The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 4, April

A 'Damming' Experience in the Senate
John Gizzi reports on Congress for Human Events in Washington, D.C. Politicians and pundits complain that the Senate is a bottleneck. Could it be that the Founding Fathers designed it that way? "And to ensure that the Senate could protect the...
A Great City Awakes: Beijing Is Changing Forever
Steven Knipp is a freelance writer. Two centuries ago, Napoleon Bonaparte declared, "When China awakes, the world will tremble." Today, his forecast is finally beginning to come true. The Chinese capital now literally trembles with the roar of traffic...
A Hands-On Approach to Latin America
Stephen Johnson is senior policy analyst for Latin America at the Heritage Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank. Gradually the Bush administration has been getting its act together on U.S. policy toward Latin America. Last year, it concluded...
Argentina: South America's Crown Jewel
Laura Byrd is a freelance writer and photographer based in San Diego. She would like to thank the Four Season Hotel Buenos Aires, American Airlines, and Intelstar Marketing and Public Relations for their assistance in the preparation of this article....
Buffalo Returns to American Plates
Helen Studley, cookbook author, food and travel writer, and co-owner of the former New York City restaurant La Colombe d'Or, stalks food wherever she goes. She is a member of Les Dames d'Escoffier and the American Society of Journalists and Authors....
Building a Better Moth Trap
Joel Grossman is a freelance science writer residing in Santa Monica, California. A little-known theory that insects use their antennae to perceive electromagnetic signals from sexual scents provides the conceptual framework for a new tool to combat...
China's Psyche
Holly Krambeck currently resides in Beijing, where she works as an editor for China Today. It is said that during the Ming (1368--1644) and part of the Qing dynasties, China was the most socially, culturally, and technologically advanced nation...
Chronicler of an Era: The Photography of Julia Margaret Cameron
Herb Greer is a contributing editor to the Arts section of The World & I. Photographer Julia Margaret Cameron won the praise of the British artistic and intellectual elite through her classic, nineteenth-century iconographic images of the great...
Dr. Khan's Nuclear Confession
Confessional statement PAKISTAN--The official reaction from the U.S. has by and large been measured though equally nuanced. This is understandable because despite its well-known proliferation concerns, the Bush administration badly needs Pakistan's...
Father Theodore Hesburgh: Priest, Peacemaker, Educator
Robert R. Selle is an editor in the Current Issues section of The World & I. Growing up in Syracuse, New York, young Theodore Hesburgh played baseball and football, built tree houses, fished at the local fishing holes, camped with his family,...
From the Black Sea to Budapest: Traveling the Eastern Danube
Award-winning photojournalist Dave Bartruff, a World & I contributor since 1987, wishes to thank Grand Circle Travel for its generous assistance in the preparation of this essay. "Buna Dimineata! Good morning! Did you sleep well?" inquired the...
Harvest of Sorrow: The Business of Unexploded Bombs
William Pentland is a law clerk and writer who lives in San Francisco. Railroad tracks shadow the river Praca as it snakes through the canyons of Bosnia's Sudici region. Unused footpaths, left by grazing livestock and wild animals, wander from the...
Introduction: Does American Democracy Fall Short?
Since the horrific events of September 11, 2001, the United States has been hunting down terrorists, first in Afghanistan and then in Iraq. That effort is being followed by an attempt to bring democracy to both countries. In this month's Special Report,...
Masako Van Leijenhorst: Peace and Vibrance
"I do not paint an exact likeness of nature, but intend to bring out the essence and 'feel' of nature in my painting," says artist Masako van Leijenhorst. Born in Osaka in 1940, van Leijenhorst has had an interesting and varied life, residing in...
May a Good Year Be Sealed: Tensions Disturb the Paris Jewish Community
Ben Barber is a journalist and former foreign correspondent, who has written for The World & I since 1990. Crossing a stone bridge over the Seine River, the last thing I expected to see was the police. But before entering the ancient Marais...
Offering Hope to the Emotionally Depressed
Norbert R. Myslinski is associate professor of neuroscience at the University of Maryland. He is also director of the International Brain Bee and Maryland Brain Awareness Week. Based on advances in our understanding of the brain and its response...
One Nation Indivisible
The Special Report in Current Issues this month considers some of the failures of American democracy. As one who loves the moral principles that this country stands for, I want the nation to be the best that it can be. Yes, we have often fallen short,...
Recent Health Scare
Kava has recently come under serious scrutiny. Since the late 1980s, use of kava-based products and remedies has been suspected as a possible cause in certain cases of liver damage and even in liver-related deaths. In Europe and the United States,...
Slaying the Gerrymander
Patrick Basham is senior fellow at the Center for Representative Government at the Cato Institute in Washington, D.C. Politically motivated reapportionment has been an American institution for almost 200 years. It is time to examine how it is done...
The American Foreign Policy Tradition: Inspiration for Troubled Times
Anne R. Pierce is the author of Woodrow Wilson and Harry Truman: Mission and Power in American Foreign Policy (Praeger, 2003). No one doubts anymore that foreign policy is of paramount importance or that it must be wisely crafted if we are to defend...
The Courts: End Run around the People
Jack Wade Nowlin is Jessie D. Puckett Jr. Lecturer in Law and assistant professor of law at the University of Mississippi Law School. His most recent article, "The Judicial Restraint Amendment: Populist Constitutional Reform in the Spirit of the Bill...
The Rockies by Rail
Charles O. Cecil is devoting himself to writing and photography after a career in the Foreign Service. He can be reached at cecilimages@comcast.net The Canadian Rockies are filled with breathtaking scenery and recreational activities that are best...
The Sacred Root: Drinking Kava on Vanuatu
Anders Ryman is a freelance photojournalist and anthropologist based in Sweden. It is late afternoon. A warm light finds its way into the imwayim, a meeting place cut out of the dense forest and shaded by magnificent banyan trees. Men and boys are...
The World Trade Center Memorial Competition
Susan Tenaglia, currently based in Guyer, Connecticut, is an arts writer, critic, and historian. Winning out over fifty-two hundred entries, New York City architect Michael Arad and Peter Walker's bold design for the World Trade Center memorial,...
Three Clever Fish: Swahili Fables: Part Two
Jan Knappert spent four years collecting fables and epic tales in the towns of the Swahili people, such as Lamu, Pate, Malindi, Mombasa, Dar es Salaam, and others. He holds a doctorate in Swahili poetry, history, and culture and has taught at nine...
'To Write Myself into Being': A Profile of Hilary Mantel
Linda Simon is professor of literature at Skidmore College and a frequent contributor to The World & I. In her native England, Hilary Mantel is as acclaimed a writer as, for example, Margaret Atwood is on this side of the Atlantic, and for similar...
Turner's Venice
Scarlet Cheng, based in Los Angeles, is a contributing editor to the Arts section of The World & I. The first exhibition ever devoted to J.M.W. Turner's memorable evocations of Venice shows the artist going through a revolution in painting,...
Turning a New 'Paige'
Craig Lancto is education editor at The World & I. For years and years, discussions of public school monopolies and school choice have been associated with such so-called radical organizations as the Alliance for Separation of School and State....
Twitching Transformers
Alfredo Vazquez Carazo is the chief technology officer for Face Electronics in Norfolk, Virginia. A stack of small, vibrating ceramic disks will soon begin to take over the core task of stepping voltage up or down in portable electronics, such as...
Unions and the Economy
Marvin Kosters is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. He has written extensively on labor market issues and on the effects of federal government policies. In America, not too long ago, large, powerful unions could shut down...
Window on the Modern World: Shaw Festival Stresses Freshness, Change
Michael Marshall, formerly executive editor of The World & I, is currently editor in chief of United Press International. Beginning its forty-third season with second-year artistic director Jackie Maxwell at the helm, Ontario's remarkable Shaw...