The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 8, August

Acorns to Oaks: Condoleezza Rice's Journey from the Jim Crow South to the White House
Arthur Herstein is managing editor of the American Clergy Magazine. Condoleezza Rice has experienced a wide range of life in America. In her formative years, she experienced life under the Jim Crow system in the South. She excelled in school, established...
Amid the Rubble: Survivors of Bam's Earthquake
Tim Pitts is a freelance photojournalist. On December 26, 2003, a devastating earthquake struck the Kerman province of Iran, killing over 43,000 people. The earthquake, which measured 6.5 on the Richter scale, struck at 5:26 in the morning, when...
A Mother's Day: Today's Women Seek More Respect for the Tradition
Cheryl Wetzstein is a staff writer for The Washington Times. The millions of flowers, cards, and phone calls shared on Mother's Day say it all: Motherhood is honored, cherished, and respected across the nation. Mothers, for the most part, accept...
Antiliberal Perestroika: A New 'Transition' in Russia
Vladimir Shlapentokh is professor in the sociology department at Michigan State University. The author wishes to thank Joshua Woods for his editorial contribution to this article. In late January 2004, Egor Gaidar, a prominent Russian democratic...
Assessing Personality: Phlegmatic? Neurotic? Tests Can Help Find Out
Jen Waters is a staff writer for The Washington Times. After taking the Myers-Briggs personality test, a person is categorized by four of eight distinguishing factors, but these classifications are only some of the many ways people can be understood....
Beating Heart Disease: No. 1 Killer Suffers Lack of Proper Funding
Shelley Widhalm is a staff writer for The Washington Times. Pink ribbons remind women of breast cancer, and the Red Dress Pin is doing the job for the nation's No. 1 killer, heart disease. "Not too many years ago, we thought of heart disease...
Bold Ways with Wood Floors: Varied Trees Available, but People Also Recycle
Christian Toto is a staff writer for The Washington Times. A few years ago, homeowners who wanted a hardwood floor had anywhere from 20 to 30 tree species from which to select. Today, that number has jumped to about 52, says Edward Korczak, executive...
Changes for Homeschoolers
Karen Goldberg Goff is a staff writer for The Washington Times. Forty percent of colleges and universities reported an increase in applications from homeschoolers in 2003, according to the National Association of College Admission Counselors (NACAC),...
Diets: Breaking an Obesogenic Society
Recognizing no simple course will suffice to suppress the swelling epidemic of overweight, specialists are cooking up extra large helpings of potential solutions. From politicians and policymakers to industrialists and investigators, a host of concerned...
Dimming of Vision: Age-Related Sight Loss in Adults 50 and Older
Ann Geracimos is a staff writer for The Washington Times. Walter Ross, a 90-year-old New York City resident and former Reader's Digest roving editor, is legally blind from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) he has had for 37 years. He can't...
EU Expansion Reshapes Future of Europe: New Magazine Will Explore Ramifications
Louis R. Golino is a freelance writer. The largest enlargement of the European Union in its history, which formally took place on May 1, is an important geopolitical development that should be of considerable interest to Americans, specialists on...
Ex-Soviet Republics Chafe at the West's Call for Rights: Seven Nations Seek to Relax Guidelines of OSCE
Christopher Pala is a staff writer for The Washington Times. The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe played a key role during the 1970s and '80s in undermining communism by introducing the spirit of human rights into the countries...
Film as Political Vehicle: Two Films Offer Insight into Today's Iraq
Film as outlet for political comment is anything but a new concept. Debatably, the two most important silent films ever made were Sergei Eisenstein's ode to the Russian Revolution Potemkin in 1916 and D.W. Griffith's less than politically correct civil...
German Phoenix: East Berlin's Capital Statement
Fred Stern, currently based in Loenia, New Jersey, is a writer on art and architectural subjects for ArtNet and other publications. When the Berlin Wall came down on that November day in 1989, East Berliners walked west, West Berliners east, and...
Global Fund Optimistic about AIDS Battle: Growing Caseloads in India, China Cause Concern
John Zarocostas is a staff writer for The Washington Times. Richard G.A. Feachem is executive director of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. He was interviewed recently in Geneva by John Zarocostas and asked about the status...
'God's Plan' Guided Reagan's Life
James G. Lakely is a writer for The Washington Times. Ronald Reagan--who endured an alcoholic father, a poor childhood, uncertain college prospects, a failed marriage, political isolation in Hollywood, a declining movie career, a failed presidential...
Homeschooling Is in a Class of Its Own: Nontraditional Learning Gets High Marks
Karen Goldberg Goff is a staff writer for The Washington Times. Paige Peterson had a full slate of graduation activities scheduled for last spring. The 17-year-old from Sterling Park, Virginia, participated in a graduation ceremony and dance at...
If the Speed of Light Can Change
The speed of light, one of the most sacrosanct of the universal physical constants, may have been lower as recently as two billion years ago--and not in some far corner of the universe, but right here on Earth. The controversial finding is turning...
Keen Eye in Handcrafting Violins
Jen Waters is a staff for The Washington Times. David Ludwik Chrapkiewicz practices empirical science. As owner of Rapkievian Fine Violins in Washington Grove, Maryland, the violin maker uses trial and error to try to make the perfect instrument....
Legacy: Tax Cuts and the End of the USSR
Ralph Z. Hallow and Donald Lambro are both political correspondents at The Washington Times. Ronald Reagan changed American politics by making conservatism and tax- cutting, free-market economics popular with middle-class voters, and ending the...
Lower Castes Gain an Upper Hand: Indian Political Arena Gets New Power Brokers
Mike McPhate is a freelance writer. As Laloo Prasad Yadav, the low-caste head of the opposition Rashtriya Janata Dal party in northern India's Bihar state, reclined in a lawn chair outside his mansion and aired his shirtless potbelly in the evening...
Luminously Figurative: Rare Look at Quirky West Coast Movement
Joanna Shaw-Eagle is a staff writer for The Washington Times. The Kreeger Museum's current exhibit of San Francisco Bay-area figurative art and its offshoots is called "The True Artist Is an Amazing Luminous Fountain." That epigraph, originally...
Mountain Monarchs
Dwight G. Smith is professor and chairman of the Biology Department at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven. North America's wild sheep have conquered some of the most remote and inhospitable terrain, but the stability of their populations...
Not 'Unadoptable': New Effort to Find Homes for Older Foster Children
Lisa Rauschart is a freelance writer. The little boy was more silent than most, withdrawn really. Yet his new adoptive mother was still surprised by what happened one morning after she sent her children into the hallway so she could make up their...
On the Shores of Islands: The Ocean Feeds the Zanzibar Archipelago
Wendy Stone is a freelance photojournalist, represented in the United States by Corbis, and is based in Nairobi, Kenya. A thousand years of trade, settlement, and Islamic expansion have left historic ruins up and down the East African coast. In...
Philosophy of Ronald Reagan Lives on in Memorable Phrases
Quotes by Ronald Reagan Ronald Reagan was noted for his eloquence and wit, both in formal speeches and in ad-libbed humor. Here are some of his memorable phrases, excerpted from The Common Sense of an Uncommon Man (Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1998),...
Reagan's Secret Anti-Soviet War
As president of the United States, Ronald Reagan initiated a sweeping and unprecedented program of covert action and economic warfare initiatives that acted to greatly weaken the Soviet economy, its support for "wars of liberation," and its hold on...
Sacrifice Is Honored: Memorial a Lasting Tribute to Heroes Who Saved the World and Changed It
Scott Galupo is a staff writer for The Washington Times. The World War II Memorial, sober and sunk low in a long frame of elms, rests between the two structures that anchor the Mall. The monument to America's first great warrior, George Washington,...
Silver Screen to White House; President Drew on His Entertainer's Training
Gary Arnold is film critic for The Washington Times. It was a line straight out of an old movie, but hardly anyone knew that at the time. "I paid for this microphone, Mr. Green," presidential candidate Ronald Reagan thundered at debate moderator...
Stromboli Calling: Where Aeolus Blows and Vulcan Fumes
Peter Bridges is a freelance writer. I woke in dimness in some moving place, then realized I was in our cabin on the Vittore Carpaccio southbound from Naples. Quickly I shaved and dressed. My wife, in the top berth, was pretending to be asleep....
The Art of Bonsai: Little Big Trees Marry Science and Aesthetics
Christian Toto is a staff writer for The Washington Times. Bruce Lee movies inspired Terrance Adkins to take up the martial arts in the early 1970s. The iconic films also persuaded Adkins to consider Asian culture in general, and bonsai trees in...
The Charted Wilderness: The Map Lewis and Clark Followed
Alice Beck Kehoe is adjunct professor of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin. Lewis and Clark stand in the middle of Montana, at the junction of two rivers. Which to follow? Which can they bet will lead them to a pass through the Rockies?...
Tough Love from 'America's Dad'
Bill Cosby wants some low-income blacks to take responsibility for their lives and their futures and seize opportunities generations of African Americans fought, sacrificed, and sometimes died for to achieve. Call it tough love, a shout, a plea, an...
Tourists Continue Flocking to Egypt
John Zarocostas is a writer for The Washington Times. Last year's U.S.-led war against Iraq and the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome combined to deal a severe blow to the travel industry worldwide, but Egypt defied the trend, attracting...
Value of Set Limits: A Discerning Eye
Joanna Shaw-Eagle is a staff writer for The Washington Times. There are all kinds of art collectors, as the National Gallery's exhibit "American Masters From Bingham to Eakins: The John Wilmerding Collection" demonstrates. At the show's opening,...
When There's More Than One
Parents who adopt older children are sometimes faced with adopting a sibling or two. While adopting children "in sets" can be helpful for the youngsters, it can raise distinct challenges for the parents. "Wherever there are more children, there...
Wise Up with Chess: Youngsters Take Benefits to Class and Real Life, Too
Jen Waters is a staff writer for The Washington Times. Kaleem Washington of Washington, D.C., is making the right moves. As a member of Olympic Chess House in the Northeast section of the city, he practices the popular game Tuesday and Thursday...