Urban History Review

This journal publishes articles and research notes in the field of Canadian urban history.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 2, June

Editorial: The Historical Geography of Canadian Urban Industry
Manufacturing is of critical importance to the understanding of urban development because it contains many of the clues for deciphering the dynamics, nature and intensity of urban growth, and for interpreting the economic and social geographies of...
Fragmented Integration: The Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company and the Anatomy of an Urban-Industrial Landscape, C.1912
Abstract: This paper examines how forces of fragmentation within the Maritimes contribute a partial but important explanation of the urban-industrial collapse that marked the region in the early 20th century. Specifically, weaknesses that affected...
Location Patterns of Manufacturing: Toronto in the Early 1880s
Abstract: The literature on cities simplifies both industrial structure and location patterns of manufacturing in nineteenth-century urban areas, and it conceives of change narrowly in terms of innovations in transportation technology at or after...
Mapping the Changes: The Spatial Development of Industrial Montreal, 1861-1929
Abstract: In 1991, a research team centred at Concordia University undertook a contract for the city of Montreal. The task was to prepare an inventory of all industrial establishments that had been in existence in the city between the 1820s and...
"Our Prosperity Rests upon Manufactures": Industry in the Central Canadian Urban System, 1871
Abstract: How urban was industrial activity in 1871, when only one in five Canadians lived in incorporated cities, towns or villages? This paper explores central Canada's urban-industrial system at a time of transition in industrial technology,...