The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 3, March

A Changing Economy : Central America Continues to Produce Coffee and Bananas, but Computer Chips and Textiles Are Becoming More Important
With coasts on the Caribbean and the Pacific, a large number of well- educated people, cheap labor, and vast areas of unspoiled wilderness, Central America has a huge potential. Occupying an area about the size of Arizona and Utah combined, Central...
A Different Path for Costa Rica
Central America includes an oddity: Costa Rica's long tradition of democracy, peace, and the rule of law. Unlike its neighbors, it did not face dictatorships, military regimes, or civil wars. From its formation as an independent republic, its rulers...
A Founder of Greenpeace
In 1971, a dozen young men made history by sailing a leaky halibut boat called the Phyllis Cormack to Alaska's Amchitka Island to try to butt in on a U.S. hydrogen-bomb test. They weren't able to stop the explosion, but their presence on the high seas...
America's Sweeteners Today : Discovered by Native Americans, Maple Syrup and Its Sugar Are Authentic North American Sweeteners Benefiting from Modern Technology
Here in New England, spring may come on a February day, when the snow scintillates and the sun soars confidently into the azure sky. When it does, my neighbors tap the maple trees in their yards, because the sap runs most abundantly in the brilliant...
Among the Uighurs : Muslim Minority of West China
On a typical Friday afternoon last summer, the streets of Kashgar, a city in China's massive western province of Xinjiang, were packed. People wandered happily through the alleys and roads, celebrating the beginning of the weekend. Most were Uighurs...
Among the Uighurs : Uighur History
The Uighurs have lived in Xinjiang for over two millennia. As early as 206 b.c., Chinese primary accounts mention the Uighurs, who had their own kingdom of Eastern Turkestan several times during the various Chinese dynasties. During some of these periods,...
Among the Uighurs : Uighurs under Communism
From the early days of communist rule, Beijing attempted to undercut the Uighurs' authority over Xinjiang's society, culture, and economy to prevent any repeats of the uprisings of 1933 and 1944. The central government launched aggressive resettlement...
Between Hard and Soft : The Dilemma of the Guambianos
In the Andes' central cordillera, in a southwestern corner of Colombia, live some seventeen thousand Guambiano Indians. Since the Spanish conquest they have been gradually pushed out of the best parts of their original land. Today they eke out a difficult...
Biodiversity in Borneo : Sabah and Sarawak Captivate Intrepid Visitors with Their Amazing Biodiversity and Ancient Caves
Each outing in Borneo yields unexpected results. Ancient caves may be filled with millions of bats, paintings from another era, or a pool of water said to be a fountain of youth. There, blowguns are used for hunting wild boars, and log drums are struck...
Blame It on the Snake
J.B. Cheaney is an author who lives in the Ozarks of Missouri. Her second novel for young adults, The True Prince, was published last fall by Knopf. She last wrote for The World & I on Katherine Paterson. Though the Cleves loved to recount among...
Brad Sells
The Flow of Life "I want to preserve the soul of the tree," says Brad Sells, who works wonders in wood at the Bark Studio in Cookeville, Tennessee. "I start with a hydraulic chainsaw and a spontaneous creative spirit, and much like jazz improvisation,...
Branch Rickey and Jackie Robinson : Precursors to the Civil Rights Movement
Ira Glasser was the national executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union for nearly a quarter century until his retirement in 2001. We were told as children that World War II was a war fought against racism, against the idea that a...
Central America Today
Twenty years ago, the American news media were filled with stories about Sandinistas and Contras in Nicaragua, the civil war in El Salvador, and the military government of Guatemala. Today these three countries have put those fratricidal days behind...
Eden Forged at Gunpoint : African Animals on Asia's Calauit Island
At the peak of Ferdinand Marcos' rule of the Philippines, a civil war was raging half a world away in Kenya. As the conflict wore on, game officials from the Shimba Hills National Reserve reportedly became fearful that much of its wildlife would be...
El Salvador: The Bellwether?
Apart from Nicaragua, which achieved name recognition during Ollie North's Iran-Contra ordeal, no Central American country stirs so much passion in the U.S. Left-Right divide as El Salvador. The "low intensity" strategy to combat guerrillas led to...
Enhancing Our Technological Literacy
To make informed decisions in our increasingly technological society, we need to familiarize ourselves with various forms of technology, including their pros and cons, and how they affect our lives. ******** Condensed and adapted with permission...
From Repression to Reconciliation
The Central American experience shows that democracy and peace are possible. The countries of Central America have historically been vulnerable to foreign intervention, social inequality, and a culture of violence and repression. Military rulers,...
From This Month's Menu
By the time you read this, the United States may be irrevocably committed to war with Iraq. While war is always filled with uncertainties, this should be a conflict in which the United States prevails relatively quickly. However, after the war comes...
Getting Serious about Laughter
Therapeutic Laughter "How can you measure the benefits of a weekly laughter session for a resident who can barely speak or move?" asks Jacki Kwan, psychotherapist, humor consultant, and laughter therapist. With her purple hat, yellow sneakers, and...
In the Key of Freedom : The Achievement of Imre KertAsz
Lee Congdon writes regularly on modern literature and Hungarian culture. He is professor of history at James Madison University. It came as no surprise to those who still care about serious writing that the 2001 Nobel Prize in literature went to...
It Is Time to Get Involved
Imagine it is January 2006. A 68-year-old widow on Medicare is living alone and has just learned that a new drug has been approved--a pill to ward off Alzheimer's disease. The drug will not be cheap, but taking it could mean the difference between...
It Is Time to Get Involved : The PDS Plan
The Prescription Drug Security (PDS) plan is a new proposal that offers an up-front subsidy for routine drug expenses; coverage for high-end and catastrophic drug costs; and access to competitive discounts on prescription drugs. The plan would provide...
Midcentury Organics : Vital Forms in Postwar Art and Design
A touring exhibition explores how, reacting against the idealizing of the machine between the world wars, many postwar artists and designers turned to natural forms for inspiration for everything from sculpture and painting to furniture and tableware....
Mirror to Change : Istanbul's Kapali Carsi
Murat Bilir, 53, urbanely handsome in an impeccable shirt and tie and a pair of well-pressed blue jeans, relaxes behind his walnut desk listening to classical music. His office is crammed into a corner of his diminutive shop in the old bedestan (central...
Mirror to Change : Metaphor for a City
The very name Istanbul conjures up diverse images that take on the power of metaphor. Those who know the city think of the waters of the Bosporus, the traffic of tugboats and freighters; the city's docks, piled high with brightly hued containers and...
North Korean Flash Point
Calling north korea UNITED STATES--The Bush administration belatedly but smartly reversed direction on North Korea by offering to begin direct talks with Pyongyang about its nuclear weapons programs. A quick and verifiable end to the North's nuclear...
Not So Black-and-White a Question
When Barbara Grutter received a letter from the University of Michigan Law School denying her admission, the thought of Abraham Lincoln or the Civil War probably never entered her mind. But the bad news was a lingering legacy of the war; her denial...
Our Thirst for Water
Given our dependence on water to sustain our lives and culture, we need to preserve and protect this precious resource before our taps run dry. When we consider the vast oceans, measureless clouds, mighty rivers, majestic lakes, and polar ice masses,...
'Peace Has No Finishing Line'
The most notable advocate for peace and democratization in Central America remains Oscar Arias, president of Costa Rica from 1986 until 1990. Following is an excerpt from his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech on December 10, 1987. When you chose...
Quick Fixes Are Toxins
After three years of unsuccessful attempts to enact various unaffordable and unworkable versions of a Medicare prescription drug benefit, Congress is back at work again. Substantial political momentum remains behind the drive to "do something" to make...
Spirit TV : The Small Screen Takes on Eternity
No longer a "vast wasteland," television has become a window on a spiritual realm. It's been nearly five decades since Federal Communications Commission Chairman Newton Minow labeled all of television a "vast wasteland." Television's many critics...
The Challenges of Democratization : Since the Early 1990s, Central America Has Celebrated Free and Fair Elections, with Power Transferrring Peacefully from One Democratically Elected Government to Another
The resolution to the Central American wars of the late seventies and eighties was signaled in 1987 with the Arias Peace Plan, which opened the door for negotiations between governments and rebel forces to terminate the conflicts that had lasted over...
The Colossus of the North : It Is in U.S. Political and Economic Interests for Central America to Be Stable and Prosperous, as This Would Promote Investment There and Make Terrorism, Drugs, and Immigration More Manageable
Central America has lain largely unnoticed in the shadows of its larger neighbors, the United States and Mexico. Several countries briefly assumed strategic importance and thus gained attention from Washington during the last decades of the Cold War....
The Equality State : Women's Rights on the Western Frontier
The twentieth century heralded in the atomic age and the era of space exploration. Incredibly though, in the first part of that century, civilized countries around the world, including the United States (whose sovereignty was premised on equality for...
The Jackie Robinson Story
Modern Thought has a story in this issue about how Branch Rickey of the old Brooklyn Dodgers integrated baseball when he brought Jackie Robinson onto the team. This occurred just after World War II while, as a returned veteran, I was in the first year...
Tribute to a Great High King : One Thousand Years Have Passed since Brian Boru Was Crowned High King of Ireland, Yet His Spirit Lives on in the Ancient Castles and Legendary Landscapes of His Native County Clare
Conor Myles John O'Brien, eighteenth baron of Inchiquin, prince of Thomond, and tenth baronet of Lemeneagh, was catching his breath, he said, when we met at Thomond House, his home on the grounds of Dromoland Castle. The previous week, August 19--22,...
Undone by Diversity Bias
In August 2002, the Philadelphia Daily News ran a cover story about the number of fugitives who were wanted on murder charges. There were 41 blacks, 12 Hispanics, and 3 Asians with warrants out on them. No whites in Philadelphia were being sought at...
Western Theater's European Roots
Although Greece and Rome are thought to be the progenitors of Western theater, one must not lose sight of the valuable contributions of the traditional storytellers and performers of eastern Europe. Among the fragmentary records of human civilization...
Why Eminem Is a Problem
Lloyd Eby is assistant senior editor in the Currents in Modern Thought section of The World & I. He has published many articles on film, culture, and other subjects. The best discussion I have seen of the role and influence of music in the lives...
Why Eminem Is Important
M.P. McCrillis is a lecturer in English at the University College of Cape Breton in Nova Scotia. With the recent release of his new album, The Eminem Show, rapper Marshall Mathers III, better known as Eminem, has catapulted to the forefront of popular...