The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 7, July

Anatomy of a High School Dropout: Pulitzer Prize Winner Donald Murray
Journalists and writing teachers countrywide know about Donald Murray, who while working at the Boston Herald back in 1954 became the youngest person ever to win the Pulitzer Prize in journalism. A few know of Murray the artist, as sketched in his...
Architecture with a Twist: An Interview with Frank Gehry
Fresh from an international triumph with his Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in Spain, Gehry tells why he's been so successful at pushing the rational limits of architecture. For over three decades, Santa Monica-based architect Frank Gehry has been at work...
A Theory about Genius
How do geniuses come up with ideas? What is common to the thinking style that produced the Mona Lisa, as well as the one that spawned the theory of relativity? What characterizes the thinking strategies of the Einsteins, Edisons, da Vincis, Darwins,...
Auctioned Off: The English Class System in Practice
By the fall of 1974 I had been living for three years in Spain and London, subletting a villa here, a flat there, trying to make a living as a writer. I'd taught for seven years in universities, but academic life had palled. I had three books published...
Aversion to Africa?
The late March heat was stultifying, with humidity so thick you could hold it in your hand, and the crowd that had gathered in Accra, Ghana, to hear the American president speak was enormous. Dressed in everything from traditional robes to blue...
Clear Thinking about Morally Complex Questions
The Special Report in Current Issues this month--"Life Before Death"--raises issues that require sophisticated moral understanding. Yet we are ill equipped to talk to each other in ways that make moral sense, because our employment of formal analytical...
College Regulations Then and Now
As a Columbia University undergraduate in 19561 resided in Hartley Hall, a stately building on the Morningside campus. During orientation week I was introduced to my floor counselor, who said in an unambiguous way that no high jinks would be permitted...
Cuba on the Brink?
It is neither as good nor as bad in Fidel Castro's communist Cuba as most Americans think. Defenders of the regime say Castro has created a socialist paradise where schooling and health care are free and where the only problem is that the United...
Dancing the Universal Language
The Seoul-based Universal Ballet successfully blends the grace of traditional Korean folk dance with the bravura of the legendary Kirov company. Whoever originally named the Universal Ballet Company (UBC) was farsighted, indeed. The Korean troupe,...
Darkening the Sun
A solar eclipse, among the grandest of natural wonders, also provides the clearest glimpses of our Sun's mysterious atmosphere--the corona. "The Sun is half covered now. Notice the light getting dimmer?" says Eric Priest, a colleague from the University...
De We Need a Tobacco Bill?: The Issue Isn't Kids but Money
The president of the United States is being called some unseemly names. While that may well mark a new low in public discourse, those who are appalled by the disappearance of civility should first and more appropriately apply their horror to the degradation...
Do We Need a Tobacco Bill?: Emphatically Yes, and Now
Congress is currently taking up the most important legislation in the history of the tobacco industry. The current proposals, along with the pathbreaking settlement in four states, could bring long-overdue reform to America's tobacco status quo. As...
Elizabeth Catlett: The Power of Form
Elizabeth Catlett is one of the most respected and infuential American-born black women artists of the twentieth century. Throughout her career, which has spanned more than five decades, she has asserted that her art is to be of service to people. This...
Equality, Truth, and the American Way
Last November the Supreme Court heard two cases that went to the constitutional core of American jurisprudence: equality of the sexes and the right to defend oneself using polygraph test results, as discussed in this column in the January 1998 issue...
Expectations Lost and Found
A strong postcolonial narrative finds and unlikely setting in nineteenth-century England. Although Peter Carey's Jack Maggs owes its origins to Great Expectations, familiarity with Charles Dickens' tale about the convict Magwitch befriended by Pip...
Facing Death with True Dignity
There is growing movement to consider the spiritual as well as the physical dimension of death. Jim is a 35-year-old gentleman with AIDS. He has two children with whom he is very close. He is dying. Jim called me the other day because he said he...
Good Living: Milwaukee's Annual German Fest
Incorporated into the logo for Milwaukee's annual German Fest is the word gemutlichkeit (gum-MEAT-lick-kite). Not to be confused with its sneeze-blessing cousin, gesundheit, gemutlichkeit is defined as a combination of good living and camaraderie--both...
Hollywood Conservative
His sonorous bass voice, aristocratic mien, and almost photographic memory have served Charlton Heston well in art and in life. His splendid portrayals of spectacular men in film have moved the hearts of millions -- maybe hundreds of millions...
How Do We Die?
We often go to extraordinary lengths to avoid thinking about the one predictable fact of human existence: one day we shall die. Although Americans live longer, healthier lives than their ancestors did--or perhaps because of this--they seem to be...
How to Improve the Jury System
The subject of the American jury system raises conflicting cultural sentiments. While the jury trial is revered as the most democratic institution in our society, a summons for jury service is dreaded as an unwelcome intrusion into our lives. Jury...
Lavas and Life
While molten rock from a volcanic eruption is highly destructive, the cooled material is gradually colonized by uniquely adapted life forms. Perhaps you've watched it on TV or in a movie. If you were close enough to witness it in real life, odds are...
Life before Death
Although many prefer not to think about it, 2.3 million Americans die every year. How do they die? Heart disease remains the No. 1 cause, followed by cancer and stroke. AIDS is a distant eight among the leading causes of death. Where do they die?...
Making Connections
A unique exchange program pairs up native students from opposite sides of the globe. Gathered in the cool Siberian forest, a group of Navajo students watch as Yakov Tarlin, a Russian in his late twenties, takes aim at the trunk of a tall pine tree...
Mapping out the Driver's Web
Smart cars and clever roadways promise safer, faster, more efficient, and less polluting highway travel. The dream of automated highways, where robotlike vehicles drive their passengers without human intervention, is nearly as old as the highway itself....
Men in Black: Craft in Color
A breakthrough exhibition in Lancaster Pennsylvania, reveals the surprisingly colorful, artistic nature of the Amish. For many, especially the five million tourists a year now visiting Lancaster County, encountering the Amish lifestyle can be a bit...
More Noble Than Wood: Catalonia's Cork Industry
On a warm Sunday afternoon, fifteen or twenty stalls set up for a popular arts-and-crafts fair line both sides of the closed-off main street of La Jonquera, a small town four kilometers inside Spain's border with France. One stand holds glass jars...
Mortality around the World
From Japan to the Netherlands, death is a major part of how we reveal ourselves. It used to be that nothing was more certain than death and taxes. Not anymore. If you are looking for a fixed point in your universe, bank on taxes. The meaning of death...
Ours and Theirs: Redefining Japanese Pop Music
As the houselights dim and the crowd settles into meticulously arranged rows of folding chairs, the music begins. Two waifish divas, clad in turquoise-sequined evening gowns, shuffle onstage and execute a series of highly polished, carefully synchronized...
Peter Carey's 'Jack Maggs.'(Editorial)
Australian novelist Peter Carey was born in 1943 in the small Victoria town of Bacchus Marsh. After a year at Monash University, he began a career in advertising in Melbourne, later relocating first to Brisbane and then to Sydney. Since Australia...
Revelations from the Dirt
Paleoecologist Grace Brush tracks the history of climate, vegetation, and human occupation by "reading" the microscopic components of soils and sediments. In the classroom, Grace Brush quickly impresses students as a woman on some sort of mission. She...
Rothko: Emotion in the Abstract
The angst-driven art of Mark Rothko continues to convey powerful messages long after the heyday of Abstract Expression. For Mark Rothko, a central figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement that dominated world art in the decades following World...
Scalded by Scandal
Easygoing, Trussville, Alabama, lawyer George Harris had high hopes he announced plans to enter the congressional race in the state's Sixth Congressional District last year. "I truly want to be a different kind of candidate, one who focuses on...
Searching for Spirit in Sedona
AMID BREATHTAKING RED ROCKS AND CRUMBLING INDIAN RUINS, SEDONA OFFERS SEEKERS A CHANCE TO DISCOVER ITS MAGICAL AND VERY HUMAN SOUL. We swung off 1-70 onto Route 179 heading north toward Sedona, Arizona. The desert scrub, saguaro cactus and mesquite...
Share in the Light: Native American Stories of Creation
Long ago, before there were ant people, the world was young and water covered everything. The earth was a great island floating above the seas, suspended by four rawhide ropes representing the four sacred directions. It hung down from the crystal...
Skimming Siberia's Sacred Sea
After the winter thaw in June, a modern hydrofoil is the quickest way to traverse lake Baikal during the brief summer season. My first sight of Russia's Lake Baikal came on a snowy afternoon in January, as the Trans-Siberian train from Vladivostok...
Sounds That Cool Spark Hot Ideas
The developing technology of thermoacoustics is showing that sound energy offers a relatively simple and environmentally friendly means to drive refrigerators, air conditioners, and other cooling systems. A sound system has been catching the ear of...
The Amazon's People: Among Brazil's Rain Forest Tribes
Due to the vastness of the Amazonian rain forest, many tribes had not encountered people from the outside world until well into the twentieth century. The fearsome Yanomami, for example, were not "discovered" until 1965, when they confronted workers...
The Gifted High School Dropout
The general public has little sympathy for gifted underachievers because it believes them capable of making it on their own. The tragedy is that many, in fact, do not. Their loss to the education system results in a tremendous loss to our country not...
The People Trust in Them: The Ritual Hunters of West Africa
A strange, solitary figure--long rifle casually slung from his shoulder by a leather strap--walks among the fine cars and gated compounds of the upscale neighborhood. Carved figurines tied to his shirt and flap around his chest. The apparition's brown,...
The Secret Sharer: An Interview and Profile of Anita Brookner
Anita Brookner has vowed never to give another interview, but in the end she invited me to her house for tea. She finds interviews futile--"they always get it wrong"--and an intrusion upon her carefully guarded privacy. Like an adroit sailor avoiding...
The Summit of the Americas
FREE TRADE IN THE AMERICAS UNITED STATES--The first Summit of the Americas, convened by President Clinton four years ago in Miami, set a goal of free trade for the hemisphere by 2005, calling for concrete progress by 2000. The second Summit...