The Washington Monthly

An independent monthly magazine devoted to politics, government, culture, and the media in America, from a progressive perspective. Publishes investigative and opinion-based feature articles by notable authors, short news items, humorous sidebars, and boo

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 3, March

7 Mistakes Superheroines Make: Why the Latest Action-Babe Flicks Flopped
Four years ago, just as beefy, formerly bankable action stars like Steven Seagal, Sylvester Stallone, and Arnold Schwarzenegger were getting a little grayer, a little slower, and a whole lot less popular at the Cineplex, Hollywood rediscovered women....
Battered Women: Female Boxing Is Brutal and Hopeless
When I was just out of college I worked as a newspaper reporter in Philadelphia, and we used to go to Friday night boxing fights at a club called the Blue Horizon, on an iffy block of North Broad Street at precisely the point where Center City peters...
Ignorance Is Bliss? Ken Lay May Have Been as Clueless as His Lawyers Claim. It Shouldn't Matter
Conspiracy of Fools By Kirt Eichenwald Broadway, $26.00 When Enron collapsed three years ago, it was reasonable to anticipate the story that would one day be told of how the nation's seventh-largest company lost its way. Maybe the once-lean...
Is Grover over? Norquist's Anti-Tax Jihad Stumbles in the States
If ever two men seemed to share one political soul, surely they were Grover Norquist and Mitch Daniels. From his perch as president of Americans for Tax Reform, Norquist was the architect of President Bush's strategy to cut taxes every year and has...
Micro-Profile: The State Department Official Who Teaches Big-Money Donors How to Be Ambassadors
So you raised a bunch of money for the Bush campaign and, for your efforts, you've just been named ambassador to some tropical paradise--but the extent of your previous involvement in international diplomacy consists of watching the Harlem Globetrotters...
Off Track: America's Economy Is Losing Its Competitive Edge, and Washington Hasn't Noticed
There is a moment in the lifespan of every cool new gadget--two years after Bill Gates buys one, a year and a half after the popular press gets wind of it--that its price drops enough to show up in significant numbers on the shelves at Best Buy, the...
Postmodern Protests: Why Modern Marches Matter Only to Those Who March
On a blisteringly cold Inauguration Day, an assortment of liberal women's groups gathered to stage a counter-inaugural protest in Dupont Circle, three miles out of sight and earshot from the president's swearing-in on Capitol Hill. A few hundred marchers...
Riches to Rags: How Legendary Fraud Charles Ponzi's Schemes Crumbled
Ponzi's Scheme: The True Story of a Financial Legend By Mitchell Zuckoff Random House, $25.95 A successful scam consists of two essential parts: the fraud and the getaway. An ill-gotten fortune, no matter how spectacular, isn't very useful...
The Case for the Draft: America Can Remain the World's Superpower. or It Can Maintain Its Current All-Volunteer Military. It Can't Do Both
The United States has occupied many foreign lands over the last half century--Germany and Japan in World War II, and, on a much smaller scale, Haiti, Bosnia, and Kosovo in the 1990s. In all these cases, we sponsored elections and handed-off to democratic...
The Newt Republic: Gingrich's Ideas Were Feisty and Combative, but Ultimately as Nihilistic as They Were Visionary
The Enduring Revolution: How the Contract with America Continues to Shape the Nation By Major Garrett Crown, $25.95 Last Sept. 22, nearly 205 Democratic members of the House of Representatives assembled on the capitol steps to proclaim their...
The Worst Job in Washington: They're Still Answering Phones at the Kerry Campaign
In early February three months after the end of the presidential election, I heard that the Kerry-Edwards campaign headquarters was still open for some reason. Curious, I walked from the offices of The Washington Monthly to its building on McPherson...