Urban History Review

This journal publishes articles and research notes in the field of Canadian urban history.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 1, Fall

A Regional Perspective on Canadian Suburbanization: Reflections on Richard Harris's Creeping Conformity
Abstract Richard Harris's recently published Creeping Conformity offers a carefully reasoned interpretation of the country's evolving suburban landscape from the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. In particular, Harris argues that Canadian...
From Summer Cottage Colony to Metropolitan Suburb: Toronto's Beach District, 1889-1929
Abstract Over four decades beginning in the 1890s, the east-end Toronto district now known as "The Beach" was transformed from a summer second-home setting into a metropolitan suburb dominated by the middle classes (occupationally defined). Using...
How East New York Became a Ghetto
Thabit, Walter. How East New York Became a Ghetto. New York: New York University Press, 2003. Pp. xv, 304, maps, notes, index. Inner-city communities across the United States have experienced devastating decline over the past half-century. How did...
Raising Consumers: Children and the American Mass Market in the Early Twentieth Century
Jacobson, Lisa. Raising Consumers: Children and the American Mass Market in the Early Twentieth Century. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004. Raising Consumers: Children and the American Mass Market in the Early Twentieth Century is a well-written...
Understanding the Built Form of Industrialization along the Lachine Canal in Montreal
Abstract This article tracks the morphogenesis of one of the birthplaces of Canadian industry: the Lachine Canal corridor in Montreal. The authors propose a reading of the evolution of the artifacts and spatial forms to be found along the canal...