The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 1, January

A Different Kind of Election - Unlike the Past, When Elections Were Determined by Personality Rather Than Policy, the Candidates Were Forced to Take Stands on Issues
On December 19, 2002, South Koreans elected a new president to lead their country for the next five years. This election was an important milestone in South Korea's political development because it cemented once and for all the tradition of a peaceful...
A Moveable Feast - A Walking Tour of Paris Reveals a City Alive with History
If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast. --Ernest Hemingway in letter to a friend. I have been coming to Paris for more than...
A Realistic U.S. Policy - the Interests of China, Japan, Russia and the United States Will Continue to Intersect on the Korean Peninsula, the Strategic Crossroads of Northeast Asia
One Korea is better than two, Koreans believe, assuming a satisfactory quality of life in unified Korea. Koreans' joy at being liberated after 35 years of brutal colonization by Imperial Japan in 1945 quickly yielded to bitter disappointment as the...
Defusing Dangers to U.S. Security
September 11 is a date that "changed America forever," or so goes conventional wisdom. In fact, the horror of that day really showed how the world had changed. The consequence was that the United States was no longer safe, secure, and insulated from...
Disguises in Nature
Conferring advantages on both predator and prey, animal camouflage is manifested in a range of ways, from colors and patterns that blend with the background to shapes and behaviors that deceive the observer. Take a walk along a country lane and...
Disguises in Nature - Human Camouflage
American artist Abbott Thayer (1849--1921), well known for his paintings of angels and nature scenes, recognized that the light colors and countershading that help camouflage aquatic birds could be similarly useful in concealing naval vessels. His...
Educating the European Way
When English is your second or third language, it's certainly not easy to take the college-admission Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT)--let alone do well on it. Yet many European students score at the highest levels in competition with their American...
Educating the European Way - Education Mosaic
In Europe, education is a mosaic of contrasts, with significant differences in length of compulsory schooling, dropout rates, and numbers of bachelor's degrees awarded. Virtually the only common thread is the depth and rigor of the curricula. Education...
Finding a Child's Secret Place - the Fiction of Katherine Paterson
J.B. Cheaney is an author who lives in the Ozarks of Missouri. Her second novel for young adults, The True Prince, was published last fall by Knopf. She last wrote for The World & I on Larry Woiwode. "We need a place," she said, "just for us....
From the Infinitesimal to the Cosmic
In a career including work on both the atomic bomb and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, Philip Morrison has shared his knowledge and love of science with teachers, students, and the general public through books, articles, and television...
From the Infinitesimal to the Cosmic - A Brilliant, Encyclopedic Mind
According to friends and colleagues, the breadth and depth of Philip Morrison's knowledge are astonishing. "He is the smartest man in the world," said one longtime friend. "He knows everything about everything." Unlike more conventional physicists,...
From This Month's Menu
A distinguishing feature of human societies is the way we generate trash. Even relatively simple communities produce significant amounts of it, so archaeologists can learn a good deal about the lives of ancient people by combing through the remains...
Hallmark of Hospitality - Tea and Ceramics in China's Jiangsu Province
A classical Chinese proverb states, "Before the flowers can bloom, the emperor must first taste of Yixing's tea." Though the emperors had many choices from the plantations across the Middle Kingdom, they displayed a special preference for the leaves...
Healing with Words and Acts on Campus
Stephen Joel Trachtenberg is president and professor of public administration at the George Washington University, Washington, D.C. This article is adapted from an address given to the Jewish Social Service Agency of Metropolitan Washington. Some...
Historic Gop Victory - It's Not the Economy, Stupid
UNITED STATES--The Republicans ran on terrorism and the Democrats ran on the economy. The Republicans won. The election results are not only a tribute to President Bush's courage in risking his reputation by campaigning hard for GOP candidates....
Hollywood Dream Palaces
Having avoided the wrecker's ball, Hollywood's magnificent film houses of the golden age have been restored to their original state, in all their opulent detail. At the turn of the century, as motion pictures made the transition from novelty entertainment...
Hollywood vs. the Internet
To the Editor: Jack Valenti, the subject of Robert Selle's profile, "Hollywood's Guardian Angel," [September 2002, p. 50], is, not to put too fine a point on it, a Luddite attempting to abolish the Internet. It is no doubt unjust to call him a "junkyard...
In Search of Monsters to Destroy - the Causes and Costs of the Bush Doctrine
Alan W. Dowd is assistant vice president at the Hudson Institute, in Indianapolis. He writes frequently for The World & I, the Washington Times, the American Legion Magazine, American Outlook, National Review Online, and other national publications....
Juan Diego's Miracle - Traditional Mexican Tales: Part Two
In December 1531, a decade after the Spanish conquest of Mexico, a poor Indian named Juan Diego was making his way to church. As he reached the Hill of Tepeyac, he began to smell a strong, aromatic fragrance. Then he heard the sounds of harps and angels...
Not Ready to Go Home Yet - an Adventurous New Englander Heads Up a Community of Volunteers Assisting the Children of Guatemala City's Garbage Dump
Her day starts at 5:30 a.m. Sandy-haired, blue-eyed, slim, and casually dressed, 32-year-old Hanley Denning looks like any other American tourist or foreign student in the colonial city of Antigua, Guatemala, as she heads for the bus. With typical...
On the Brink - Secular and Religious Forces Pull Egyptian Women
Two young women sit chatting on a bench under a tree in the courtyard of the American University in Cairo, a prestigious institution located just off busy Tahrir Square in the heart of Egypt's capital. One, Heba Sayed, 18, wears a hejab (head scarf),...
Patching Up the American Family
"Marriage scares both of us, because of the statistics," remarked Ty Murray, boyfriend of singer Jewel, when asked why he and the celebrity aren't married after four years of dating. Hollywood actress Sandra Bullock also admits her hesitancy about...
Radio Man Extraordinaire
If conservative radio talk show host Barry Farber, a firm advocate of small government, had his way in Washington, the first thing he'd do would be to launch a big, expensive new government program. He'd send every high school graduate on a two-week...
Reflections on the Bush Doctrine
Alan Dowd has an interesting article in Modern Thought on the Bush national security doctrine. Key elements of this doctrine are the concepts of preemption and preventive war. Although there are important differences between international and domestic...
Social Security and Its Discontents
John Attarian is a freelance writer who lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan and holds a Ph.D. in economics. He has contributed several book reviews and economics articles to The World & I. This essay is adapted from his book Social Security: False Consciousness...
Susan Thayer - Totally Teapots
"A teapot is a vessel for containing a message," explains Susan Thayer, a Portland, Oregon, artist who infuses a whole world of meaning and beauty into what many would consider a mundane kitchen object. "Each piece I undertake begins as an opportunity...
The City of Roads - Cultures Converge in Strasbourg
The half-timbered buildings and Gothic spires of Strasbourg rise at the confluence of an essentially French river, the Ill, with an essentially German river, the Rhine. The French city's modern name derives from the German Strass-burg, which translates...
The City of Roads - Seven Thousand Years
According to artifacts in Strasbourg's Museum of Archeology, a viable farming community existed on the site some 7,500 years ago. The city's founding probably dates to 12 b.c., when the Roman general Drusus conquered Alsace and established an encampment...
The King of Kathak - India's Birju Maharaj
o I>N one has done more to spread the uplifting message of kathak, the ancient, storytelling dance of India, than Birju Maharaj. Today, he is one of the nation's top cultural exponents. From ancient times in India, the mimes, gestures, and facial...
The Magic of Water
Possessing unique properties, water plays a key role in myriad interactions that shape and sustain the animate and inanimate worlds. ********* Editor's Note: This is the second article in our series Water and Human Destiny. The opening piece,...
The Magic of Water - Acids and Bases
An acid is commonly defined as a substance that "donates" (releases) one or more hydrogen (H+) ions, while a base is defined as a substance that "accepts" (combines with) one or more H+ ions. Interestingly enough, water can behave as an acid or a base,...
The New World of the Microlabel
s I>A classical music recording adapts to bottom-line realities and cultural marginalization, meet a nimble hatchling: MusicaOmnia. World headquarters is a small office located in a warehouse district on the outskirts of Boston. The production...
The New World of the Microlabel - Selected MusicaOmnia Recordings
J.S. Bach, Six Sonatas for Violin and Harpsichord, BWV 1014-1018 (mo 112), three CDs. Emlyn Ngai, Baroque violin, Peter Watchorn, harpsichord. This disc is one of the label's best. Emlyn Ngai uses the bow like a painter, his strokes creating texture...
Three Strikes and You're Out!
In 1995, Leandro Andrade was caught shoplifting five children's videotapes worth $84.70 from a store in California. Two weeks later, he was caught again at a different store stealing four more videotapes worth $64.84. Each offense was a misdemeanor...
Trompe L'Oeil's Enduring Allure
Trompe l'oeil, or fool-the-eye painting, has been around since antiquity, but only since the Renaissance has it become a widespread art form. Now, the most comprehensive exhibit ever on this popular genre explores its ruminations on reality, illusion,...
What Lies Ahead for Korea?
With the just-completed and frequently contentious presidential election in South Korea and the startling admission by North Korea that it has been conducting a clandestine nuclear program, Korea is once again in the headlines. What happens in this...
Words and Their Glories - Margaret Atwood's Journey from a Childhood in the Canadian Forests to the Challenges of a Prolific Author
Linda Simon is professor of English at Skidmore College and a frequent contributor to The World & I. The author of Genuine Reality: A Life of William James (Harcourt Brace, 1998), Of Virtue Rare (1982), Thornton Wilder: His World (1979) and The...