Urban History Review

This journal publishes articles and research notes in the field of Canadian urban history.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 1, Fall

A Changing of the Guard: Regional Planning in Ottawa, 1945-1974
Abstract This paper examines the evolution of planning in Ottawa's metropolitan region between 1945 and 1974--a period of significant change in the city's planning history. (1) As elsewhere, planners and policy-makers in Ottawa were coming under...
"A Grey Wee Town": An Environmental History of Early Silver Mining at Cobalt, Ontario (1)
Abstract Cobalt was Ontario's first mining-boom town and at its height was the world's fourth-largest producer of silver. The initial discovery of silver in 1903 led to a rush that saw the town grow to several thousand inhabitants within a decade....
How Did Calgary Get Its River Parks?
Abstract How did Calgary get its river parks? They certainly were not there to begin with. They weren't there as the city grew. They had to be built. As this paper shows, they were constructed relatively recently, and only after an astonishingly...
Lights Out: Conserving Electricity for War in the Canadian City, 1939-1945
Abstract Economic mobilization in Canada during the Second World War drove a major expansion in power demand in cities of the industrial heartland. To meet the needs of wartime industry, the federal government imposed power conservation measures,...
Reflections on the Nature of an Urban Bog
Abstract Camosun Bog has existed for approximately two thousand years. Little is known about its use by indigenous people, but it was left essentially undisturbed by European newcomers until the twentieth century. Then, as the population of Vancouver...
"Said Tree Is a Veritable Nuisance": Ottawa's Street Trees 1869-1939
Abstract Street trees exist in an ambiguous space between built and natural environments, their status reflecting shifting attitudes towards the natural world. Their place was especially evident in debates over street trees in Ottawa between 1869...
The Nature of Cities: Perspectives in Canadian Urban Environmental History
Capilano Canyon seems in a realm quite separate from Vancouver. Steep rock walls, mossy and wet; rapids and pools tracing a thin line from snowpack to ocean; ferns and Douglas firs--all remote from the suburbs that surround them. To descend into the...
Urban Waste Sinks as a Natural Resource: The Case of the Fraser River (1)
Abstract The discursive and material construction of rivers as natural waste-treatment systems highlights important historical connections between urban sanitary networks, conservation ideology, and urban environmental values in the twentieth century....