The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 11, November

America at War - National Day of Prayer and Remembrance
President Bush spoke the following on September 14, 2001, during the National Day of Prayer and Remembrance for the victims of the terrorist attacks at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. We are here in the middle hour of our grief. So many...
America in the Eyes of Eastern Europe
Tomislav (Thomas) Sunic, a former professor of political science at Juniata College in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and a former Croatian diplomat, is the author of several books and numerous essays. He currently resides in Europe. While a massive...
America's Role - as the Israeli-Palestinian War of Attrition Enters Its Second Year, an Intense Debate Is Taking Place over the Content, Scope, and Future Direction of America's Policy in the Middle East
As the Israeli-Palestinian war of attrition enters its second year, and following the tragic events of September 11 in New York City and Washington, D.C., an intense debate is taking place over the content, scope, and future direction of America's...
America's Role - Chronology of the Israeli-Arab Conflict
1897--The First Zionist Congress convenes in Switzerland and issues Basel Program to settle Palestine. 1917--Balfour Declaration: Britain pledges support for the establishment of a Jewish national home in Palestine. 1919--First Arab Palestine...
A National Test Would Lift All Boats
The following two articles analyze the controversy over President Bush's national student testing plan and come to differing conclusions. Is national student testing a good idea? Should we be testing our children more than we already are? If the...
A Place of Legends - Rumored to Be the Birthplace of a Factual King Arthur, the Windswept Ruins of Tintagel Castle on England's Cornwall Coast Mystify and Intrigue Historians and True Believers in the Arthurian Legend
The wind is blowing so hard outside my bedroom window that the glass is rattling to the point of shattering in the old wooden pane. The bed underneath me shudders violently, along with the walls and floor. Shrieking gales and thunder startle me awake...
A Red, White, and Blue Nation
Since the agonizingly narrow presidential election last November, Americans have been haunted by the specter of a divided America. Etched in our minds is a twin-hued map--the "red" Gore nation of the secular, elitist East and West Coasts and the "blue"...
Back to Bulawayo - Novelist Yvonne Vera's Decision to Leave Canada and Return to Her Homeland of Zimbabwe
Charles R. Larson is professor of literature at American University in Washington, D.C., and the fiction and book editor of Worldview. Larson's books include The Emergence of African Fiction (1972); he edited the anthology Under African Skies: Modern...
Born in Frost and Wave - the North Norway Festival
Far beyond the Arctic Circle, an annual festival brings cutting-edge arts to northern Norway, helping to bind distant communities together through a shared creative effort. The Norwegian national character is unique, combining intellectual introspection...
Brain Teasers - in David Lodge's Twelfth Novel, British Academics Dip into Hot Tubs and Streams of Consciousness
Linda Simon is professor of English at Skidmore College. The author of Genuine Reality: A Life of William James (Harcourt Brace, 1998), Of Virtue Rare (1982), Thornton Wilder: His World (1979), and The Biography of Alice B. Toklas (1977), she edited...
Checkup of Earth from on High
By aerial and satellite monitoring of variations in soil moisture, surface temperature, and vegetation, it has become possible to predict crop yields and weather patterns such as floods, droughts, and tornadoes. During April and May of this year,...
Checkup of Earth from on High - Sensors Everywhere
Jean L. Steiner is research leader of the Great Plains Agroclimate and Natural Resources program, conducted at the USDA-ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory in El Reno, Oklahoma. The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has an exceptionally broad...
Cuisine of the Khanates - from the Days of Genghis Khan to the Present, the Food of the Great Mongol Empire Has Been Shaped as Much by Its Foreign Rulers as by the Lands It Conquered
"My time in Mongolia taught me one thing about the Mongols," I remember my maternal grandfather saying. "Never underestimate them." When war broke out between Russia and Japan in 1904, my grandfather, a mercurial Muscovite fluent in seven languages,...
Divergent Paths - Brahman Computer Programmers Ponder Their Future
On the sandy bank of the Yamuna River in northern India, a wizened old man dressed only in a loincloth sits on a low wooden platform. He is chanting a mantra over the head of a pure-white cow. A thin, shabbily dressed farmer from a nearby village holds...
Does It End? Death and Afterlife in Middle Eastern Creation Stories
If there is a beginning, the end will usually follow. Death is a natural end to all living beings on earth, but this does not mean that its finality is easily acceptable. For thousands of years, people have been trying to decide, whether individually...
Fighting to Halt the War against Women
Mr. Jones (not his real name) finished writing on the blackboard the names of students who had misbehaved that day. He would soon take the youngsters to the principal's office. But among the names was that of a shy, intelligent 11-year-old girl who...
Friend and Foe - Elixir of Life
When Arabs introduced the science of distillation into Europe during the Middle Ages, alchemists believed that alcohol was the long-sought elixir of life. Alcohol was therefore held to be a remedy for practically all diseases, as indicated by the term...
Friend and Foe - the Middle Eastern Origins of Beer
In ancient Egyptian mythology, Ra, king of the gods, sent his daughter, the goddess Hathor, to punish mankind--"the children of his tears"--for their evil deeds. Hathor descended to earth and raged through villages and towns, killing every man, woman,...
Ice over Earth
Controversy surrounds the proposal that one or more glacial holocausts engulfed our planet more than 600 million years ago. Neatly displayed in exposed rocks in Wales is an extraordinary message first recognized by a prominent British geologist,...
In the Company of Cowboys - Working in Wyoming's Cattle Country
It's early March and the cottonwood and Russian olive that line the river have yet to bud. The year's new grasses and alfalfa shoots are still not visible. The earth is brown and yellow and bare. Reaching above the badlands to the east, the sun throws...
Israeli Dilemmas - Ariel Sharon's Policy of Restraint Has Failed So Far to Restore Security and Reverse the Consequences of the Failed Oslo Process
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon came to power in February 2001 during one of the most problematic periods in Israel's history, following the failure of the July 2000 Camp David Israeli-Palestinian talks and the subsequent outbreak of Palestinian violence...
It Would Be One Test Too Many
This article and the previous one analyze the controversy over President Bush's national student testing plan and come to differing conclusions. In a recent weekly newsmagazine I saw an editorial cartoon showing two small boys weighed down with...
Lanny Bergner - out of His Gourd
Lanny Bergner creates fantastic, organic worlds from common materials and gourds. At his studio on Fidalgo Island off Washington State, the artist wields a fertile imagination, turning trips to the hardware store and the garden--he grows his own gourds--into...
Mapping Home
Charlotte Bacon's radiant novel traverses the emotional terrain of four generations of determined women. Linda Simon is associate professor of English at Skidmore College. The multigenerational novel often results in thick tomes chronicling the...
Palestinian Fictions - Spillover
The Israeli-Palestinian violence of the past year has reverberated throughout the region. Not only do Middle Easterners read about the clashes, they experience the graphic and often gory images nightly in their living rooms, via satellite television....
Palestinian Fictions - Yasser Arafat Stands Alone as the Undisputed Leader of the Palestinian Authority and the Palestinians
One year and going strong, the miniwar between Israel and the Palestinian Authority (PA) that has come to be known as the al-Aqsa intifada has shown no signs of abating, at least until the time of the terrorist attack on September 11. Indeed, neither...
Rhapsody for Peace - Reconciliation in Transylvania
The universal language of the arts is helping in efforts to resolve long-standing tensions between Hungarians, Romanians, and ethnic Hungarians in Romania. It's unusual when young Hungarians from the minority population in Romania come together...
September 11, 2001
Civilization suffered a grievous blow on September 11. The nation, led by President Bush and Mayor Giuliani, responded magnificently. Our grief was matched by the heroism of New York's firefighters and policemen and also by that of many ordinary Americans....
Taps for Medicinal Marijuana
In a unanimous ruling, the Supreme Court shot down California Proposition 215, passed by the people of California in 1996. Readers will recall (The World & I, May 2001) that Proposition 215 made it legal under California law for a seriously...
The Decline of Local TV News
The news about the news is not good. According to several recent studies, local television news stations are losing viewers, and they have only themselves to blame. Both viewer polls and media professional surveys show that when stations forget...
The Melting Pot, Part 2 - America's Cultural-Institutional Core
Anne Wortham is associate professor of sociology at Illinois State University. In part 1 of this examination of the melting pot ideal ("The Melting Pot: Are We There Yet?" The World & I, September 2001, 261), I argued that the "melting" process,...
The Middle East: War or Peace?
The world's most contentious region, the Middle East, is up in arms again. Since the meeting over a year ago between Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat to discuss final arrangements for peace, there have been terrorist...
The Soul of Brazil
A mammoth trove of Brazilian art from the Baroque period to the present is being parceled out for multiple exhibits in the Western Hemisphere and Europe for all eyes to see. Five centuries of cultural fermentation and evolution in one of the world's...
The Tormented Fatherland - Wolfgang Koeppen's Profound Novels from the 1950s Shed a Harsh Light on Germany's Angst Following World War II-And They Are Remarkably Contemporary
While Robert Ross' major field is postcolonial literature, he has long taken an interest in postwar German fiction. He currently lives in Aachen, Germany. Book Info:THE HOTHOUSE Wolfgang Koeppen Translated by Michael Hofmann Publisher:New York:...
The United States in the 21st Century
Stephen Joel Trachtenberg is president and professor of public administration at George Washington University. As it enters the third millennium, the United States--while on its way to becoming a nation of 300 million people--has grown used to hearing...
We Are Our Genes-Not!
Given the complexity of relationships between our genetic makeup, intracellular networks, and environmental factors, it is wrong to assume that genes are the ultimate determinants of our abilities, health, and destiny. About ten years ago, Nobel...
We Are Our Genes-Not! History of Discrimination
In the United States, the history of discrimination in the areas of reproductive freedom, eligibility for military service, and employment options is a sobering one. For instance, during the 1920s and _30s, dozens of states engaged in involuntary sterilization...
We Are Our Genes-Not! How Will Genetic Tests Be Used?
For many of us, dozens of screening tests for genetic diseases will likely become available within our lifetimes. The results of most of these tests will disclose whether a person has a predisposition toward getting a disease, but they will carry much...