The World and I

World and I is an encyclopedic journal that includes world news; developments in science, the arts and philosophy; book reviews; and photo essays. Since it was founded in 1986, it is printed monthly. The journal is published by Washington Times Corp.Subjects for World and I include science; literature and literary reviews; food and cooking; art; travel and tourism; politics; philosophy; music and musical instruments; drama and theatre. The editor is Steve Osmond.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 2, February

A Land between Waters: Reviving a Black Township on the Chesapeake Bay
Each morning Solomon Burton, 69, trudges across the dirt road from the tar- paper shack he rents for forty-five dollars a month. He places a white plastic bucket under a hand-pump spigot and starts cranking the handle. The water tastes faintly rusty,...
Appeal to Under-30 Black Americans
Approaching the next century, Abraham Lincoln's party is faced with the unsettling task of finding "colored" faces to fill its ranks. Party demographers scratch their heads and rattle their brains in discomfort, while academics are rife with bewildering...
Black and Affluent
One of the most remarkable developments in America in the last 25 years has been the emergence of a strong, vibrant black middle class. Of the 34 million African Americans, more than one-third meet the definition of middle class--they reside in...
Breaking the Voice Barrier
Telephones, computers, the Internet, and commerce are all being drawn into new levels of intimacy as speech recognition technology comes of age. In the Christmas season of 1998, shopping via the Internet became a significant reality as more than...
City and Ibby's Legacy
Along a dirt road about two miles from the main Bayview settlement one meets Teddy Baker. He lives on his family's farm. It has been passed down from his great-great-grandfather, City Saunders, a freed slave who worked the sandy ground all his life....
Clinton's Incoherent Policy
Baghdad's October 31 decision to suspend weapons monitoring by the UN Special Commission (UNSCOM) precipitated the third Iraq crisis within a year. But the third crisis ended as unsatisfactorily as the first two, underscoring the Clinton administration's...
Come Blow Your Horn
Graceful afloat and in flight, the magnificent trumpeter swan has become a metaphor for all that is wild and beautiful and worth saving in the habitats of North America. A short, sharp honk cuts through the crisp, clean air of a February morning....
Coming Apart: Russia after Yeltsin
If history credits President Reagan with opening the Soviet Union, it may well judge President Clinton as the one who lost Russia. In a 1992 campaign speech before the Foreign Policy Association, would-be president Bill Clinton tried to allay the...
Dean of Evangelists
Few people have the sweetness of soul to accept a chronic, debilitating malady as the will, and indeed the blessing, of God--but evangelist Billy Graham is one of them. Of the Parkinson's disease that has palsied him since 1992, the 80-year-old...
Definite Article Threatens Independence
To the Editor: "The Theatrical Lions of Lvov" [November 1998, p. 96] is an interesting article, but although it describes the city of Lvov, it is light in terms of describing the plays themselves, and there is almost no discussion of Lvov's very...
Do School Vouchers Work?
The issue of education vouchers has become a new Gettysburg for America in the closing years of the twentieth century--and promises to continue to be a blood-soaked civil war battlefield in the new millennium. School vouchers--payments made to parents...
Everyone Is Reasonable: Chinese Assimilation in Thailand
The woman stood in the sweltering midday heat among hundreds of other protesting textile workers. They were outside Thai-Melon, Thailand's largest textile factory before its closure, on the northern road out of Bangkok, just past the tourist-clogged...
Eye on Edo: Art in Japan 1615--1868
With numerous cultural treasures that have never traveled outside Japan, the first comprehensive U.S. exhibition of art of the Edo period presents a sumptuous visual feast. We know different cultures by great periods of art--the Tang dynasty for...
`Gateway to the World': Korea's Little Angels Arts School
With a talented student body and two world-class dance companies, this flourishing school in Seoul is doing much to spread Korea's rich cultural heritage to the world. In the suburbs along the eastern edge of sprawling Seoul lies an arts institution...
General Lebed and the Russian Political Crisis
Hearing the news that Gen. Alexander Lebed had been elected governor of the Krasnoyarsk region in Siberia, I immediately called the local branch of the Council on Foreign Relations and offered to share with the public my views of the event and its...
Government Is a Barrier to Progress
Traditional civil rights organizations, such as the NAACP, deserve a great deal of praise for advancing freedom on behalf of black Americans. Prior to the civil rights revolution, virulent racism combined with state-sponsored discrimination constituted...
Kashmir Powder Keg
The world's first nuclear war is likely not so much between missile-laden America and Russia as between impoverished India and Pakistan--and the contested area of Kashmir is the hair trigger that could set it off. For the United States, this could...
Let's Save Our Dark Sky
The proliferation of night lights is robbing us of the starry heavens that have inspired humanity at least since the beginning of recorded history. Have you looked up at the night sky lately? For most of us, the stars and the Milky Way have nearly...
Lights, Cameras, Arrest!
The police receive a reliable tip that a crime has been committed. They obtain a valid warrant to enter and search the private property and persons connected with the suspected crime. The police are in full compliance with the U.S. Constitution's Fourth...
Martin Luther
Martin Luther (1483--1546) joined the Order of St. Augustine in 1506. Among his teachers were councilors as well as Nominalists, and when Luther went to the University of Wittenberg, in his native Saxony, as an Augustinian professor of theology in...
On the Front Lines of Voice Recognition
In Houston, Russell Douglas, vice president for technology development at Advanced Voice Recognition Inc. (AVRI), sees the field of voice recognition from the perspective of a small company providing a specific service. "We've learned the hard way...
Power from the Sun
The world's record for converting solar energy to grid-quality electricity is held by a type of equipment known as the "solar dish genset." This genset consists of a parabolic-dish solar concentrator attached to a Stirling-cycle heat engine that employs...
Race and Market Matters
How efficient are markets? When markets don't work, how much government intervention is justified to generate societally desirable results? The answers to these questions seem to be the great divide between the Left and the Right, the folks who are...
Recognize the Genuine Diversity of Black Americans
American history is full of myths and fables that serve to teach us many important lessons and help unify us as a nation. These stories are rarely true, yet they are often accepted as fact. This practice is usually harmless, as in the case of the well-known...
Run When the Bell Rings!: The Pancake Race in Olney, England
Frying pan in hand, arms raised in triumph, Natalie Thomas burst through the tape and plunged into the embrace of her waiting husband. Several yards ahead of the next runner, her time of 58.5 seconds was the fastest ever recorded for the race. As...
Scholasticism, Prostestantism, and Modernity
Protestantism rose on the downfall of scholasticism, and Protestantism, in turn, led to the demise of hierarchy and the rise of individualism. A curious but significant byproduct of the Protestant Reformation was moral support for what became middle-class...
Scott Anderson's Triage
Editor's Introduction In journalism, combat reporters and photographers are a breed apart. Chasing war around the globe, these voyeurs of its horrors eventually become alienated loners--casualties who are as numbed and scarred as the combatants...
Tapping Energy from Solar Hydrogen
With the development of specific technologies to produce hydrogen from renewable resources, store it safely, and use it in critical applications, we have opened the door to unlimited supplies of clean energy. Wind is plentiful in coastal areas and...
The Angels Soar
Since their beginning in 1965, the Little Angels Folk Ballet has been Korea's emissary of peace and goodwill to the world. These graceful and charming young dancers have displayed their talent across six continents, performing in 50 countries. In the...
The Black Renascence
The Special Report this month is on the black renascence. The whole nation should take pride in the facts reported in this Special Report. The rise in black income, the increase in educated and professional blacks, the decline in segregated housing--all...
The Democracy Movement in China
To the outside world, the Chinese democracy movement seems to be covered by a veil so thick that it cannot be seen clearly. What is happening with it? What are democracy activists thinking and doing? The following observations were shaped after soliciting...
The Hopes and Fears of the Black Middle Class
The African-American middle class at the end of the twentieth century distinguishes itself from previous generations by its visibility and influence. Jesse Jackson stands before a gymnasium full of young black students and leads them in the exhortation...
The Landscape of War
"Severe trauma explodes the cohesion of consciousness." ----Jonathan Shay A war photographer's memories provide insights into the shattering effects of war, as well as its strange, seductive beauty. Triage is the latest of Scott Anderson's many...
The Rise of the Black Middle Class
For the first time, black Americans responded more favorably than whites to the question of whether they were better or worse off financially than the previous year. In November 1998, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a Washington,...
The Sphinx: Mythical Beasts of the Middle East, Part 3
The Great Sphinx at Giza has exerted a powerful hold over man's imagination since ancient times. Appealing to our sense of mystery, the Sphinx continues to beguile and fascinate us. It is the brooding enigma of a remote and lofty antiquity. Crouching...
The Struggle to Regain Credibility
At the annual meeting of the Associated Press Managing Editors this past October, 250 daily newspaper editors got a deeply unsettling message about their standing with the public. A public opinion survey by the Media Studies Center in New York City...
William of Ockham
William of Ockham (1285--1349) contributed decisively to the medieval chain of thought leading to the Protestant Reformation. By radically separating faith and reason, this English monk laid the groundwork for both philosophic skepticism and deeply...