Urban History Review

This journal publishes articles and research notes in the field of Canadian urban history.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 2, Spring

A Janus-Like Asylum: The City and the Institutional Confinement of the Mentally Ill in Victorian Ontario
Introduction The history of mental health and psychiatry has witnessed tremendous popularity among scholars. The literature is vast, and constitutes, alongside the history of public health, one of the most popular fields within the history of medicine....
An Epidemic without Enmity: Explaining the Missing Ethnic Tensions in New Haven's 1918 Influenza Epidemic
In the autumn of 1918, as troops in Europe waged the final battles of the First World War, city health officials in New Haven, Connecticut--and worldwide--began to confront a virulent and highly infectious strain of influenza. With over a thousand...
Introduction
The history of epidemics has been a staple of academic inquiry over the last generation. From "King Cholera" to the "White Plague," there has been a morbid fascination with the grim realities of modern disease outbreaks, whether epidemic or endemic....
Preparing for the Pandemic: City Boards of Health and the Arrival of Cholera in Montreal, New York, and Philadelphia in 1832
As cholera spread through North America in the spring and summer of 1832, cities found themselves forced to combat the epidemic with minimal support from federal, provincial, or state governments. Historians of the disease have rightly made the city...
Public Health, Yellow Fever, and the Making of Modern Tampico
In the nineteenth century, emergent cities were important to Mexico's becoming a modern nation-state. Our understanding of the process, however, remains incomplete. There are abundant studies of the process for Mexico City, but a limited number analyze...
Shock Cities: The Environmental Transformation and Reform of Manchester and Chicago
Platt, Harold. Shock Cities: The Environmental Transformation and Reform of Manchester and Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005. Alexis de Tocqueville saw it as a "monstrosity": a city where industrial revolution provoked population...