The Western Journal of Black Studies

Journal focusing on issues regarding the African American experience in the United States.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 4, Winter

Frank Marshall Davis: A Forgotten Voice in the Chicago Black Renaissance
Finding a Voice The rebellious voices of Frank Marshall Davis (1907-87) and his contemporaries, who advocated themes of "cultural conservatorship, racial advancement and political protest" (Barnes, 53), and who explored the complexities of the...
Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Doctrine of Human Dignity
Martin Luther King, Jr. grew up in a well-to-do family in Atlanta, Georgia. Notwithstanding this, King did not escape indirect and direct encounters with one of the cruelest enemies of human dignity--racism. As a young boy he witnessed the racist...
On the Rhetoric of Afrocentricity
One of the many current challenges posed to scholarship is that of the historicity of scholarship itself. One manifestation of this challenge can be seen in critical researcher's contention that current interpretations of the ancient world are themselves...
Racial Inequality: Emphasis on Explanations
Social inequality is a topic of long standing concern in the social science; however, I will not attempt to document the evolution of this concern. In the brief spurn of this article I will be concerned about one principal type of social inequality,...
Rap Music as an Extension of the Black Rhetorical Tradition: "Keepin' It Real"
For rappers, "keepin it real" means being true to the rich legacy of rap. For me, "keepin it real" means being true to the rich legacy from which rap music emanates. It is a legacy that goes beyond the verbal volleys of Muhammad Ali, the pulsating...
The Educational Development of Malcolm X
"I am a simple African man, doing my duty in my own country in the context of our time." Amilcar Cabral 1924-1973 Introduction Malcolm X was simply an African man, doing his duty for his people in the context of his time. He was a "reluctant...
"What's Wrong with Baseball": The Pittsburgh Courier and the Beginning of Its Campaign to Integrate the National Pastime
On February 5, 1933, the grand ballroom of New York City's Commodore Hotel crackled with laughter during an evening of songs, skits, and speeches at the 10th annual New York Baseball Writers' Association dinner. Sportswriters took turns spoofing...
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