The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 5, May

An American Chameleon Colors Expectations
Capable of transforming its coat from green to brown and variations in between, the green anole is an arboreal lizard that's intriguing to observe. A winsome little fellow it is. Often you may find it quite by accident, in quiet repose on a chocolate-hued...
An Art More Noble: Falconry Persists in Middle America
From her perch five feet above an earthen mound, the predator scans the tall grass. Her steady gaze searches for the slightest sign of motion. Crows and pigeons have already fled the field, instinctively terrified by the sight of the Harris' hawk....
Ancient Knowing: Folklore of the Scottish Highlands
History, says a Highlander, is something that breathes upon you every day. For residents of the mountainous territory of central and northern Scotland, history is something one almost inhales from the glens and battlefields, sacred wells, mystical...
An East-West Physicist
Through 50 years at the cutting edge of efforts to understand the smallest fragments of matter, Nobel laureate T.D. Lee has bridged the gap between China and the United States, and today directs major institutes in both countries. In December 1941,...
A New Day for Delray: Florida Resort Revives with Classic Look
Cities struggling with urban blight can learn much from tiny Delray Beach, which opted to restore its intriguing "Old Florida" look rather than cave in to the wrecker's ball. Delray Beach, Florida, is the Field of Dreams of American cities. Hit by...
'Bring Country Music Back Home!'
The crossover crisis in country music has become so confused that there's a good chance Metallica will play the Grand Old Opry, argues our Nashville-based critic. Country music has always been both a sponge, soaking up outside popular music, and...
Cultural Revolution and Character Formation
Popular wisdom holds that during the sixties the youth peer culture transformed American life by becoming a counterculture. The immediate upshot was to introduce a whole succession of changes in social life. These changes included an upswing in drug...
Depths of Their Souls: Mystics of the Galilee
"If I didn't believe in reincarnation, I couldn't believe in God," says Israeli Col. Hamzi Arida. As he sees it, "God wouldn't have allowed one and a half million children to be killed in the Holocaust unless he had resolved to give them another chance...
Driven by Demographics
The surging and ebbing of a nation's population play a big role in a country's economic health. With all the mind-numbing ranks of mathematical equations and diagrams used to teach university-level economics, it's easy to forget that it's a behavioral...
Feeding the World with Biotech Crops
By expanding farm output, genetic engineering can play a key role in meeting the food needs of a larger, more affluent human population without further devastating valuable wildlife habitat. Genetic engineering is likely to be a major factor in raising...
Feminism's Matriarch
Betty Friedan was brutalized by injustice early in life--but it had nothing to do with bias against women. In her Peoria, Illinois, high school, Jews not welcome in sororities or fraternities, which played a big role at school. And the Betty Goldstein...
From Statism to Capitalism
Israel has a difficult road to travel before it can shake off the legacy of its early socialist days. As Israelis celebrate their country's fiftieth anniversary, they can look back with pride on their nearly miraculous achievements, not least their...
How Asia Went from Boom to Gloom
In December 1994, East Asian political and economic leaders looked aghast at the meltdown of Mexico's economy and prayed fervently that East would remain East and West would remain West and never the twain would meet. But three years later, alas,...
How Federal and State Policies Spread AIDS
I am one of the few venereal disease investigators, if not the only one, who has been allowed to interview HIV-positive patients and trace HIV/AIDS contacts since 1985. I have observed many aspects of this disease not reported to the general public,...
How Jewish a State?
Pluralism is the basic demand of Conservative Reform, and secular Jews, but it is out of the question for Orthodox Jews. It probably comes as a surprise to people elsewhere, but most citizens of the Jewish state regard conflicts within Israeli society...
In Love with the Bible
For the past thirteen years, Ratner has devoted himself to creating artwork based on narratives from the Bible, and has founded a museum in Israel and now one in the United States for biblical art. "I'm a storyteller in art," says sculptor-painter Phillip...
Music Lessons in Cyberspace: The Manhattan School of Music's Innovative Program
The Manhattan School of Music's Innovative Program Utilizing cutting edge technology, violinist Pinchas Zukerman passes on his age-old craft through videoconferencing, private instruction that is also a master class and a recording session. Seiji...
Numerical Patterns in Nature
Certain naturally occurring arrangements are mysteriously linked to number sequences that seem unrelated to the relevant phenomena. Philosophers and mathematicians have often wondered why mathematics, a construct of the human mind, is so successful...
Pat Musick: The Concourse of Man and Nature
In her multimedia wall sculptures, Arkansas artist Pat Musick explores the distinctness and yet the interconnectedness of human and natural forces. Weathered wood and rough stone intersect with smooth molded hydrocal (plasterlike) forms, canvas-covered...
Plantation Teatime
The only tea plantation in America inspires a Carolina low country afternoon tea. If thou art cold, tea will warm thee; If thou art hot, tea will cool thee; If thou art sad, tea will cheer thee; If thou art cross, tea will calm thee. William Gladstone...
Scrabbling at the Equator: Gold Mining in Kalimantan
Clinging to any available perch, the eight of us bounce and shudder as thick red mud sprays from the four-wheel drive "taxi's" spinning tires. We climb higher and higher up the steep hillsides, the jungle pressing close on either side. Drooping vines...
Sexual Harassment: Who Is Liable to the Victim?
Over the last few decades, American society has wrestled with the vexing question of what exactly is acceptable behavior between the sexes in the workplace. When does innocent flirtation and physical contact stop and offensive sexual harassment begin?...
Should Tom Paine Have Filed with the FEC?
Thomas Paine, the author of Common Sense, was lucky that King George wasn't running for reelection in 1776. Common Sense was more than a rallying cry for independence for the American colonies; it attacked the ruling monarch in the most personal terms....
Six Days at Sea
There is plenty of time for reflection, dining, and relaxation while cruising across the north atlantic on the QE2. Two hundred miles south of Newfoundland, just off the Grand Banks, Queen Elizabeth 2 passengers and crew alike watched Princess Diana's...
Strategies for Victory
In 1994, Republicans adopted an aggressive, pugnacious, in-your-face campaign strategy. They used their "Contract With America" like a broadsword that slashed through Democratic bone and sinew across the land. Republicans thundered to victory...
The Misbegotten Sixties
Professor Garrett argues that the generation of the sixties was a continuation of a liberalizing, public-spirited, and idealistic tradition that had been interrupted by the risk-aversive generation of the fifties. It is a generation able to self-consciously...
The Power of Music
Selectively chosen and carefully designed musical compositions can help fortify our immune system, reduce our feeling of pain, and enhance certain higher mental functions. It's been a thoroughly rotten day at work. The major project you've been nursing...
The Selling of Global Warming
Media organizations around the country have taken what experts say is a disturbingly partisan plunge on a politically and scientifically murky issue. The issue is global warming-one that could have economic implications of hundreds of billions...
Varying Shades of Desert Talent: Experimental Theater in the Middle East
Experimental Theather in the Middle East A Cairo festival bridges the gap between Western ideas of progress and Islamic cultural traditions. Such an event best takes place in the land where time is a censored eternity. In the West, we have gotten into...
Wake-Up Call from Watts
Walter Mosley's latest hero, an aging ex-con, faces unbearable moral choices in the meanest streets of LA. Warning, mystery fans! It may be that Walter Mosley's long string of detective novels has come to an end. His new book, Always Outnumbered,...
Walking Jerusalem's Ramparts
The sacred intersects the profane on a walk atop the stone walls of Israel's Holy City. Leaning against the cool stones, I gaze down at the stream of humanity eddying beneath me; frayed Abyssinian clerics, Arab children switching at donkeys, Hasidic...
When a God Awakes: Symbolism in Japan's Mysterious Creature Movies
This Memorial Day, Hollywood will unleash its latest, state-of-the-special-effects-art monster on America. Godzilla will emerge from the ocean, stomp on citizens and property alike, brush off every weapon that an overmatched military can throw at...
Who's in Charge of Nuclear Waste: Industry Can Handle It, Government Has a Role
Industry Can Handle It The Department of Energy's recent announcement that it could not accept high-level radioactive waste from the country's nuclear power plants came as no surprise, since the government has no place to put it. The problem...