The Washington Monthly

An independent monthly magazine devoted to politics, government, culture, and the media in America, from a progressive perspective. Publishes investigative and opinion-based feature articles by notable authors, short news items, humorous sidebars, and boo

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 1-2, January-February

A House Divided
Why asking Congress to perform two often contradictory jobs--legislating and overseeing--is asking for trouble There were newspaper accounts of cost over-runs, murmurings of design defects, and rumors of opposition within the Pentagon. In January...
Ban the Designated Hitter
Sports, as any cliche-spouting coach will happily tell you, are like life. How true, how true. Today, though, I'm pleased to introduce my own corollary to this most overused of truths. Sometimes, sports are like a particular slice of life: the public...
Curb Violence by Targeting Bullets
The first battle in America's war at home has won. That battle was over simply acknowledging that the war existed in the first place--that even though violence has not increased appreciably in recent years, we've been in a state of denial about its...
End FBI Background Checks, Abolish Peremptory Strikes
My contemporary files are haphazard and my brain is rusty on applications of the Monthly gospel, so long have I been soaking in the racial and religious affairs of 30 years ago. Removed from public debate--in fact just now learning who Tim Russert...
Government Can Work
Where it got us in the past and how to get it back on track I had my job interview at The Washington Monthly in February 1976. Everything went extremely well. In those days most of the life of the magazine took place in three locations, none of...
Make National Service Mandatory for All
In 1973, the United States made a big mistake--and so did I. That year, an unlikely coalition of anti-Vietnam War liberals and Milton Friedman-inspired conservatives convinced Richard Nixon and Congress to abolish the military draft. Also that year,...
The Media's Rush to Judgment
Quick, facile pronouncements on Clinton, the Gulf War, and Japan dramatize a dangerous new tendency: a McLaughlinized press would rather jump to conclusions than work to get it right When I started working for this magazine nearly 22 years ago,...
What Will Rogers Could Teach the Age of Limbaugh
A voice of selflessness and consensus might sound out of place today, but without one, nothing we need to do will get done No money, no banks, no work, no nothing, but they know they got a man in there who is wise to Congress, wise to our big bankers,...