The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 6, June

A Life in Law
Griffin Bell--appointed by President Kennedy as a federal circuit court of appeals judge and by President Carter as U.S. attorney general--was one of a handful of jurists who implemented racial desegregation in the United States, a record of which...
America's Power Needs - Electrical Consumers Demand an Adequate Supply, Reasonable Price, and Minimal Government Role in Meeting Their Energy Requirements
Thomas Edison, inventor, scientist, and businessman, completed the Pearl Street power station in New York City in 1881. This event sparked the creation of an entire new industry. Over the 12 decades since, the U.S. power sector has been one of the...
America's Power Needs - How the Grid Powers a Continent
The Grid is the giant network of high-voltage power transmission wires- -those big ones up on those tall construction-set towers--that covers the entire United States and much of Canada. These wires are all interconnected at hundreds of substations,...
America's Power Needs - Power around the World
Coal provides about one-third of the world's electricity. Natural gas provides about 20 percent; renewable energy (primarily hydroelectric) about 22 percent. A little more than 14 percent comes from nuclear energy, and less than 9 percent is generated...
Ancient Khan Al-Khalili - Cairo's Historic Market
Cairo's great market, Khan al-Khalili, was the last stop before the caravans headed out into the deserts of Sinai. It was the most important place to stock up on the food, water, and trade goods that travelers would need for journeys to Jerusalem,...
An Early Look at the American Dream - Historic Harpers Ferry
Although best known today as the site of abolitionaist John Brown's raid in 1859, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, was once a booming transit, commercial, and industrial center where anything seemed possible. When Robert Harper arrived at the confluence...
Barnacle Bonanza
Whether gripping rocky shorelines, cleaving to floating objects, penetrating ocean depths, or parasitizing other sea creatures, these crustaceans have colonized nearly every type of marine environment. Stroll along practically any rocky shoreline,...
Breaking the Cycle of Family Dissolution - against the Greatest Odds
Robert L. Woodson Sr. is the founder and president of the National Center for Neighborhood Enterprise and author of The Triumph of Joseph: How Today's Healers Are Reviving Our Streets and Neighborhoods (1998). America is experiencing an epidemic...
Bush V. Gore - A Case in Conservative Judicial Activism?
Gerard V. Bradley is professor of law at the University of Notre Dame Law School. I write these paragraphs having just put down the "paper of record," today's edition of the New York Times. The Times was second to none in its support of Al Gore...
Can Scientists Be Trusted on Policy Questions?
If I didn't believe that some scientists could be trusted on policy questions, I would not permit so many to write essays on policy questions for The World & I. In January Kenneth Green wrote an article on global warming that viewed warming as...
China and America Square off - Managing the Incident
UNITED STATES--The aftermath of the midair collision of an American spy plane and a Chinese jet fighter is following a tired but dangerous cold-war script that is in neither countryOs interest. Common sense suggests that a decade after the end of the...
China's Window on the World
Departing from the local genre's traditional image, a Hong Kong theater festival reveals a surprisingly eclectic mix of Eastern and Western influences, the immense variety of which was not lost on our well- traveled author. By mistake, on the last...
Educating Our Children - the Home-School Connection
Patrica L. Fry, a frequent contributor, is a publisher and writer who lives in California. One might wonder these days, upon visiting an American public school, about all those extra people. They're in classrooms and school offices. They're standing...
Ensuring an Adequate Power Supply - Five Courses of Action Will Ensure an Adequate and Reasonably Priced Supply of Electric Power
Let's be accurate. Wholesale and retail electricity markets are not new. It is the full or partial deregulation of these markets that is new. During the last five to six years, we have experimented with the deregulation of these markets. Not one deregulation...
Ethiopia: What Can Be Done?
The Ethiopian famine has swallowed many lives in the last two decades. Though Ethiopia is not the only country in the Horn of Africa to have endured natural and man-made famine in recent years, it was Ethiopia's famine during the 1980s that caused...
Facing Global Warming
Given the mounting evidence supporting the view that the "fingerprints" of human activities are becoming visible amid the noisy climate data, should we care, or can we do anything about it? The 1990s were the warmest decade in a thousand years....
Hard Times at CNN
It was the print equivalent of having a cranky Mike Wallace and his 60 Minutes video crew show up unannounced at your front door, bright and early on a Sunday morning. April's cover story of Brill's Content, the nation's best monthly magazine devoted...
Immortalizing the Ephemeral - the Photojournalism of Weegee
The work of Usher Fellig--known as Weegee--epitomizes the hard-boiled newspaper photojournalism that thrived from the thirties through the fifties in America, creating a distinct brand of voyeurism for the masses. I have forgotten (if I ever knew)...
MaryLou Higgins - Crafting the Past
"I've always done artwork," MaryLou Higgins enthusiastically remarks in a telephone interview from her Pittsboro, North Carolina, studio. "For the last twenty-five years I've done ceramic work; before that, I did welded-steel sculpture, painting, and...
Meandering Down the Mosel - Germany's Mosel River Valley Offers Roman Ruins, Medieval Castles, and Renowned Wines along a Scenic Highway Route That Attracts Travelers from All over the World
A stroke of good luck first brought me to Germany's Mosel River region several years ago. My husband and I both had jobs that sent us to the far western part of Germany, where we needed to find a place to live for two or three months. But short-term...
Moms' Privacy Trumps Infants' Health
While recognizing the epidemic of cocaine use among pregnant women and the scourge brought upon their unborn children, a divided Supreme Court nonetheless held there was no "special need" justifying the "use of handcuffs, arrests, prosecutions, and...
Motorcycle Symbolism
The motorcycle is the most prized possession and obvious status symbol in contemporary urban Vietnam. To most Western eyes, the 100-cc bikes that people in Hanoi travel on are scooters. They would be considered only cute toys compared to the motorbikes...
New Millennium Gleaners - Volunteers for the Society of St. Andrew Salvage Nutritious Produce from Fields and Orchards to Distribute to Hungry People across the United States
From Maine to Mississippi, Florida to South Dakota, and onward to every state in this broad country, you'll see them--small armies of volunteer gleaners harvesting tons of donated surplus potatoes and other farm produce like tomatoes, cucumbers, yellow...
Population Control Today-And Tomorrow?
The success of the population control movement over the past four decades has been nothing less than astonishing. Places like Bangladesh and Kenya are awash in condoms (even though basic medicines are scarce), and population is actually falling in...
Population Control Today-And Tomorrow? Saint Margaret Sanger
Margaret Sanger, who founded the Planned Parenthood Federation of America in 1942, is often viewed as the patron saint of the modern population control movement. Her critics, citing numerous references in her writings, denounce her as a white supremacist,...
Strength Lies in Quiet Work - Forging Coalitions and Change in the Philippines
Ferdinand Marcos was elected president of the Philippines in 1965. In 1972, in the face of opposition from many sectors, Marcos declared martial law. This remained in force until he lifted it in 1981. Then, in the world-renowned "People Power" presidential...
The Atomic Physics Maestro
Born 130 years ago in rural New Zealand, Ernest Rutherford unraveled the mysteries of radioactivity, determined the structure of the atom, split the atom, and led research labs on two continents. "It is given to but few men to achieve immortality,...
The Hard Idea of Truth - A Profile of A.S. Byatt
Linda Simon is professor of English at Skidmore College. The author of Genuine Reality: A Life of William James (Harcourt Brace, 1998), Of Virtue Rare (1982), Thornton Wilder, His World (1979), and The Biography of Alice B. Toklas (1977), she edited...
The National Energy Crisis
As an economic superpower, America requires enormous amounts of energy to keep going. Each year it consumes about 25 percent of the world's primary energy (petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electric power). Our need for electricity in a computer age...
The Treasures of Oman - with the Help of a Visionary Sultan the Doors of Tourism Are Slowly Opening in Oman, but Leave Your Bikinis at Home
Dismounting from a camel can be a disconcerting experience for the novice. There are three stages. You are, first of all, flung forward alarmingly as the animal kneels down, then hurled backward as it comes to rest on its haunches. As you regain your...
The Zero-Year Curse - Might Tragedy Befall the President?
On February 7, a former IRS agent was found just outside the fence on the southwestern side of the White House, brandishing a handgun. It was reported that several wild shots were fired before Secret Service officers disabled the man by shooting him...
Traditions and Transition - Rural Women in Slovakia
On October 15, 1997, Beth Yenchko and I were driving over the twisting mountain roads of the White Carpathians toward northern Slovakia, which borders Poland and the Czech Republic. We were heading for Horna (Upper) Marikova for the first Slovakian...
Video Gems
Amid the hype for Hollywood's latest video releases, here are six prizewinning international films you may have overlooked at your neighborhood video store. Hollywood and the nationally known retail outlets make sure that the public knows when films...
Why the Bush V.gore Decision Was Correct
Morton A. Kaplan is Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science Emeritus at the University of Chicago, editor and publisher of The World & I, and author of Law in a Democratic Society. The dispute over the Bush v. Gore decision is important...
Will California Learn from Pennsylvania and Texas? by Building New Power Plants and Maintaining an Energy Surplus, Pennsylvania and Texas Provide an Important Lesson for Citizens of the Golden State
Today, in parts of the old Soviet Union, electricity is sure to be available for only a limited number of hours each day. Given their history of central planning and commitment to more "precious" resources like ICBMs and tanks, it is not surprising...