The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 6, June

Alaska for Beginners : How First-Time Visitors Can Get the Most out of a Visit to America's Last Frontier
I stop paddling, and the kayak glides across the silky smooth surface of the fjord. Reaching down into the water with outstretched hands, I feel the cold black ocean rush between my fingers until the little vessel loses momentum and gradually slides...
Are We Our Brothers' Keepers? : The Challenges to Providing Education in Low- Income Countries Are Daunting, but Wealthy Nations Are Responsible to Reach out to the Less Fortunate
How can the United States and other Western countries effectively help the development of low-income countries? How can we lower the tensions and misunderstandings that derive from large discrepancies in wealth and social opportunity? Fortunately,...
At Home Away from Home: Multilingual Switzerland
Switzerland has three official languages. According to the most recent figures from the Federal Office of Statistics, 63.7 percent of Swiss residents speak German either exclusively or as a first language; 20.4 percent speak French and 6.5 percent...
At Home Away from Home : The English-Speaking Community in Switzerland
Live in Zurich for a while and you'll start to hear peculiar things. Words that you actually understand will rise out of the din of Swiss German and stop you in your tracks. This isn't because your German lessons are finally paying off; it is indeed...
At the Head of the Class : A Long Journey to the Guillotine
Fred Olivier, who was my high school English teacher for freshman, sophomore, and senior years, introduced me to Shakespeare, the beginning of a lifelong love. He introduced me to A Tale of Two Cities, which is my favorite book to this day. He introduced...
Attractive Opposites: Wood Artists Ron Fleming and Binh Pho
Two talented artists, one from Oklahoma, the other from Vietnam, begin creating turned-wood vessels but go off in stylistically contrasting directions. The results are both intriguing and educational. Take two bright stars on the American woodcrafts...
Capturing Nature's Palette : The Photography of Eliot Porter
Explorer, scientist, conservationist, and, perhaps above all, gifted photographer, Eliot Porter cataloged nature's majesty like no one else. "True art," wrote Henry David Thoreau, "is but the expression of our love of nature." Perhaps no artist...
Day to Day: The Wealth of Markets and Crafts in Ghana
Just a few minutes' drive from the elegant chalets and contemporary luxuries of Accra's La Palm Hotel, one comes face to face with African reality: a huge, sprawling open-air market. Shabby stalls form a dusty maze that extends as far as the eye can...
Education and Development
The Special Report in Current Issues this month is "Education: The Key to Global Development." Indeed, education is a weapon for Third World development. It is important to recognize and contribute to this process. However, this orientation to the...
Education: The Key to Global Development
Ask parents in the United States what they want for their children and, after good health, the answer is a good education. In the face of this universal truth, however, more and more parents are concerned about what exactly their schools are teaching....
Eliot Porter : Coloring the Mood
"The central theme of Eliot Porter's photographs," wrote Weston Naef, former associate curator of prints and drawings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, "is not botany, ornithology, or geology, although an understanding of these bodies of knowledge...
From This Month's Menu
The last two U.S. wars, in Afghanistan and Iraq, have followed the same interesting pattern when reflected in the media. After a week or so, warnings of failed plans and insufficient forces filled the op-ed pages and the airwaves, jostling for space...
Glasses for the Masses
Part scientist, part industrialist, all visionary, Stanford Ovshinsky has harnessed his glassy materials for planet-improving applications ranging from photovoltaic cells to a new standard in computer memory. After nearly a half-century of groundbreaking...
HBO: Getting Wired
You can't keep a good show down. Police-drama fans will get their fix as HBO brings back The Wire, which this season has its veteran officers trying to keep the lid on crime at the Baltimore waterfront. The HBO police-drama series The Wire aired...
If We Can't Quench Our Thirst
Serious water deficits could become a major force toward fundamental change in such long-standing practices as generating power in central stations, surrounding homes with grassy lawns, eating meat, and maintaining crops with chemical fertilizers and...
Journalist for World Freedom
Democracy and freedom would be enormously boosted the world over if the Western media devoted more attention to covering human rights violations, according to A.M. Rosenthal, former managing editor and executive editor of the New York Times. "I...
Liar, Liar : In His Latest, Highly Cerebral Novel, John Banville Once Again Explores the Murky Depths of Identity
Tom Deignan, a columnist and editor at the Irish Voice in New York City, has just published Coming to America: The Irish Americans (Barron's). He is also at work on a novel about New York in the 1960s. "I am, as is surely apparent by now, a thing...
Media Miseducation on the Middle East
John Attarian's review of What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News in the Book World section is right on. But the left-wing bias of Peter Jennings and Dan Rather is so extreme that I have difficulty containing my outrage. On March 21,...
Mirage in the Desert
Kenneth Richard Fox, M.D., graduated from Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1972. He trained in ophthalmology at Case Western Reserve University and at the University of London's Moorfield Eye Hospital as a fellow in retinal and vitreous...
Mira Nair: Intoxicated with Life
In films such as Salaam Bombay and Monsoon Wedding, Indian-born filmmaker Mira Nair carves an independent path, eschewing the conventions of both Hollywood and Bollywood. What director Mira Nair wanted to capture in her recent film hit Monsoon Wedding...
Promise and Perils of Education: Education Has Two Sides; the Teacher Must Make an Effort to Lead, and the Students Must Not Merely Sit and Listen but Must Take an Active Role in Their Education
What is the purpose of education? Twenty-odd years ago, as I worked on the roof of our house, I could hear the boys from two houses down practicing the lyrics to a Pink Floyd song, "We don't need no education, we don't need no thought control." True...
Retirement, Baby Boomer Style
Patricia Fry is a freelance writer and publisher from Ojai, California. She is the author of Fatherhood and Fathering: the Ultimate Guide to Today's Dad. There's been a lot of hype about the baby boom generation--born between 1946 and 1964. And...
Rich Nations' Tariffs and Poor Nations' Growth
In an attempt to curb terrorism, international policymakers are now focusing on helping poor countries raise their standard of living, thus hopefully diminishing the appeal of radical, anti-Western ideologies. Beginning with the Conference on Financing...
Seeds of North Korea's Contentiousness
As late as October 2002, North Korea, though labeled by President George W. Bush a member of the "axis of evil," was causing no particular trouble for the United States or its allies in the Far East. Diplomatic and economic relations between North...
The Baltics Reborn : While the Capital Cities of Tallinn and Riga Show That Estonia and Latvia Are Successfully Reclaiming Their Heritage, the Tiny Russian Outpost of Kaliningrad Languishes with a Muddled History and Poor Economy
A decade ago, three small nations--Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia--made huge headlines when they broke away from the Soviet Union and seized their independence. The Baltic region has long been a turbulent corner of the world, conquered over the centuries...
The Dream Car : An American Icon, the Corvette Turns Fifty
In 1951, Harley Earl, the head of styling at General Motors, witnessed a sports car competition at a rally in Watkins Glen, New York. He was impressed. Sports cars were popular among soldiers returning from Europe following World War II. GIs had encountered...
The Fall of Baghdad
Baghdad's fall UNITED STATES--The murderous reign of Saddam Hussein effectively ended [April 9] as downtown Baghdad slipped from the grip of the Iraqi regime and citizens streamed into the streets to celebrate the sudden disintegration of Mr. Hussein's...
The Standardized Classroom
Leslie Rayburn is currently working as a teacher and consultant to home- schooling families in Santa Cruz, California. A classroom teacher for the last twelve years, she is also a freelance writer and photographer. I wouldn't say I was called to...
Those Pesky Skeeters
Widely detested for their eagerness to suck blood and ability to spread disease, mosquitoes boast clever strategies of feeding, breeding, and persisting. On a hot August evening in 1955, Jim Haeger of the Entomological Research Center in Vero Beach,...
T/k
"Batter my heart, three-person'd God; for you As yet but knock; breathe, shine, and seek to mend; That I may rise, and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend Your force, to break, blow, burn, and make me new. I, like an usurp'd town, to another...
T/K : The Passion of John Donne
Laurie Morrow is the host of the talk radio show True North with Laurie Morrow, heard on WDEV 550 AM and 96.1 FM, Burlington, Vermont. A former English professor, she is the president of the Vermont Association of Scholars. Bad poets don't intend...
When the Land Is Worn out : Eating Corn with the Ancestors
Dona Christina Arjona mixes atole--corn porridge--and chocolate. With her right hand she scoops the atole up in a ji'cara, a cup made from a dried gourd, and slowly pours it back into a plastic bucket. Her left hand rests on the shoulder of Rufino,...
When the Land Is Worn out : Last Days of the Maya Campesino
"Look at this," says Don Mario Kahuil. He rips open ear after ear of corn from his damaged milpa (cornfield). He shows me an ear with small and rotting white kernels. "This is nothing. I cannot even feed this to my animals." He spits on the ground,...
Why I Became a Teacher
Audrey Eoff is a teacher who lives in Ft. Worth, Texas. I was unhappy with the private school in which I was teaching. When parents asked me to teach their children at my home and continue the year with them, I became a homeschooler with seven children--none...
Will the U.S. Get Left Behind? : We Must Improve Our High Schools. the Author Offers Seven Ways to Do This
Critics of public schools view the system as requiring privatization, but there is support for the neighborhood public school. In international terms, America's elementary schools are above the middle of the pack, making progress through phonics-based...
Women for Women: The Grassroots Organization Women for Women International Helps Individuals Recover from Wartime Atrocities
Handwritten letters are not so common in today's age of cell phones and email. A personal letter written by a concerned friend can make all the difference to a woman who has lost everything, especially her hope for the future. This premise of connection...
Yuri's Search for the Old Man : A Legend of Ancient Korea
Yuri had several recurring dreams. One was about a sea of immeasurable vastness, inhabited by many strange creatures. In his dream, Yuri stands on the shore looking at the ocean's heaving emptiness. Suddenly, the water begins to seethe and then erupts...