The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 9, September

4 Days for the Prophet: Kenya's Maulidi Festival Celebrates the Birth of Muhammad
People who live in Kenya's Lamu archipelago wait all year for Maulidi, the celebration they hold in commemoration of the Prophet Muhammad's birth. Thousands of their relatives and friends, from East Africa and abroad, descend on the tiny town of Lamu...
A Day in the Life of a Committee
What Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan says at a hearing can make or break the world's financial centers. It is 10:00 A.M. on June 10, an hour before the hearing of the Joint Economic Committee (JEC), and already Nita Morgan, the committee's...
America's Jack: The Trickster Hero of Our Shy Tradition
My daughter Lindsay, 8, is an avid reader. Never a particularly good sleeper, she got an early start on a habit she has to this day--reading in bed. Propped up on pillows, a single light upon her nightstand illuminating the room, and the local oldies...
A Parable for the Millennium
Robert Stone's Israel crackles with religious and political tensions as a fascinating assortment of fanatics conspire to obliterate the nation in order to save it. For Robert Stone, America's most eloquent chronicler of the impending apocalypse,...
A Punjabi Preeti Bhojan
AN UNEXPECTED BIRTHDAY PARTY IN LONDON TURNS OUT TO BE A PUNJABI FEAST CELEBRATED WITH LOVE. My first reaction was that orange and black aren't my favorite colors, but with a little coaxing I tried on the beautiful shalwar and kameez, handed to me...
Brothers of the Seals: Aleut Teenagers Save Endangered Creatures
The seal struggles and flashes its canines while the three teenagers carry its wiggling, muscular body to a restraining board. Around the animal's neck, a loop of green fishing net--discarded or lost by a fishing vessel somewhere in the Bering Sea--has...
Can the CIA Be Fixed?
Can the Central Intelligence Agency be fixed? When U.S. intelligence failed to predict India's nuclear testing in May, the director of Central Intelligence (DCI) asked Adm. David Jeremiah, former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to investigate....
Chat Boxes in the Sky
With the imminent inauguration of satellite networks in relatively low orbits, individuals and businesses will be able to satisfy an unprecedented range of their global communications needs. You are on a vacation with some friends--hiking, whitewater...
Choreography Down Under
Free Radicals, a new work by Sydney Dance Company artistic director Graeme Murphy, highlights Australia's affinity for space, light, and movement. The spotlight falls on Xue-Jun Wang. Barechested, tall, and chiseled like a god, he raises his head...
Clinton in China
BEIJING SUMMIT CHINA--U.S. President Clinton's China visit marks another major event in the development of Sino-U.S. relations. The leaders of China and the United States agreed to continue to make greater strides toward the goal of a constructive...
Darwin in the Dock
Michael Behe Works in a university biochemistry laboratory probing the lilliputian protoplasmic world of the cell. He's a scientist who brings to bear his arsenal of pipettes and reagents chromatography columns and mass spectrometers, to unlock the...
Do Congressional Hearings Still Matter?
Fiery debates and close votes on the Senate and House floors win the headlines and the public's attention, but committee hearings are where Congress does much of its business. There are three kinds of hearings--legislative, oversight, and confirmation....
Dostoyevsky and Holy Russia
In 1867, Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) and his wife, Anna, visited the Kunstmuseum in Basel, Switzerland. There they saw a large painting titled Dead Christ by the sixteenth-century German Hans Holbein. Anna glanced at it and moved on. A quarter...
Holding Things Together
Cars, bridges, skyscrapers, natural gas pipelines, and even computers would be much more expensive, or perhaps nonexistent, were it not for the unheralded technology of welding. Metals are the biggest component of automobiles, and the manner in which...
Hollywood's Techno-Blockbuster Mentality
As success breeds success, blockbusters breed blockbusters, and Tinseltown's craze for special-effects spectaculars is crowding out more subtle fare. More than any other art, cinema depends on technology, and from its beginnings Hollywood has commanded...
Indelibly Delacroix
An exhibition honoring the bicentennial of Delacroix's birth shows that, although the artist's Romantic-era melodramatics may not appeal to modern tastes he remains an admirably able painter. The exhibition devoted to the last thirteen years of Eugene...
Integration under the Hupa: Interracial Marriage in Israel
Social worker Enatmar Hillel is still slightly embarrassed when she tells what happened to her several months ago. She and her lawyer husband had advertised in a Tel Aviv paper for someone to look after their children when both were at work. But when...
Janet Fish: Celebrating Light
Throughout her thirty-five-year career, Janet Fish has pursued her own direction in art, regardless of fashionable styles and concepts. In the early 1960s she began painting what she saw--a gutsy decision, as this was the heyday of Abstract Expressionism....
Jersey Jewels: Growing Tomatoes in the Garden State
"There's no tomato better than the Jersey tomato in the world," says Robert "Mattie" Matarazzo. For three generations, his family has been farming in New Jersey, growing the Garden State's most notable crops like tomatoes, sweet corn, and peaches....
Know Your Enemy: Iraq before Saddam Hussein
Iraq is now a repressive police state headed by Saddam Hussein. Recent wars have devastated and demoralized the people, who suffer under the economic embargo imposed by the United States and its allies after the Gulf War of 1991. Deprived of food...
Line-Item Veto Is Unconstitutional
Even though the nation's treasury has been "plundered" to the point of national peril, and even though Congress has a complete "failure of political will" to stop its "persistent excessive spending," the Supreme Court nonetheless refused to allow...
Long Arms of the Deep
Capable of darting at exceptional speeds modulating their colors in a flash, squid straddle contrary roles as aggressive hunters and apprehensive hunted. I was scuba diving off the Caribbean island of Bonaire when I looked up and suddenly found myself...
Mackintosh Demythologized
Was his work Art Nouveau or proto-Deco? Cerebral or sensuous? Scotland's complex Charles Rennie Mackintosh continues to fascinate, even as he transcends popular myth. A popular myth surrounds Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the artist-architect-designer...
No Menace to Neighbors
Iraq has neither threatened nor attacked any Middle Eastern states not involved in territorial disputes with it. It is said that the truth is the first casualty of war. Much of what Americans today unquestioningly believe about Iraq, including the...
Norway's 'Jugendstil' Town
If you think Art Nouveau architecture belongs to only big cities like Brussels and Barcelona, better think again. Tiny Alesund on Norway's western coast has some of the best Jugendstil around. The town of Alesund on Norway's rugged western coast...
Not a Military Threat
Saddam is not a military threat to the Middle East, but he has become a political nightmare not only for the United States but also for its Arab allies. With its aggressive policies and terrible human-rights record, Saddam Hussein's regime is repugnant....
Patented Genes: An Ethical Appraisal
The biotech industry's pursuit of patents on products of nature raises questions about intellectual ownership of materials that are discovered rather than invented. On May 18, 1995, about 200 religious leaders representing 80 faiths gathered in Washington,...
Race-Based Programs Are on the Defensive
When, if ever, should government use race as a criterion for law or policy? This question is a perennial one in American politics, of course, because of the unique history of African Americans. Many ethnic groups have come to America, both before...
Race Should Be Used for Governmental Decision Making: An Interview with Paul Butler
Paul Butler is associate professor of law at the George Washington University Law School, in Washington, D.C. He was formerly with the U.S. Justice Department's Public,Integrity Section, where he prosecuted, among others, a member of Congress, several...
Reawakening Midway
IN A GROUNDBREAKING ARRANGEMENT, THE U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE HAS JOINED WITH A PRIVATE COMPANY TO OFFER WILDLIFE-ORIENTED RECREATIONAL TRIPS TO MIDWAY ATOLL. Twenty-foot rollers rush toward us from across the open ocean. From their peaks I...
Revolutionary Referenda
It was a gutter fight. A $45 million one, but a gutter fight nonetheless. It was California's Proposition 226, the "union paycheck protection" measure that would have forced union leaders to get approval from their members before spending their money...
Robert Stone's 'Damascus Gate.'
The New York harbor tugboats provided employment for the Brooklyn family of Scottish Presbyterians and Irish Catholics into which Robert Stone was born in 1937. The future novelist, "always kind of in love with language," attended Catholic schools...
Still a Formidable Enemy
Israel considers Saddam a potential menace to its soft belly--the long border with Jordan. Americans--as well as Arabs and indeed everybody else--remember the Gulf War of 1991 as it actually occurred. Their perception of the threat posed by Saddam...
Stretching Fat with Starch
Blasting starch and oil with a steam jet yields a unique material with potential applications ranging from ice cream to coatings, hand lotions, and plywood adhesives. What if ...? As our minds are exposed to new ideas, materials, and information, occasionally...
The Changing Role of the Committee
In an ever-more partisan Congress, committees will become increasingly irrelevant in the legislative process. A congressman elected in 1974 was asked by his local newspaper what committees he wanted to serve on in Washington. He replied that he had...
The Emergence of a Global Society
So much of what we take for granted in 2000 would have been unimaginable in 1000. In our MTV culture, image and the moment are everything. Context and history are usually ignored. The approaching end of the millennium, however, provides an impetus...
The Gems of Florence
A VAST NUMBER OF MUSEUMS AND ARCHITECTURAL LANDMARKS LINE THE STREETS OF ONE OF EUROPE'S ARTISTIC CAPITALS, BRINGING FLORENTINE RENAISSANCE ART TO LIFE. I stood in the bustling heart of Florence, the Italian city that gave birth to the Renaissance,...
The Pluses and the Minuses
President Bill Clinton visited China from June 25 to July 3, returning the visit of Chinese President Jiang Zemin in October 1997. The visit was mired in controversy long before it began. Clinton was able to score some rhetorical victories and give...
They Still Make a Difference
From the Marshall Plan to the Contract With America, congressional hearings have led to the passage of significant legislation. Mere mention of the words congressional hearing connotes major media extravaganzas to many Americans. The phrase suggests...
Tradition in Transition: Sanskrit Education in Varanasi, India
Assembled under a colorful canopy in the open courtyard of Chandra Prakash Lada's palatial home, thirty lightly clad Hindu boys solemnly recite an ancient Vedic oath of studenthood: "Mama brahmachara kamavada, Kamobhakshanadi dosh nirasana. ...
Triumph over Chaos: A Profile of John Cheever
When Cheever died in 1982, he left a rich legacy of five novels (including The Wapshot Chronicle, Bullet Park, and Falconer) and seven volumes of short stories. His last collection, The Stories of John Cheever, earned him a Pulitzer Prize, an American...
Turkey at the Crossroads
Turkey--seen by the United States as a geostrategic linchpin in the execution of U.S. policy at the crossroads of Europe and the Near East, Central Asia and the West, Christianity and Islam--today has become a test case to determine whether modem,...