The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 10, October

Alexis De Tocqueville
The French aristocrat Alexis de Tocqueville traveled throughout 1830s America to research his gigantic study of democracy. His two great books, Democracy in America and The Old Regime, show how both centralized government and egalitarianism grew over...
A Novelist of Moral Power and Passion: A Profile of Sigrid Undset
Seventy years ago, Norwegian novelist Sigrid Undset won the Nobel Prize in literature, principally for two masterworks--a trilogy and a tetralogy--set in early fourteenth-century Norway. These two novels, running to well over twelve hundred pages...
Architecture Renaissance Man: An Interview with Renzo Piano
This year's winner of the prestigious Pritzker Prize tells how he has translated a love of art, architecture, and engineering into an astounding variety of projects around the globe. Renzo Piano is the twenty-first architect to be honored with the...
Black and Independent
Raised on the wrong side of the railroad tracks, in South Philadelphia, J.A. (Jay) Parker had every excuse to stew in self-pity and to poison his life in futile fuming over white hegemony. Instead, when he was yet a boy in an America where racial...
China and the World
The global community is seeking to encourage China the aspiring global citizen while avoiding appeasement of China the dictator. According to the Beijing leadership, the world has nothing to fear from China's rise. "China," said President Jiang Zemin...
Diseased Societies
Although industrialized nations have seen great advances in controlling infectious diseases in the twentieth century, these historic great killers of humanity remain entrenched in the developing world and are resurging in the developed world. "Flu epidemic...
Enamel Enigmas
Cloisonne enamel jewelry is a magical medium in which to work. Not only does it provide seemingly infinite possibilities in terms of shape, color, texture, and intensity, but it can also be a rich, delicate, indeed radiant "canvas" on which the artist...
Fighting the Implacable Foe
Even as new infectious diseases appear unexpectedly and old ones proliferate with a vengeance, the battle against them requires global strategies that involve the general public as well as the scientific and medical professions. It was May 14, 1796....
Germany: A Strict Approach
Germany will continue its life-without-drugs stance and resist all demands for illicit drugs to be legalized. The International Narcotics Control Board shares the view that the European states must more firmly oppose legalization trends and must promote...
If Water Takes the Land Will Namibia's Himba Lose Their Ancestral Home?
Traditional ways of life are intimately related to the environments in which they flourish. When the environment is threatened, so too is the way of living. Such is the case today with the Himba people of northwestern Namibia. A small tribe, estimated...
Internet News: Cybergold or Cybersludge?
From the moment Matt Drudge, the self-styled Walter Winchell of Internet news, stepped to the microphone at the journalists' mecca of the Washington National Press Club, he was on the attack. It was clear he was there to take on the press establishment...
Is Obuchi the Answer?
Keizo Obuchi, Japan's new rime minister and its sixth since the election of President Clinton in 1992, is a man who has his work cut out for him. His predecessor, Ryutaro Hashimoto, resigned unceremoniously in accepting responsibility for his Liberal...
Know Your Enemy
The world of infectious diseases and the agents that cause them is not so foreign if we take a little time to explore it. Most of us will probably catch a cold this year. Someone in our family may come down with the flu as well. Those of us over 35...
Lift High the Cross
Every September, in a sacred space in upstate New York, a man lifts a wooden cross above his head. It is a simple act, unremarkable when viewed out of context. Yet for the hundreds of Russian Orthodox clergy, monastics, and laity gathered in the cathedral...
Marxism's Graveyard
As communist governments of the Soviet empire crumbled at the close of the 1980s, the most poignant images reaching the West were of celebrating mobs pulling down and destroying icons of their socialist masters. Statues of Lenin came crashing down. Lesser...
Modern-Day Inventors
In 1899, President McKinley was advised to close the U.S. Patent Office because, according to the commissioner of patents, Charles Duell, "Everything that can be invented has been invented." Nearly five million patents have been issued since. ...
Mozart Mania
The legacy of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is being played to the hilt by the good citizens of Salzburg, Austria, the hometown of one of the Greatest composers of all time. The "miracle which God let be born in Salzburg," according to Mozart's father, Leopold,...
Mummies and Martyrs
Walking among the dead, laughter subsides and chatter fades away. Each corpse's last motion in the grave has been the same, its mouth dropped open in a silent, petrified scream. In this narrow, darkened hallway we look through soiled glass onto the careless...
Mysterious Megaliths: The Standing Stones of Carnac, Brittany, France
We saw them for the first time in the pale, pastel light of early evening: row after row of grayish-pink granite stones, some twelve feet tall, stretching ten rows deep across the countryside. More than a thousand standing stones, each one nestling...
'Publius': The Federalist Papers
New York's struggle over whether to adopt the 1787 Constitution was critical to the nation's survival and perhaps to avoiding civil war. The Constitution's draftsman, James Madison, along with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, anonymously coauthored 85...
Revolutions in America and France
The American and French Revolutions, separated by eight years, invoked similar principles of human rights, yet the two were radically different. When Parliament tried to impose taxes on the colonies after they had enjoyed 150 years of freedom...
Rita MacNeil, Canada's Beloved Troubadour
Though virtually unknown in the United States, songstress Rita MacNeil is an admirable musical ambassador for Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, and brings good, clean family entertainment to the stage. As Rita MacNeil moved through the hotel lobby in London,...
Russia's Secret Arms Market
The perilous post-Cold War world is upon us, at a moment when the presidency is deeply weakened and American foreign policy appears all but in total disarray. Many thought when communism collapsed that history had ended, that the world would be...
Schools, the Workplace, and Sexual Harassment
With the scourge of sexual harassment still prevalent in the workplace and schools, many victims are fighting back through the courts. Because the sexual harasser (or predator, in the case of molesting schoolchildren) usually has a low income, victims...
Science from a Distance
The technology for conducting collaborative research between geographically dispersed team members is getting better, but it isn't yet really "like being there." At the Ford Research Laboratory in Dearborn, Michigan, Chaitanya Narula is trying to find...
Sculpting the Earth
Featuring complex shapes, precipitous drops, And multiple geologic traits, canyons manifest Some of nature's most spectacular scenery. Mother Nature's recipe for a good canyon: In a large basin, place a layer of soft rock a couple hundred feet thick,...
Seattle's Silver Lining
In its twenty-fifth anniversary season, the very capable Pacific Northwest Ballet has premiered a remarkable ballet based on the music of cherished composer Jerome Kern. Fifty-five years ago Agnes de Mille made theatrical history with her dances...
Sound Waves
In Aki Kaurismaki's 1989 film Leningrad Cowboys Go America, a hapless group of stone-faced Finnish musicians tours the United States, looking for fame. Wearing complicated pompadours and enormous, ski-shaped boots, the ten member band finds itself...
Splits in the Political Parties
Just imagine four Republican Parties and a dozen or more issue-based splinters of the Democratic Party. That's the way it seems to be in this election season. In the absence of Ronald Reagan's unifying influence, GOP factions have in recent years...
Taking Social Security Private
Less than five years ago, Social Security was not part of the policy debate in Washington. Yes, there was a small handful of privatization advocates in think tanks and academia, but skittish policymakers viewed the program as the "third rail" of politics....
The Netherlands: Let's Be Realistic
Drug use is fact of life and needs to be discouraged in as practical a manner as possible. "The Dutch policy on drugs is a disastrous mistake. The Netherlands regrets its liberal policy and is about to turn back the clock." "Drug use has increased...
The Power of the PLA
China's military has used its formidable resources to threaten Taiwan, buy nuclear weaponry, and expand a commercial empire. In July 1998, China became the world's tenth-largest trading nation, a meteoric rise from insignificance two decades before....
The Republicans' Common Heritage
The tension between the "religious right" and the "supply-side" components of the Republican coalition is fragmenting the coalition and threatening the party's future. That much is clear. Perhaps less obviously, this tension reflects a betrayal...
The Rise of Limited Government
Political history in the West has largely consisted of attempts to put into action the religious principle--going back as far as Moses and the Ten Commandments--that rulers must obey the higher law. Israelite leaders, like their people, often violated...
The Struggle against Absolutism
The twentieth century could accurately be described as the century of the totalitarian temptation. The greatest conflict of all time was waged in the middle of the century to crush the forces of fascism and national socialism. The other great totalitarian...
The Tao of Womanhood: Nature's Wisdom for Today's Women
Hold to your heart The wisdom of Tao Because through it We discover Our own answers, Learn the ways Of power and peace, And find the greatest treasure Under heaven. (Tao Te Ching, 62)(1) For over two thousand...
Touring with the Sun
Two American scholars spend A year in Sahagun, discovering The life, art, and nature Of Spain's northern Plateau region. Appearances are often deceiving. The small (population 3,500), adobe-walled town of Sahagun hardly looks like a tourist destination,...
Vanishing Scarecrows
The scarecrow, once a common sight, has virtually vanished from fields around the world, to the delight only of the birds it was intended to frighten away from lucrative and life-sustaining crops. The scarecrow's decline began as a consequence...
Vincent Treasure Trove; the Van Gogh Museum's Van Goghs
Van Gogh died virtually unkown, but his brother Theo and Theo's heirs preserved his works and made him known to the world. Seventy works from their priceless collection now come to America. "What I want and aim at is confoundingly difficult, and...
Where Is China Headed?
The October Special Report in Current Issues is entitled "The Challenge of China." Until June 1989, there was good reason to believe that China would move, if only slowly, in a democratic direction, even though Deng Xiaoping was no more willing to...
Which Way for the Chinese Economy?
In the next decade, the Chinese economy is less likely to maintain high two-digit growth, even assuming a stable political situation. China's economy achieved a remarkable two-digit growth (10 percent annually) from 1981 until 1997. But in the first...