The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 7, July

A Clash of Civilizations or the Emergence of Civilization?
In a world in which the horrendous actions of religious extremists have made so many headlines, the issue of a clash of civilizations, which Current Issues is exploring this month, requires attention. On the other hand, the importance of religion to...
A Museum for Spies - Spycraft Comes Alive in Washington, D.C.'S New Privately Owned, State-of-the-Art International Spy Museum
Spy. The very sibilant sound of the word says "sinister." Yet, as my daughter graphically pointed out in her "good spy balloon" and "bad spy balloon," drawings created when she was eight years of age, spies can be both bad and good. Whether they are...
Below Paradise - the Marvel of China's Grand Canal
From a modern bridge in a newer part of Suzhou, I looked down over the world's most ancient man-made waterway, China's Grand Canal. Single cargo barges, loaded with coal, bagged rice, and giant logs, ran low in the water. Other barges plowed along,...
Budget Magic Tricks
Magicians use sleight of hand to convince us that the impossible has occurred before our eyes. Politicians aim to be budget magicians, using tricks to convince voters that government is fiscally prudent while at the same time spending continues unabated...
Celestial Leonardo
The first comprehensive American exhibition of Leonardo da Vinci's drawings explores the creative process of the unschooled genius who was an artist, scientist, inventor, theorist, and teacher. He was considered a genius even in his own time. A...
Conflict Unending? Jews, Christians, Muslims, and People of All Faiths Have to Go beyond Ritualistic Adherence to Their Doctrine and Subject Their Faith to the Scrutiny of Rational Thought until They Discover the Ultimate Basis of Righteous Law and Authority
It is ironic that as we enter the sanctuaries of our faiths to worship the Supreme Being, we frequently leave the ideals of peace and justice for all, unity of humankind, and the golden principles of civilized moral conduct at the doorsteps and worship...
Dancing a New Language
French-Canadian ballerina Dominique Dumais looks beyond her craft for a new dance language. A classically trained artist, she continues to create exciting new possibilities in the dance world. Women ballet choreographers are rare creatures. In a...
Exporting Civil Society
Alan W. Dowd is assistant vice president at the Hudson Institute in Indianapolis. His article "In Search of Monsters to Destroy: The Causes and Costs of the Bush Doctrine" appeared in the January 2003 issue of The World & I. "We have it in...
Fat City Aromas
One might wonder how the perfume capital of the world came to be named Grasse, which means "fat" or "fatty." No one knows for sure. Of the possibilities that I've heard suggested, my favorite is that it is named after the key feature of enfleurage,...
Florence Nightingale - Fantasy and Fact
Michael Timko is professor emeritus at the City University of New York. His article "Margaret Fuller: Forgotten American Hero" appeared in the November 2000 issue of The World & I While most of the major nineteenth-century European figures...
Fritz Hirschberger - the Eye of the Holocaust
"If you want to be an artist, you have to be possessed," says San Francisco--based artist Fritz Hirschberger. Now in his ninth decade, he maintains the uncompromising beliefs that have marked his life's odyssey through a turbulent era. Hirschberger...
From Simple Spouts to Gushing Grandeur
Attesting to the art and spirit of human ingenuity, the history of fountain design has involved a series of innovations in our methods of controlling the flow of water. During your next lunch break or quiet evening walk, relax near a playful fountain...
From This Month's Menu
Could the ideological struggles of the Cold War be replaced by a new conflict between the cultures rooted in Christianity and Islam? That is the question examined in this month's Special Report, The Cross and Crescent in Today's World. The question...
Future Water Availability in South Africa
Through radically restructuring rights and allocations, Africa's southernmost country aims to provide safe drinking water for all its citizens while meeting all other legitimate needs for the precious liquid. With roughly one-fourth of its citizens...
Future Water Availability in the U.S
With most supplies already fully exploited or even overexploited in the case of many underground sources, the task of meeting all of the country's future needs requires greatly improved management of both resources and uses through a holistic systems...
Good Luck Weeds
Whether one considers them sacred or mundane, clovers are valuable as food for livestock, sources of herbal remedies, and agents for soil conservation and enrichment. In ancient times, clovers were thought to possess supernatural powers. There seemed...
How Stands Afghanistan Now?
The events of 9/11 gave new hope to the people of Afghanistan. During the 1980s they had suffered from the Soviet occupation--a million dead, millions more injured or refugees, their country devastated and choked with land mines. Then, in the 1990s,...
How the Iraq War Was Seen Overseas
When U.S. tanks and troops rolled into Iraq and American warplanes pummeled Baghdad, readers and viewers around the world were bombarded with round-the-clock stories and images from the front lines of the world's latest war. Conflict may be the only...
Humanitarian Swami
Ravi Shankar (the Hindu holy man, not the sitar player) gains intense joy from religious quietude. But he has also launched dynamic humanitarian outreach projects to help, for example, in the shell- shocked post--September 11 environment in New York...
Japan's Samurai Castles - of the Thousands of Wooden Castles That Stood Guard over Medieval Japan, Three of the Dozen That Remain Helped Shape the Modern Cities That Grew Up around Them
The first foreigner to tour a Japanese castle was nearly as astonished as I was. In 1580, Luis Frois, a Jesuit priest, visited Azuchi Castle in the company of its lord. Afterward, Frois wrote in a letter: "As regards architecture, strength, wealth,...
'Lynching Stephen King'
M.P. McCrillis is lecturer in English at the University College of Cape Breton in Nova Scotia. His article "Why Eminem Is Important" appeared in the March 2003 issue of The World & I. David Lynch can teach us more about horror than Stephen King...
Master of the Apocalyptic Stage - Josef Szajna at 80
Having survived the Nazis and the communists, Polish playwright J-sef Szajna has created an intense body of work that recalls his experiences in raw and dangerous terms. J-sef Szajna was born in 1922 in Rzeszow, a town in southern Poland on the...
Socialist Paradise Lost - beneath an Iron Fist
On March 18, the repressive character of Castro's regime was in full evidence. Reports surfaced that as many as ninety so-called dissidents had been arrested. The news barely attracted attention in the U.S. media. On April, 17 the UN Human Rights Commission,...
Socialist Paradise Lost - Cuba's Failing 'Special Period in a Time of Peace'
Evening falls softly upon Havana. Mar'a del Angel leans against the balustrade of the third-floor balcony of her apartment building. She points out the Havana Libre Hotel, a glistening glass and steel high- rise some blocks away. That is where she...
Socialist Paradise Lost - Finding Something to Wear
Pristine white robes flutter against the amber skin of Afro-Cuban women. Sparkling spandex packs generous curves, and satin prom dresses embellish Havana's diminutive princesses. Cubans obviously don't worship at the church of brand-name recognition....
Sufism - the Path of Love
Susha Guppy, a London resident, is the London editor of Paris Review and a contributor to various publications on both sides of the Atlantic. Her review of Jihad: The Trail of Political Islam appeared in the November 2002 issue of The World & I....
The Baltimore and Ohio - My Train, My Home
Lee Edwards is a Distinguished Fellow in Conservative Thought at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. I loved the B&0 as a child, although my father was not a railroad man and I did not live in Baltimore. I loved it because every summer...
The Baltimore and Ohio - Railroad Firsts
Among the B&O's claims to fame are its many firsts in U.S. history. It was the first railroad company to use iron wheels that revolved with the axles (1829), to operate a railroad depot, Mount Clare, in Baltimore (1833), and to carry a U.S. president....
The Baltimore and Ohio - the 175th Anniversary of America's First Railroad
Eleven years after the British had been turned back at Fort McHenry and Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the "Star-Spangled Banner," the city of Baltimore considered itself under economic siege. The largest U.S. city, after New York and Philadelphia,...
The Clash of Civilizations? Islamic Totalitarianism Constitutes an Ideological Threat, as Marxism-Leninism Did during the Cold War
Though he had a long and influential career before and has modified his views since, Samuel Huntington remains irrevocably associated with the concept of the clash of civilizations. He employed it in a 1993 article in Foreign Affairs and a subsequent...
The Cross and Crescent in Today's World
In this month's Special Report we examine whether Judeo-Christianity and Islam are mortal enemies or merely long-lost brothers who need to lay down their swords and recognize their similarities rather than their differences. The first article, "The...
The Electrifying Les Paul
The sound of popular music as we know it today--with multitrack recordings, reverb, and electric guitars--is largely the creation of Les Paul, who made all these innovations to perfect his unique brand of music. Les Paul could, with some justification,...
The Plain of Jars - Exploring the Northwestern Lobe of Laos and One the World's Most Interesting Archaeological Sites by Jeep Is a Surprise- Filled Undertaking
Few people are aware of this, but it's possible to drive to some of the remotest places in Southeast Asia almost as easily as driving to your neighborhood mall. Well, maybe not quite that easily, because rarely does crossing a raging river in the middle...
The Scented Spring - France's Perfume Capital for the World
For centuries, the beautiful French city of Grasse on the C(tm)te d'Azur has produced perfumes and powders. Located in the foothills of the Alps, Grasse enjoys fertile soil and a sunny and temperate microclimate, even compared with that of Cannes,...
The Specter of Sars
Sars nations learn a lesson UNITED STATES--The flood of dismal news about how the spread of SARS is causing medical, economic and political woes in China failed to drown out one promising development: Several nations appear to have a handle on their...
The 'Terror' in Cross Burning
That cross burning is highly repugnant, invoking extreme intimidation and fear to millions of Americans, the Supreme Court is in full agreement. But the unanimity between the nine justices ended there in a case testing the constitutionality of Virginia's...
Trespassing in Matta's Land - Conservation Efforts Stumble in Ivory Coast
On a hot, dry morning in late October I left Nassian, a small town in the Ivory Coast, to drive to the even smaller village of Depingo. My destination was located on the border of the biggest national park in West Africa. It was my goal to learn about...