The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 2, February

A Chicken Farmer Goes to Sea
A FISHING INNOCENT CROSSES THE GULF OF ALASKA ABOARD A COMMERCIAL FISHING BOAT. I am, according to one skipper, a "chicken farmer"--that is, not a fisherman. But when I was invited to spend a few weeks aboard a commercial fishing boat, I jumped at...
A Country for Our Time?
In this month's Special Report on "Clinton and the Congress," senior editor Lee Edwards has a piece called "A President for Our Time?" Our readers know I'm not a fan of the president's. But I've also become sour on the political system and disappointed...
A Policy for Freedom in China
While the collapse of communism in the former Soviet Union gives us hope that China, too, will one day be free, the current government of the People's Republic of China (PRC) exercises control over more people than any one-party dictatorship in history....
A President for Our Time?
A lame-duck but serene Bill Clinton is confident history will judge him fairly and well. Despite the legal and ethical questions about his campaign fund-raising actions, despite Whitewater and Paula Jones, despite the indictments and convictions...
Diebenkorn - a Different Drummer
Ignoring prevailing trends, Richard Diebenkorn renounced abstraction for the figurative and later returned to abstraction, all in a relentless search for "the straight and simple." Richard Diebenkorn, one of the premier American painters of the post-World...
Ferment on the Frontier: The Story of the Buffalo Soldiers
During the U.S. Civil War, over 150,000 black men enlisted in the Union forces. In July 1865, more than 123,000 of them were still in uniform, divided among about 150 regiments. As the army mustered out its veterans, black and white alike, its numbers...
Gino Quilico - beyond Cool
Canadian operatic baritone Gino Quilico May play rock guitar, but there's more to Him than Mr. Cool--a slim escape from a Car bomb resolved him to make each moment Count, in life and in music. Over the course of his twenty-year career, Canadian baritone...
Going by the 'Book.' (Torah)
As with almost all his colleagues in the U.S. Senate, Joseph Lieberman (D-Connecticut) works at a furious pace during the week. But alone among them, he looks forward with relish to enveloping himself in that sanctum of rest, prayer, study, and family...
Haiti: U.S. Embarrassment?
Just up from the turnoff at the In God We Trust Bar and Restaurant, near where naked children swim and a fisherman casts his net into a fetid irrigation ditch, the road is scarred with the oily remains of recent tire burnings that barricade the road...
Handsome Visitors from the High Tundra
Exceptionally adapted to endure the freezing cold, snowy owls are magnificent birds that patrol the open landscapes of northern latitudes. If you happen to be in one of the northern states this winter, particularly in a low, open prairie or an eastern...
How Hong Kong May Vitalize China
Hong Kong is somewhat like a life preserver for the People's Republic of China--whose economy is in some ways ailing, contrary to popular perception. From providing a prodigious bailout for restructuring Chinas bloated state sector to making available...
Immigration and the Asian-American Experience
The recent media coverage of the alleged Asian connection in political fund-raising has put Asian Americans into the unwitting limelight of national politics, but it also highlights an issue that so far has not received adequate attention--the impact...
In the Footsteps of the Chakyars: India's Venerable Sanskrit Theater
Kudiyattam, the world' oldest surviving classical theater, is only flourishing in its original site in India, but growing in popularity among international audiences. India's skies were overcast the morning we caught the bus to Irinjalakuda from...
In the Spirit: Kathleen Atkins Wilson
"I try to use my artwork to help people to get in touch with their own spirituality, to see something within themselves or a way of living that is going to be enriching," says California artist Kathleen Atkins Wilson. Born in Ypsilanti, Michigan,...
Miracle Plants Withstand Flood and Drought
Having discovered that plants whose roots contain air-filled passages can tolerate a variety of adverse soil conditions, scientists are beginning to introduce this trait in agricultural crops. It all started with the "Great Dig of 1995" on the Spaulding...
Mystery Spirits: The Ghosts and Haunted Places of Prague
What better way to encounter the soul of an ancient central European city than to mingle with the spirits of the place? Sure, I could read about the official history of Prague, a city I find extraordinarily beautiful, but why be distracted by mere...
O.J., Marv - Haven't We Had Enough?
Ruthless producers and jaded talk-show hosts are willing to stop at nothing to beef up their ratings--and the average viewer is getting dumped on in the process. At the checkout counter of your local supermarket you most likely, at best, give...
Openness Should Be Preserved
The Internet currently provides a forum for millions of speakers on subjects as diverse as human thought. It also enables people around the world to access valuable information that was previously available only to a privileged few. In the landmark...
Prayers for Peace; India's Tibetan Buddhist Pilgrimage Centers
After the Red Chinese invaded and occupied Tibet in 1950, the traditional nation ceased to exist. Despite the claims of Chinese President Jiang Zemin, before the U.S. Congress last October, that Tibetans are "living in happiness and contentment,"...
Quiet Times in the Senate
Trent Lott's easygoing style is deceptively effective. Senators scampered to get out of town at the end of the first session of the 105th Congress in November. They were impatient with the House of Representatives and with President Clinton for the...
Reading the Rocks of Time
Russian paleontologist Iraida Pavlova Morozova has spent a career spanning nearly 50 years discovering and deciphering a fossil trail locked in limestone. From her laboratory in Moscow to the rugged slopes of Mongolia's Altai Mountains, Iraida Pavlova...
Sharing the Stage: Blacks in Country Music
Is country music in for a sea change? For some time now, Nashville has been riding a tsunami of twang, but the platinum-plated wave seams to have crested. The star-maker ship is still under steam, but up and down Music Row, you get the feeling that...
Should the Internet Be Regulated? Some Control Is Needed
A great deal of controversy surrounds the issue of regulating the Internet, particularly the possible regulation of Internet pornography. Opponents of such regulation sound the alarm: "Today pornography, tomorrow religion and politics." This seeming...
Sisterly Hands in Bosnia
By lending each other a helping hand, the women of Bosina are healing scars of war and ensuring a future of peace. Beba Hadeic knows firsthand the hell of war. A school administrator, she lived in Srebrenica, a Muslim city in Bosnia that was declared...
Slowly It Awakens: Laos Teeters on the Edge of Change
Three-wheeled taxicabs bounce, splash, and clatter over the potholed streets of Vientiane. A heavy monsoon downpour ended earlier this morning, and the sidewalks are now a series of gritty islands surrounded by black puddles. I pass orange-roofed...
The Battle for the House Continues
Republicans have the upper hand, but November is a light-year away politically. The 11-seat majority that Republicans have in the House of Representatives makes the 1998 elections particularly competitive this year. Republicans need a bigger...
The Character of Captain Ahab in Melville's 'Moby Dick.' (Herman Melville)
Melville's Moby-Dick may well be the greatest novel ever written by an American; and, setting aside the great white whale itself, Captain Ahab, skipper of the doomed ship, the Pequod, may be the most compelling character Melville ever created. The...
The CIA and Crack Cocaine Story: Fact or Fiction?
On August 18, 1996, the San Jose Mercury News launched a three-part series alleging a conspiracy involving the CIA, the Nicaraguan Contras, and an unwitting crack-cocaine entrepreneur named Rick Ross. The conspiracy's purported objective was to flood...
The Greening of Mars
The barren red planet could become a blossoming garden if strategies for changing it to the point where organisms from Earth, including humans, can live and thrive there prove viable and gain adequate support. The phrase "terraforming a planet" is somewhat...
The Rooftop of Japan
A priest in flowing black robes with shining golden embroidery met me at the temple entrance. The smell of incense was everywhere. He was a Jodo sect priest, bald-headed, and wore his robes with a certain grace. His glasses were of a vintage 1970s...
Trial and Ardor: Enhancing Marriage through Courtship
Starting in early elementary school, most Americans learn to regard February's approach with excitement and not a little dread. It is the month of valentine's cards and candies, and the triumphs and despairs of learning who did, and did not, harbor...
Troubles with Saddam (Saddam Hussein)(Editorial)
THE WORLD & I does not speak with a monolithic voice. In the Current Issues section, the World Views author's militant attitude toward Iraq is not mine. Yes, Yevgeny Primakov was an important member of the KGB. So was Gorbachev. It was not monolithic...
Tuning Up Music City: Earl Swensson Revitalizes Nashville
Mid-Tennessee,; booming metropolis is taking on a bold, fun look, thanks to a native son's imaginative style, firmly rooted in local architectural tradition. Earl Swensson sounds more like a man on a mission than an architect on assignment. The founder...
Watching from Inside
Today's implantable microchip devices used for identifying animals are the precursors of devices that may monitor, report on, and even regulate a spectrum of conditions in the bodies of animals and humans. Ten years ago I looked out my office door and...
What Is 'Indian Country'?
A proposed landfill in South Dakota and the building of a school in Alaska have prompted two cases involving Native Americans. Both raise the issue of which government, the tribal or state, has sovereign authority over lands claimed by federally recognized...
Women's Woes under Islam
In Pakistan, mullahs helped oust Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in 1990 and '96, insisting that "a woman's rule invites God's wrath." In Afghanistan, the Taleban student army that has conquered three-quarters of the country forces women to wear...
Yeltsin's Health and the Protestant Ethic in Russia
Despite reports to the contrary, modern Western life is slowly taking hold in post-Soviet society. How Russians view the country's move to democracy and market capitalism, however, varies from one individual to the next. Quite a few Russians view...