The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 2, February

A Fairy-Tale Afternoon - Buxtehude Is Home to One of Europe's Most Famous Legends
As I arrive at the town hall, I am greeted by three young women dressed as woodland creatures: two hedgehogs and a hare. I soon discover the reason for this strange attire. The small German city of Buxtehude is famous as the setting for the Grimm's...
A Fairy-Tale Afternoon - He Barks with His Tail
Located near Hamburg in the north of Lower Saxony, Buxtehude dates to the tenth century, when Emperor Otto I donated a village called Buochstadon to a monastery in Magdeburg. Two hundred years later, it was known as Buchstadihude. The village had no...
All in the Family - Jonathan Franzen's New Novel Places the American Family under a Microscope and Finds It Teeming with Anxiety and Despair
Peter Filkins' new book of poems, After Homer, has just appeared from George Braziller. He teaches writing and literature at Simon's Rock College of Bard in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Once in a while a novel comes along that is as much a part...
America's New Plague
Beginning with the first cases in 1999, the mosquito-borne West Nile virus has become established in North America, causing illness and claiming the lives of humans, birds, and other warm-blooded animals. For those of us who live in the eastern...
America's New Plague - Crows and Starlings as Carriers?
Among birds, American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) seem particularly susceptible to infection by West Nile virus, based on reported cases of mortality. It is possible, however, that their apparently higher...
America's New Plague - Reducing Personal Risk
While the chances of contracting West Nile virus are extremely low, they can be reduced even further by taking a few simple precautions, especially when traveling in areas where infections by the virus have been documented. Extra care should be taken...
A Reply to Riley
Morton A. Kaplan is Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science Emeritus at the University of Chicago and editor and publisher of The World & I. Mr. Riley says some things that I agree with individually, but I would like to place his...
Art Hansen - Pride of Place
During the last half century, mainstream visual art has come to operate without any aesthetic standards whatsoever and has been driven largely by business interests. Truth, beauty, and dedication to craft have generally been considered irrelevant....
A Skiers' Mountain - One Utah Ski Resort Won't Be an Olympic Venue Largely Because It Receives Too Much Snow, but Its Slopes and Lodge Are North American Classics
All was calm at 5:35 a.m. when I clicked into my skis on the soft snow outside Alta's Rustler Lodge. The deep night sky gave no sign that an epic weeklong storm had passed. Now, a nearly full orange moon perched firmly over the mountain like a sentinel....
Bush's First Year
The Special Report in Current Issues this month is on President Bush's first year, with special emphasis on the periods before and after September 11. I voted for Mr. Bush, but that was a judgment that rested more on a comparison with Al Gore than...
Challenges to Modern-Day Parenting
Anne R. Pierce is an author and political philosopher who lives in Cincinnati with her husband and three children. As a writer, she finds that bringing up children in the modern world gives her much food for thought. Drive through the empty streets...
Don't Make U.S. Foreign Policy a Scapegoat
To the Editor: After the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington [see "Terrorism: A New Kind of War, December 2001, p.18], some liberal commentators have blamed U.S. foreign policy for making America the target of frustrated groups. Foreign...
Empire without End? the Fate of Rome and the Future of America
David Gress is professor of classics at Aarhus University, Denmark, and fellow of the Foreign Policy Research Institute in Philadelphia. He is the author of works on European history and contemporary international relations, among them A History of...
Environmental Watchdogs
Pat Fry is a freelance journalist living in California. What profession might involve fieldwork in such diverse settings as citrus groves, open-pit mines, mortuaries, hazardous waste sites, Arctic radar stations, and business offices? Sharon D'Orsie,...
Executing the Feebleminded
Consider these facts: A man, drunk and high on drugs, goes to a store to buy beer. Not having enough money, he panhandles in the parking lot. He stops a 21-year-old man coming to the store and asks for money. The customer declines. The panhandler then...
Food or Fees? Coping Strategies of the Poor in Rural Kenya
How do small farmers in rural Kenya attempt to meet their basic needs? What strategies do they use? Do they cope successfully? And what barriers impede them? These questions were the focus of an in-depth study of seventy-four people conducted by...
Food or Fees? Food Strategies: Farm Production
For those who have land, subsistence production of the staples (maize and beans) is the obvious and traditional strategy for food security. Few of the farmers surveyed were self-sufficient, however, largely because of low yields. An obvious strategy...
Food or Fees? Food Strategies: Farm Sales
Roseline (average, in Western) is married to a man who has been trapped in the land-fragmentation process. Her father-in-law inherited just one acre but produced six sons. There has been no formal land division, but Roseline has the use of a quarter...
Food or Fees? Food Strategies: Trading
Trading refers to the buying and selling of products, although the definition is stretched in the survey to include small-scale processing or the provision of a service such as cycle repair. The operation is essentially "petty trading" at roadsides,...
From Pharmacy to Integrative Medicine
Pharmacist Dan Wagner dispenses natural treatments to counter drug side effects, serves with volunteer agencies assisting medical institutions in underdeveloped countries, and studies, develops, and promotes medicines from the rain forests. Filling...
In the Footsteps of Lincoln: The Illinois Years - While Few Vestiges of Lincoln's Childhood Remain, Artifacts of His Life as a Young Man in Illinois Yield Insights into the Self-Educated Country Lawyer Who Became Our Sixteenth President
Resolve to be honest at all events; and if in your own judgment you cannot be an honest lawyer, resolve to be honest without being a lawyer. --Abraham Lincoln Lines were light and security tight as I checked in at the United Airlines ticket counter...
Jacob Lawrence - Stories of the Soul
Jacob Lawrence is best remembered for his epic Migration series, which catapulted him to national attention at the age of twenty-four, but a retrospective shows his continuous artistic evolution during the sixty years he explored the African-American...
Lessons of the Nineties - American Foreign Policy during the 1990s Provides Lessons for the Current Fight against Terrorism
Edward Shapiro is professor of history emeritus at Seton Hall University. He is writing a book on the Crown Heights (Brooklyn) riot of 1991. Book Info:WAR IN A TIME OF PEACE Bush, Clinton, and the Generals David Halberstam Publisher:New York: Scribner,...
Life under Islamic Rule - Persian Cultural Traditions Became an Important Part of Islamic Civilization, but Today Iran Struggles to Find Its Identity, Torn between the Desire for Democratic Progress and Adherence to the Laws of Islam
My adventure started two months before leaving Washington, D.C., when I presented my documents and photographs to the agency specializing in individual visas to Iran. The clerk looked at the two pictures and turned to me with an expression of horror....
Meeting the Challenge - George W. Bush's First Year Has Been the Tale of Two Presidencies
No U.S. president in his first year has been as coolly welcomed and then as warmly praised by the American public as George W. Bush. Bush's beginning was overshadowed by the controversial nature of his presidential victory--losing the popular vote...
New Foreign Policy Directions - like Harry Truman, George W. Bush Has Been Forced to Shoulder Tremendous Problems outside America
When George W. Bush entered the White House on January 20, 2001, he was perhaps the least exposed president to the outside world in more than 100 years. As a not quite two-term governor of an inland state, the newly inaugurated president had not traveled...
On the Road Again - Life on the Craft Circuit
Five accomplished veterans of the craft-fair circuit tell why, despite the hard work, long hours, lean times, and days on the road, it's all worth it. Each year, thousands of craftspeople crisscross America in vans and mobile homes, selling their...
President Bush's First Year
What a difference a crisis can make. The presidential candidate who received fewer popular votes than his opponent, the president who seemed more comfortable at his Texas ranch than in the White House, the chief executive whose public approval hovered...
Religion Bridger
Khalid Duran's family is a microcosm of racial, religious, ethnic, and cultural reconciliation. His father was a Muslim businessman from Morocco who worked in Germany and his mother a Roman Catholic from Spain. His wife is a black Catholic from...
Rooted in History - Elinor Sisulu Stresses the Need for Imaginative Literature for African Children
Charles R. Larson is professor of literature at American University in Washington, D.C. He is the author of The Emergence of African Fiction (1972), The Novel in the Third World (1978), American Indian Fiction (1978), Invisible Darkness: Jean Toomer...
September 11 and Our Energy Future
If the projections of surging energy demand, global warming, and fossil fuel scarcity are valid, the only solutions are conservation, solar and wind power, dams, and a major world expansion of nuclear energy. On September 11 the United States received...
September 11 and Our Energy Future - International Nuclear Energy Actions for the Future
Building up the global network of nuclear power plants required to meet future energy needs while maintaining the highest levels of safety and reliability will require a high level of international collaboration. Among a host of significant initiatives...
Speaking Swiss - Four Official but Unequal Languages
If you speak French and think you'll be able to chatter away and order brilliantly in restaurants on a visit to Switzerland, think again. During several days in the German-speaking canton (or state) of Bern, including visits to Interlaken and Grindelwald,...
The Creative Force Behind Garth - Brooks' Country Songwriters a Class Act
Country music superstar Garth Brooks owes a lot to the songwriters who penned his biggest hits. Our author met these talented wordsmiths on a musical tour of their own. It's the singer, not the song," or so the old adage goes. The singer, however,...
The Haunted - Claire Messud Explores Memory, Displacement, and Reinvention in Two New Novellas
Linda Simon is associate professor of English at Skidmore College. Book Info:THE HUNTERS Claire Messud Publisher:New York: Harcourt, 2001 181 pp., $23.00 Among any individual's transforming experiences, leaving home is one of the most traumatic:...
The Middle East Explodes
Looking beyond yasir arafat UNITED STATES--As violence threatens to engulf the Middle East, it is all too easy to lose sight of realities that Israelis and Palestinians cannot escape, no matter how much each side would like to determine its own...
The Middle East Explodes - the Recent Troubles
Early December greeted the Middle East with a series of suicide attacks carried out by members of the radical Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, killing 36. These attacks must be viewed in the proper historical context. After the September 11...
The Newsweeklies: New and 'Improved'?
Today one out of five Americans reads a newsmagazine. Most of these readers choose Time, with Newsweek running close behind and U.S. News & World Report trailing badly--though this third magazine is still a megapublication compared with other national...
The Resurgence of Vastu Shastra - India's Traditional Science of Architecture
Feng Shui has become all the rage, but India's Vastu Shastra--a similar system for designing buildings that harmonize with cosmic forces and help impart health, happiness, and prosperity to their inhabitants--is making a comeback as well. "Let us...
The Return to Big Government Is Only Temporary
In the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, Americans have begun looking upon government more favorably than at any time since the 1960s. Some observers see hints of a revival of the liberalism that flourished during that earlier era. Is...
The Secret Presidential Oath - Did Madison and Hamilton Hide Its Meaning?
The writer, who holds a doctorate in political philosophy from the Angelicum in Rome, has taught at the Catholic University of America, Marquette University, and Concordia University of Wisconsin. As a journalist Riley has written and broadcast from...
The Stem Cell Storm
Headlines blared for most of last summer on the debate about stem cell research, which was fueled by the conflict of moral versus health-care implications of destroying human embryos to obtain their stem cells. In his first nationally televised address...
The Stem Cell Storm - Does a Cell Have a Soul?
In the war over stem cell research, the outcome may finally turn on which side can best prove at what the point in the gestation process the soul joins with the cell (or cells) of the new human being. Biologically, a new person is created when a...
The Web Goes Political - How Political Candidates and Parties Are Using the Internet to Provide Information, Raise Money, Mobilize Supporters, and Get out the Vote
During the 2000 election, Web sites went from simply being Web billboards (as they were during the 1996 and '98 elections) to interactive and integrated campaign sites. The Internet helped in raising money, communicating with supporters, providing...
The Web Goes Political - the Internet and the 2001 Elections
Following the September 11 attacks, the many charities devoted to helping the families of the victims raised over $110 million online. Only one avenue of communications could have captured the overwhelming outpouring of support in such a short time:...
Which Way for the Economy? despite the Recession, the U.S. Economy Is Fundamentally Sound and Should Turn around by Early 2003
George W. Bush became president after the Supreme Court intervened in the contested Florida vote count and the American public proved willing to accept its ruling without protest. The first months of the Bush administration were not easy sailing, either...
Which Way for the Economy? Economic Update
As this edition goes to press, it was reported by a private research firm that a key gauge of U.S. economic activity had risen for a second consecutive month in November, suggesting that the worst of the economic downturn is over. The Index of Leading...
Yiddish Lives - A Language That Refuses to Die
Isaac Bashevis Singer, the only author to win a Nobel Prize in literature for stories written in Yiddish, was often asked why he wrote in a dying language. His reply: "Yiddish has been dying for a thousand years, and I'm sure it will go on dying for...
Yiddish Lives - Yiddish in Schools
Yiddish has long been used and taught in the semi-independent schools of the ultra-Orthodox. They have traditionally believed that Hebrew, the holy tongue, should be reserved for religious purposes. But in the last two decades the language has also...