The Wilson Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 23, No. 2, Spring

Reviving the Public Intellectual
The academic world has been in agony ever since Russell Jacoby blamed it a dozen years ago for the disappearance of freelance "public intellectuals" in the mold of Lewis Mumford and Edmund Wilson, unaffiliated thinkers who could speak with authority...
Striving for Democracy
Americans, including many historians, like to think of the period from the end of the War of 1812 to the outbreak of the Civil War as an ebullient, egalitarian era, the age of the common man, when ordinary workingmen and farmers came into their own...
The Man Who Loved Cities
William H. Whyte seems fated to be known as The Organization Man man. His death, on January 12, 1999, inspired numerous reflections on his sociological bestseller of 1956. Recognized as a benchmark in its own time, The Organization Man gave new meaning...
The Status of the Dream
Nelson Mandela is soon to leave office after five history-making years as president of South Africa. The magnitude of the challenges his government faced - and of the progress it made - is only now becoming clear, for South Africa has been in the throes...
Two Cheers for Materialism
It's the thing that everybody loves to hate. But let's face it, our author says, materialism - getting and spending - is a vital source of meaning and happiness in the modern world. Of all the strange beasts that have come slouching into the 20th...
Was America Born Capitalist?
Of all the "isms" that afflict us, capitalism is the worst. According to many scholars, capitalism has been ultimately responsible for much of what ails us, in both the past and the present, including our race problem, our grossly unequal distribution...
What Makes Technology Grow?
An excerpt from an essay by Paul M. Romer in Outlook (No. 1, 1998), Andersen Consulting's "journal on changing to be more successful." Romer is a Senior Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of economics in the Graduate School of...
Why Export Democracy?; the 'Hidden Grand Strategy' of American Foreign Policy Is Reemerging into Plain View after a Long Cold War Hibernation
The "hidden grand strategy" of American foreign policy is reemerging into plain view after a long Cold War hibernation. To hear critics tell it, the American preoccupation with promoting democracy around the world is the product of a dangerous idealistic...

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