The Washington Monthly

An independent monthly magazine devoted to politics, government, culture, and the media in America, from a progressive perspective. Publishes investigative and opinion-based feature articles by notable authors, short news items, humorous sidebars, and boo

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 7-8, July-August

Everyone's a Loser: How Lottery Ads Entice the Wrong People to Gamble
Tom had been playing the lottery for two years when God started whispering in his ear. At first, Tom (who asked that his last name be withheld) would spend just a few dollars a week. He had his regular numbers, and he'd play them when he thought of it....
Laws for Sale
Washington state's Republican Senator Slade Gorton was as eager as a six-year-old with a brand-new toy. The draft for a new Endangered Species Act had just been completed, and he wanted to introduce it on the floor of the Senate as soon as possible....
MacNeil Error
People watch The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour because it's Serious Television News. Not bound to 22 minutes of commercial-driven images like the networks, the PBS show penetrates issues with in-depth reports and debates. It needn't entertain--it educates....
The Case for Unions
When Safeway told its northern Californian workers earlier this year that it was "redefining"--read "narrowing"--health benefits, the grocery store giant pleaded poverty: Competition from discounters and superstores was forcing it to cut costs. So imagine...
The FEMA Phoenix
Rarely had the failure of the federal government been so apparent and so acute. On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew leveled a 50-mile swath across southern Florida, leaving nearly 200,000 residents homeless and 1.3 million without electricity. Food,...
The Media's Japan Problem
The "right-hand drive" story circulated quickly through the American editorial pages. The U.S. threat to impose nearly $6 billion in tariffs on Japanese luxury car exports unless the Japanese opened their markets was ill-advised, the editorials argued,...
You Can't Fix It If You Don't Raise the Hood
The Republican chopping block is overflowing. The Department of Energy can certainly go. Commerce, too, is dispensable. Education? We'll be better off without it, they say. For good measure, throw in Housing and Urban Development. Top it off with scores...