The Wilson Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 2, Spring

A Higher Capitalism
FOR TOO LONG, BUSINESSES have pursued narrow, short-term strategies that maximize quick profits and don't address society's greatest needs. They are squandering an incredible opportunity, argue Harvard Business School professor and management strategy...
Asia's Religious Renaissance
DEFYING A CENTURY OF PREDICTIONS that East and Southeast Asia would become increasingly secular in an age of modernization and globalization, these regions are in the grips of a religious resurgence. Intriguingly, it's not a return to old-time religion...
A Tale of Two Literary Cultures
AMERICA IS HOME TO TWO DISTINCT literary cultures, defined by where a writer earns his keep: the university (which we'll refer to as MFA) and the publishing house (hereafter, NYC). Each culture has its own heroes (Stuart Dybek in the former, Philip...
China's Inner Struggle
U.S. POLICYMAKERS HAVE struggled to come up with the right way to handle China as it grows into a superpower. Before they fasten on a specific approach, they should tune in to the debates raging among China's elite about its foreign policy, writes...
Classical Education in America: The Study of Ancient Greek and Latin Long Ago Vanished from Most American Classrooms, and with It Has Gone a Special Understanding of the Values and Virtues Prized by Western Civilization
THE CLASSICS DEPARTMENTS AT MOST AMERICAN colleges and universities today carry the whiff of nostalgia and old chalk dust. Latin and ancient Greek can't compete with vocational disciplines such as engineering, business, and medicine. Classics programs...
Control Yourself: Early Uh-Ohs
In his late seventies, Leo Tolstoy supposedly said, "As I was at five, so I am now." That remark may be more apt than the one about all happy families being alike. A new study finds that behavior in children as young as three can predict troubles in...
Crazy for Caravaggio
IS THERE ANYTHING THAT wouldn't be improved by a dash of Caravaggio? No, apparently. In recent years Caravaggiomania has ripped and roared across the art world, reaching explosive proportions in 2010, the 400th anniversary of the Italian Baroque artist's...
Defying the Democracy Cure
SPURRED BY THE HOPE OF joining the European Union, Turkey embarked on a wave of reform between 1999 and 2004. It abolished its death penalty, liberalized regulation of political parties and the press, and expanded the rights of non-Muslim minorities....
Dense, Denser, Densest: Americans like Their Cities Spacious. Will Concerns about Costs and the Environment Push Them to Rein in Sprawl?
LAST FALL, FOREIGN POLICY PUBLISHED WHAT IT called a global cities index, a list of 65 world cities ranked according to a variety of economic, cultural, and social indicators. Compiled by the consulting firm A. T. Kearney and the Chicago Council on...
DFW 101
WHEN THE CELEBRATED WRITER David Foster Wallace committed suicide in September 2008, at the age of 46, scholarship on his dense, footnote-laced fiction and nonfiction was sparse. Since then, academics have been hard at work filling the void, essentially...
Diversity Dismantled
AMERICAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES have long been governed by two competing ideals: They aim to be both meritocratic centers of intellectual excellence and "model commonwealths" that bring together individuals of diverse backgrounds. The "model...
Friends Who Pray Together
IN STUDY AFTER STUDY, RESEARCHERS have found that religion makes people happy. Nearly 30 percent of people who attend religious services weekly report "extreme" satisfaction with their lives, compared with less than 20 percent of those who steer clear...
Grand Strategy Revisited
SINCE THE END OF THE COLD War, U.S. foreign policy has not produced inspiring results: The United States has been at war roughly two of every three years. The military missions in Iraq and Afghanistan have been long and costly. Three major foreign-policy...
How to Save the Euro
EVERY BROKE COUNTRY IS broke in its own way. At least that's true of the European countries that have come to the brink of default since the global financial crisis unleashed waves of economic panic. In Greece, the cause was a love affair with "enormous,...
India's Vanishing Officers
INDIA'S ARMED FORCES ARE among the largest in the world, with more than 1.3 million troops on active duty. But they are facing a crisis: They can't find enough qualified and willing candidates to fill their junior officer ranks, reports doctoral candidate...
Jump-Starting Nuclear History
Joseph H. Flom 1923-2011 Former chair, Woodrow Wilson Center Board of Trustees WHAT DO WOODROW WILSON Center staff do when they think a crucial academic field is underdeveloped? They try to jump-start it. That's the goal of the Nuclear...
Learning from Al Qaeda
IN OCTOBER 2003, SOON AFTER he arrived in Iraq to head the U.S. Joint Special Operations Task Force, now-retired Army general Stanley A. McChrystal and his fellow commanders got out a whiteboard and started to map out the organizational structure of...
Long Live the Industrial City: Today's Successful Cities Are Often Regarded Strictly as Idea Labs Where Creative Types Gather. but as New York City's Garment District Illustrates, Manufacturing Is Vital to the Innovation That Cities Foster
AGAINST A WALL IN R&C APPAREL'S CROWDED factory, in an unremarkable building on 38th Street on the far western edge of New York City's garment district, is a vast collection of sewing machines shelved with curatorial precision. The collection could...
New to the Neighborhood: How Can Be Called an Urban Pioneer When Move to an Inner-City Neighborhood Where Families Have Lived for Generations?
A YEAR AGO I MOVED INTO A ROW HOUSE IN NORTHEAST Washington, D.C., two miles from the Capitol. I paid $85,000, a price so low it's a punch line in a city where the average home sells for more than $600,000. The hot water heater was missing, and the...
Null Effect
IN 1924 THE NATIONAL RESEARCH Council ran a now famous experiment at Western Electric's Hawthorne plant in Cicero, Illinois. The researchers asked a simple question: Does better lighting make workers more productive? They were surprised by what they...
Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!
IN HER TWO DECADES OF PRACTICING law, Lisa S. Blatt has argued 30 cases before the nation's highest court, more than any other woman in the country. Her up-close-and-personal vantage point has taught her a few things about life at the Supreme Court....
Stores and the City: Many Cities Launched Revival Efforts with Downtown Festival Marketplaces Such as Boston's Faneuil Hall. Can Retailers Work the Same Magic in Less Affluent Neighborhoods?
PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE IS ONE OF AMERICA'S most iconic streets. But if you follow it a few miles east of the White House and across the Anacostia River, you will find yourself in a very different world. The avenue is lined with gas stations, cheek-cashing...
The City Resilient
Thirty years ago, my morning commute took me on foot across New York City's West 42nd Street. It was not a good place to start the day. The street was lined with peepshows, porn theaters, and shabby shops, and its sidewalks were littered with trash...
The Elusive Conservative Majority
REPUBLICANS MAY HAVE trounced the Democrats in the 2010 midterm elections, but if history is any indication, their big gains will be fleeting. The GOP failed to cement electoral wins in 1966,1980, and 1994 into a permanent governing majority. Henry...
The Enduring King James
AS WE NOTED IN "CHAPTER and Verse" ("In Essence," Summer 2010), the King James Bible, published 400 years ago this year, has a long history of shaping Western literature and culture. It has also engendered innumerable modern translations, whose more...
The Inequality Engine
MANY SOCIAL CRITICS ASSAIL rising income inequality in America, but in the assessment of Tyler Cowen, a George Mason University economist and author of the new book The Great Stagnation, it's what is causing the inequality that is truly troubling:...
The Math Beneath
ON THE SURFACE, IT DOESN'T seem that financial modeling has much in common with climate science, ecology, or neuroscience. But in fact these fields are grappling with similar mathematical problems: how to map nonlinear, deeply interconnected systems...
The Revolution That Wasn't
JOHN J. SHEA IS AN ARCHAEOLOGIST. He is also a flintknapper, or someone who makes stone tools. While on a dig at a 195,000-year-old site in the Lower Omo River Valley Kibish Formation in Ethiopia, he was given pause by the stone tools our supposedly...
The School Lunch Wars: Sixty-Five Years Ago, the Federal School Lunch Program Was Created to Make American Schoolchildren Healthier. Today, It Helping to Make Them Fatter. Will a New Law Change the Diets of Millions of Kids Raised on French Fries and Chicken Nuggets?
WHEN COLOMBIA NATIVE BEATRIZ ZULUAGA, a professional cook for 20 years, became the admissions director at CentroNia's DC Bilingual Public Charter School in 2007, she thought she was leaving her old career far behind. Then she laid eyes on the trays...
Tweeting toward Freedom? A Survey of Recent Articles
WHEN EGYPTIAN ACTIVIST AND Google marketing manager Wael Ghonim reflected on the overthrow in February of Hosni Mubarak, he said, "Everything was done by the people [for] the people, and that's the power of the Internet." Some credit a Facebook page...
Unforgettable? Search Censors
Hugo Guidotti Russo, a cosmetic surgeon in Madrid, wants to liposuction his past. The Spanish newspaper El Pals reported in 1991 that Guidotti Russo had been accused of bungling a woman's breast surgery. He told The Wall Street Journal in March that...
Value-Added Classrooms: Learn More, Earn More
Call it the eight percent solution. According to Eric A. Hanushek, an economist at the Hoover Institution, ousting the worst eight percent of America's public school teachers would produce substantial gains for the nation's economy. Hanushek has...
What Is Hugo Chavez Up to? Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez Has Set Alarms Ringing with His Efforts to Create a Global Anti-American Coalition. but in Caracas, Critics Say Their Bombastic President Is Giving Away the Country's Wealth and Getting Snookered by His Newfound Friends
WHEN MUAMMAR AL-QADDAFI FACED WORLDWIDE condemnation this past winter as he brutally struck back against a popular uprising, the Libyan dictator may have taken comfort from knowing he had at least one friend left: Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez....
What War Is Good For
THE DEMISE OF "DON'T ASK, Don't Tell" last December was only the most recent iteration of an old pattern: Over the last century, America's wars abroad have had the salutary side effect of advancing minority rights at home, says Robert P. Saldin, a...
Where Are the Female Politicians?
IT WASN'T VERY LONG AGO THAT almost no women were elected to major political offices. In the 1970s there were two female governors, and it was only in 1978 that the first woman whose husband had never served in Congress was elected to the Senate for...
Woodrow Wilson Center Welcomes New President
On February 8, The Woodrow Wilson Center's board of trustees ushered in a new era with the appointment of Representative Jane Harman (D-Calif.) as the Center's director, president, and CEO. Harman resigned her long-held congressional seat, telling...
Work Hard, Play Harder
THE RULES OF THE COLLEGE Drinking Game are simple: Students must drink excessively, and politicians, college presidents, and public health specialists must rail excessively about the excessive drinking. They're missing the mark, says historian Marshall...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.