. This article describes the preliminary results of an interdisciplinary project intended to narrow that gap. Based on both textual and...
Claims on Housing Space in Nineteenth-Century Montreal
Abstract: Space per person is a fundamental measure of equity in an urban society. From small samples of the Montreal population over the years 1861-1901, we infer substantial improvement in the average dwelling space available per person, but an...
Ethnicity and Home Ownership in Montreal, 1921-51
Abstract: Montreal has long been perceived as "a city of tenants" in a North-American world of owners. This perception has been explained by the strong presence of French Canadians who were poor and had a lower preference for home ownership. ...
"-- to Produce the Highest Type of Manhood and Womanhood": The Ontario Housing Act, 1919, and a New Suburban Ideal
Abstract: While most scholars generally focus on the failings of the post-WWI Federal-Provincial housing scheme in Canada, we contend that it had far-reaching implications for three major facets of urbanism: housing policy, town planning, and residential...