The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 4, April

A Better Health-Care System
Ten times more people die each year from reactions to prescription drugs than from using illicit drugs. More than 40 million Americans are uninsured. One in four women over 50 has not had a breast or pelvic exam in the past year. More than 180,000...
Advocate for Family Values
James Dobson Jr. likes to say he's his father's son. But his father was a minister in the Church of the Nazarene, while the son pursued a profession in the secular world, securing his doctorate in child development. But father and son were indeed...
AIDS in South Africa
On October 9, 1998, South African Deputy President Thabo Mbeki began an address to the South African nation with the following words: "HIV/AIDS is among us. It is real. It is spreading. We can only win against HIV/AIDS if we join hands to save our...
Alexander Bogdanov and Tektology
This month the Natural Science section treats the work of Alexander Bogdanov. He is proclaimed as the founder of "tektology," which is presented as a universal science of organization and a precursor of cybernetics and systems theory. There is no...
A Teller's Tale: Elizabeth McCracken Reveals Her Writing Inspirations
I'd like to tell you bizarre tales of circus freaks, murderers, and misanthropes that end just as abruptly as they start; yet alas, dear reader, I cannot. These exceptional plots belong to Elizabeth McCracken, National Book Award finalist, one of twenty...
Breads for Christ
From italian dove-shaped loaves to greek breads decorated with red-dyed eggs representing christ's blood, many european easter breads are shaped to symbolize the season. When the Easter season approaches, European kitchens are filled with the yeasty...
Bring on the Clones: Twenty-Something Shows Run Amok
The networks are turning out inane, trendy sitcoms at a record rate. Advertisers targeting young people with lots of money to spend may have something to do with it. Critics of American culture generally begin their onslaught by defining it as youth-obsessed....
From This Month's Menu
Forty-seven million people worldwide have been infected with HIV. Thirty percent of them are already dead. New infections are occurring faster than the deaths of those already infected. In our Global Forum this month on The Reality of Global AIDS,...
Gardens of Hope
The restorative power of healing gardens in clinical settings is being tapped to help rejuvenate patients' bodies, minds, and souls. Mary Hulse has always loved gardening. But since she was diagnosed with cancer, her hobby has taken on new meaning....
How Other Central Banks Work
A nation's ability to control inflation depends on the structure of its central bank and the relationship between the central bank and the government. Anation's ability to control inflation depends on the structure of its central bank and the relationship...
Inside the Federal Reserve
It influences the size of your monthly mortgage payments and the interest on your credit cards. Its decisions cause stock prices to rise and fall. It raises its own budget and evades congressionional oversight. "It" is the Federal Reserve System. ...
International Corruption: So What?
Nancy Bord During just one month of 1998, international press headlines reported that * In Venezuela, judges were accused of taking bribes to let drug traffickers go free. * In Tanzania, the government's anticorruption drive was itself allegedly...
It's Over
Instead of the long national nightmare, it turned out to be a long national anticlimax. William Jefferson Clinton became only the second American president to undergo an impeachment trial in the Senate. However, this historic event was notable for...
Molly Stone, Michael Coh
The Beauty of Opposites The enormous strides glass artists Michael Cohn and Molly Stone have made in their field flow out of the love they share for their craft. "When we bring our individual passions and talents together, the art is bigger than...
'Nano-Cables in the Melt'
Twenty-first-century alloys will be stronger, lighter, more corrosion resistant, and less expensive, thanks to procedures for naturally growing in molten metals ball-like carbon molecules linked together by metal atoms to form strands and multilevel...
Out of Control? AIDS Threatens to Engulf the World If Lifestyles Do Not Change
If you read at an average speed, this article should take you five minutes to finish. By the time you reach the end, 50 people around the world will have died from AIDS and another 55 will have become infected with HIV. Inevitably, that means more...
Point of Entry: Baltimore, the Other Ellis Island
Ellis Island in New York harbor is well known as the main entry point for European immigrants in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. What many do not know is that Baltimore was the second- leading port of entry at that time. The establishment...
Religion and the Secular Ethos
Over two hundred years ago, the Founding Fathers alluded to an authority that was prior to the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Democracy for them was not just a grand theory of government; it was also a philosophy of life to be passed...
Rending the Veil: The Search for the Spiritual in Recent Cinema
Four films explore the ramifications of earthly life in light of the great beyond--but, to paraphrase the Good Book, where there is no vision the picture perishes. The end of 1998 unexpectedly brought us a small spate of well- publicized features...
Rites of Spring
From awakenings and mass migrations to brilliant landscapes, mating rituals, and countless births, spring arrives to celebrate life. A black-lined streak of russet-and-brown fur scurries across the path, intent on its mission. Hurrying along from...
Should the Fed Be Reformed?
The Federal Reserve was designed to minimize both political influence and the possibility of control by special interests. The popularity of the Federal Reserve, the nation's central bank, rises and falls with economic conditions. During the high-interest-rate...
Symphony and Dissonance
Music and Loss Flutist Becir Drnda divides his time between the Sarajevo Philharmonic Orchestra and the city's conservatory, where he teaches. After thirty- seven years in the philharmonic, he looks forward to the day when one of his students will...
Symphony and Dissonance: Uniting Bosnia through Music
The passions of war did not quickly fade for the Sarajevo Philharmonic Orchestra, which had gained worldwide attention during the siege of Sarajevo. A collection of Muslims, Croats, Serbs, Jews, and others that had played under fire, the philharmonic...
Thailand: Lessons from a Strong National Response to HIV/AIDS
Few today are unaware of the rapid growth of the HIV epidemic in Thailand, because it has been well documented and widely publicized. In fact, many think of the Thai epidemic as the first in Asia, even though HIV prevalence was first documented among...
The Census Case: No Statistical Apportionment
Last November "the census case" was argued before the Supreme Court [see"Stand Up and Be Counted," The World & I, January 1999]. Readers will recall that this case involved the question of whether the U.S. Census Bureau could use statistical sampling...
The Mark of Africa
Barbara Kingsolver imaginatively considers what happens when an American missionary family's notions of family and faith collide with the culture, history, and destiny of West Africa in the 1960s. Roberta Rubenstein, professor of literature at American...
The Politics of Pathology
Which disease research deserves more government funding? When you get down to the individual-case level, it's hard to say, for each story is more poignant than the next. One, for example, is that of 43-year-old Sara, affected for 18 years by...
The Scientific Revolution Reshapes the World: Galileo Galilei
Galileo was the first of seven children of the musician Vincenzo Galilei and his noble-born wife, Julia. Born February 15, 1564, Galileo attended a monastic school at Vallombrosa before entering the University at Pisa in 1581, intending to study medicine....
The Scientific Revolution Reshapes the World: Nicolaus Copernicus
Born in Thorn, Prussia (now Torun, Poland) in 1473, Nicolaus Copernicus received a wide-ranging education in the expectation that he would become a church official. He studied classics and mathematics at Krak- w, law and astronomy at Bologna, and law,...
The Scientific Revolution Reshapes the World: Paracelsus
Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombast von Hohenheim, who took the name Paracelsus when he was about 20 years old, was born in 1493. He learned about metallurgy from his father, who was a physician and teacher at the vocational school that trained...
The Scientific Revolution Reshapes the World: Sir Isaac Newton
Isaac Newton--generally considered one of the most brilliant figures of history--was born in Woolsthorpe, England, on Christmas Day, 1642. His birth took place under difficult circumstances: He was a premature baby whose survival was at considerable...
The Social Message of Sargent's Art
To the Editor: I must dispute Herb Greer's claim that John Singer Sargent can be understood outside his social context ["Sargent's Exuberant Artistry," January 1999, p. 114]. Social context, of course, covers more ground than private life in the...
Three Decades of Change: The Shan Villages of Northwestern Thailand
The Shan tribal people live in the hills of northwestern Thailand, near the Burmese border. Over the past 150 years or so they have carved out small irrigation systems to water rice fields leveled in the narrow valleys. Since their arrival--from Burma--the...
Time
February 22, 1999 President clinton acquitted A gloat-free zone UNITED STATES--President Clinton and his spokesman, Joe Lockhart, both made all the right noises in the wake of the Senate vote; no vindication was claimed, and the president's...
Tribe and Scalia on the Constitution: A Third View
Most Americans understand that a vitally important aspect of the American constitutional system is the rule of law. However, few understand what the rule of law means as it applies to constitutional interpretation. If you read the editorial pages...
What the Fed Does and Doesn't Do
The Federal Reserve oversees the money supply, supervises banks, and acts as a lender of last resort. The Bessemer Trust Company, like many top investment and forecasting firms on Wall Street, recently advised clients not to worry if President Clinton...
Your Mother Is Still Your Mother
Games and Toys in Traditional Zambia: Part One The last cooked ear of sweet corn is now firmly in the grip of the family's 2-year-old. Three older siblings beg the child to share. "Split the corn with us," they plead. But to no avail. The toddler...